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File 31/1144: comp.windows.x Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) 1/5 (73.0%)



This article and several following contain the answers to some Frequently Asked 
Questions (FAQ) often seen in comp.windows.x. It is posted to help reduce 
volume in this newsgroup and to provide hard-to-find information of general 
interest.

		Please redistribute this article!

This article includes answers to the following questions, which are loosely
grouped into categories. Questions marked with a + indicate questions new to 
this issue; those with significant changes of content since the last issue are 
marked by !:

  0)  TOPIC: BASIC INFORMATION SOURCES AND DEFINITIONS
  1)! What books and articles on X are good for beginners?
  2)! What courses on X and various X toolkits are available?
  3)! What conferences on X are coming up?
  4)  What X-related public mailing lists are available?
  5)  How can I meet other X developers? 
  6)  What related FAQs are available?
  7)  How do I ask a net-question so as to maximize helpful responses?
  8)  What publications discussing X are available?
  9)  What are these common abbreviations/acronyms?
 10)  What is the ICCCM? (How do I write X-friendly applications?)
 11)  What is the X Consortium, and how do I join?
 12)  Just what are OPEN LOOK and Motif?
 13)  Just what is OpenWindows?
 14)  Just what is DECWindows?
 15)  What is PEX?
 16)  What is "low-bandwidth X" (LBX)? XRemote? PPP? SLIP? CSLIP?
 17)  TOPIC: USING X IN DAY-TO-DAY LIFE
 18)! What are all these different window managers?
 19)  Why does my X session exit when I kill my window manager (sic)?
 20)  Can I save the state of my X session, like toolplaces does?
 21)  How do I use another window manager with DEC's session manager?
 22)  How do I change the keyboard auto-repeat rate?
 23)  How do I remap the keys on my keyboard to produce a string?
 24)! How do I make a screendump or print my application?
 25)  How do I make a color PostScript screendump of the X display?
 26)  How do I make a screendump including the X cursor?
 27)  How do I convert/view Mac/TIFF/GIF/Sun/PICT/img/FAX images in X?
 28)  How can I change the titlebar of my xterm window?
 29)  Where can I find the xterm control sequences?
 30)- Why does the R3 xterm, et al, fail against the R4 server?
 31)  How can I use characters above ASCII 127 in xterm ?
 32)  Why are my xterm menus so small?
 33)  How can I print the current selection?
 34)  How does Xt use environment variables in loading resources?
 35)  How to I have the R4 xdm put a picture behind the log-in window?
 36)  Why isn't my PATH set when xdm runs my .xsession file?
 37)  How do I keep my $DISPLAY when I rlogin to another machine?
 38)  How can I design my own font?
 39)  Why does adding a font to the server not work (sic)?
 40)  How do I convert a ".snf" font back to ".bdf" font?
 41)  What is a general method of getting a font in usable format?
 42)  How do I use DECwindows fonts on my non-DECwindows server?
 43)  How do I add ".bdf" fonts to my DECwindows server?
 44)! How can I set backgroundPixmap in a defaults file? (What is XPM?)
 45)  Why can't I override translations? Only the first item works.
 46)  How can I have xclock or oclock show different timezones?
 47)  I have xmh, but it doesn't work. Where can I get MH?
 48)  Why am I suddenly unable to connect to my Sun X server?
 49)  Why don't the R5 PEX demos work on my mono screen?
 50)! How do I get my Sun Type-[45] keyboard fully supported by Xsun?
 51)  How do I report bugs in X?
 52)  Why do I get "Warning: Widget class version mismatch"?
 53)  Where can I find a dictionary server for xwebster?
 54)  TOPIC: OBTAINING X AND RELATED SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE
 55)  Is X public-domain software?
 56)  How compatible are X11R3, R4, and R5? What changes are there?
 57)! Where can I get X11R5 (source and/or binaries)?
 58)! Where can I get patches to X11R5?
 59)  What is the xstuff mail-archive?
 60)! Where can I get X11R4 (source and binaries)?
 61)  Where can I get OSF/Motif?
 62)  Does Motif work with X11R4? X11R5?
 63)  Where can I get toolkits implementing OPEN LOOK?
 64)! Where can I get other X sources? (including R5 modifications)
 65)! Where can I get interesting widgets?
 66)  Where can I get a good file-selector widget?
 67)  What widget is appropriate to use as a drawing canvas?
 68)  What is the current state of the world in X terminals?
 69)  Where can I get an X server with a touchscreen or lightpen?
 70)  Where can I get an X server on a PC (DOS or Unix)?
 71)  Where can I get an X server on a Macintosh running MacOS?
 72)  Where can I get X for the Amiga?
 73)  Where can I get a fast X server for a workstation?
 74)! Where can I get a server for my high-end Sun graphics board?
 75)  Where can I get an "X terminal" server for my low-end Sun 3/50?
 76)  What terminal emulators other than xterm are available?
 77)! Where can I get an X-based editor or word-processor?
 78)  Where can I get an X-based mailer?
 79)! Where can I get an X-based paint/draw program?
 80)! Where can I get an X-based plotting program?
 81)  Where can I get an X-based spreadsheet?
 82)  Where can I get X-based project-management software?
 83)  Where can I get an X-based PostScript previewer?
 84)  Where can I get an X-based GKS package?
 85)  Where can I get an X-based PEX package?
 86)  Where can I get an X-based TeX or DVI previewer?
 87)  Where can I get an X-based troff previewer?
 88)! Where can I get a WYSIWYG interface builder?
 89)  Where can I find X tools callable from shell scripts?
 90)  Where can I get an X-based debugger?
 91)! How can I "tee" an X program identically to several displays?
 92)  TOPIC: BUILDING THE X DISTRIBUTION [topic needs updating to R5]
 93)  What's a good source of information on configuring the X build?
 94)  Why doesn't my Sun with a cg6 work with R5?
 95)  Why doesn't my Sun with SunOS 4.1 know about _dlsym, etc.?
 96)  What is this strange problem building X clients on SunOS 4.1.2?
 97)  Why can't gcc compile X11R4 on my SPARC?
 98)  What are these I/O errors running X built with gcc?
 99)  What are these problems compiling X11R4 on the older Sun3?
100)  What are these problems compiling the X server on SunOS 4.1.1?
101)  What are these problems using R4 shared libraries on SunOS 4?
102)  Can OLIT programs run with R5 Xt? (_XtQString undefined)
103)  How do I get around the SunOS 4.1 security hole?
104)  How do I get around the frame-buffer security hole?
105)  TOPIC: BUILDING X PROGRAMS 
106)  What is Imake?
107)  Where can I get imake?
108)  I have a program with an Imakefile but no Makefile. What to do?
109)  Why can't I link to the Xlib shape routines?
110)  What are these problems with "_XtInherit not found" on the Sun?
111)  Why can't I compile my R3 Xaw contrib programs under the new X?
112)  TOPIC: PROGRAMMING PROBLEMS AND PUZZLES
113)  Why doesn't my program get the keystrokes I select for (sic)?
114)  How do I figure out what window manager is running?
115)  Is there a skeleton X program available?
116)  Why does XtGetValues not work for me (sic)?
117)  Why don't XtConfigureWidget/XtResizeWidget/XtMoveWidget work?
118)  Why isn't there an XtReparentWidget call like XReparentWindow?
119)  I'm writing a widget and can't use a float as a resource value.
120)  Is this a memory leak in the X11R4 XtDestroyWidget()?!
121)  Are callbacks guaranteed to be called in the order registered?
122)  Why doesn't XtDestroyWidget() actually destroy the widget?
123)  How do I query the user synchronously using Xt?
124)  How do I determine the name of an existing widget?
125)  Why do I get a BadDrawable error drawing to XtWindow(widget)?
126)  Why do I get a BadMatch error when calling XGetImage?
127)  How can my application tell if it is being run under X?
128)  How do I make a "busy cursor" while my application is computing?
129)  How do I fork without hanging my parent X program?
130)  Can I make Xt or Xlib calls from a signal handler?
131)  What are these "Xlib sequence lost" errors?
132)  How can my Xt program handle socket, pipe, or file input?
133)  How do I simulate a button press/release event for a widget?
134)  Why doesn't anything appear when I run this simple program?
135)  What is the difference between a Screen and a screen?
136)  Can I use C++ with X11? Motif? XView?
137)  Where can I obtain alternate language bindings to X?
138)  Can XGetWindowAttributes get a window's background pixel/pixmap?
139)  How do I create a transparent window?
140)  Why doesn't GXxor produce mathematically-correct color values?
141)  Why does every color I allocate show up as black?
142)  Why can't my program get a standard colormap?
143)  Why does the pixmap I copy to the screen show up as garbage? 
144)  How do I check whether a window ID is valid?
145)  Can I have two applications draw to the same window?
146)  Why can't my program work with tvtwm or swm?
147)  How do I keep a window from being resized by the user?
148)  How do I keep a window in the foreground at all times?
149)  How do I make text and bitmaps blink in X?
150)+ How do I get a double-click in Xlib?
151)! How do I render rotated text?
152)  What is the X Registry? (How do I reserve names?)

If you have suggestions or corrections for any of these answers or any 
additional information, please send them directly to uunet!craft!faq;
the information will be included in the next revision (or possibly the one 
after that; thanks for the many suggestions which haven't been incorporated 
yet). 

This version of the FAQ is in the process of having R3 information replaced
by R5 information.

This posting is intended to be distributed at approximately the beginning of 
each month. New versions are archived on export.lcs.mit.edu and are also 
available from mail-server@pit-manager.mit.edu and archive-server@nic.switch.ch
(send "help").

The information contained herein has been gathered from a variety of sources. 
In many cases attribution has been lost; if you would like to claim 
responsibility for a particular item, please let me know. 

Conventions used below: telephone numbers tend to be Bell-system unless 
otherwise noted; prices on items are not included; email addresses are those
that work from the US.

X Window System is a trademark of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

(Note: a script by George Ferguson (ferguson@cs.rochester.edu) to pretty-print
this faq is available from ugle.unit.no:/pub/X11/contrib/xfaq2texinfo.)

----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------

	Ken Lee of SynOptics (klee@synoptics.com) regularly posts to 
comp.windows.x and ba.windows.x a bibliography containing cites of all known 
reference books and how-to manuals and also cites of selected technical 
articles on X and X programming; it is ftp-able as 
	export.lcs.mit.edu:/contrib/Xbibliography and 
	gatekeeper.dec.com:/pub/X11/contrib/Xbibliography

Here is an unordered set of the reference books and tutorials most useful for
beginners; most appear on that list [comments are gathered from a variety of 
places and are unattributable]:

Asente, Paul J., and Swick, Ralph R., "X Window System Toolkit, The Complete
Programmer's Guide and Specification", Digital Press, 1990.  The bible on Xt. A
treasury of information, excellent and invaluable.  Distributed by Digital 
Press, ISBN 1-55558-051-3, order number EY-E757E-DP; and by Prentice-Hall, 
ISBN 0-13-972191-6. Also available through DEC Direct at 1-800-DIGITAL. 
[The examples are on export.lcs.mit.edu in contrib/ and on gatekeeper.dec.com 
(16.1.0.2) in pub/X11/contrib as asente-swick.examples.tar.Z.  They were also 
posted to comp.sources.x as xt-examples/part0[1-5].]

Jones, Oliver, Introduction to the X Window System, Prentice-Hall, 1988, 1989.
ISBN 0-13-499997-5. An excellent introduction to programming with Xlib.  
Written with the programmer in mind, this book includes many practical tips 
that are not found anywhere else. This book is not as broad as the O'Reilly 
Xlib tutorial, but Jones is an experienced X programmer and this shows in the 
quality and depth of the material in the book. Originally written for X11R1, 
recent printings have included corrections and additions and current material.
 
Young, Doug. "The X Window System: Applications and Programming with Xt (Motif 
Version)," Prentice Hall, 1989 (ISBN 0-13-497074-8). The excellent tutorial 
"X Window System Programming and Applications with Xt," (ISBN 0-13-972167-3) 
updated for Motif. [The examples are available on export; the ones from the 
Motif version are in ~ftp/contrib/young.motif.tar.Z.]

Young, Doug and John Pew, "The X Window System: Programming and Applications 
with Xt, OPEN LOOK Edition" (ISBN 0-13-982992-X). The tutorial rewritten for 
OLIT, with new examples and drag/drop information. [Examples are on export in
youg.olit.tar.Z and in you OpenWindows 3 distribution in 
$OPENWINHOME/share/src/olit/olitbook.]

Heller, Dan. "Motif Programmers Manual". The 6th Volume in the O'Reilly series
covers Motif application programming; it's full of good examples. With Motif
reference pages. (ISBN 0-9937175-70-6.)  [The examples are available on uunet
in comp.sources.x and nutshell archives.] [A Motif 1.2 will be out soon.]
 
Scheifler, Robert, and James Gettys, with Jim Flowers and David Rosenthal, "X 
Window System: The Complete Reference to Xlib, X Protocol, ICCCM, XLFD, X 
Version 11, Release 5, Third Edition," Digital Press, 1992. "The Bible" in its 
latest revision, an enhanced version of X documentation by the authors of the 
Xlib documentation. This is the most complete published description of the X 
programming interface and X protocol. It is the primary reference work and is 
not introductory tutorial documentation; additional tutorial works will usually
be needed by most new X programmers.  Digital Press order EY-J802E-DP, ISBN 
0-13-971201-1.
 	
Nye, Adrian, "Xlib Programming Manual, Volume 1" and "Xlib Reference Manual, 
Volume 2," O'Reilly and Associates. A superset of the MIT X documentation; the 
first volume is a tutorial with broad coverage of Xlib, and the second 
contains reference pages for Xlib functions and many useful reference 
appendices.  Both cover X11R5 (and R4). ISBN 0-937175-26-9 (volume 1) and ISBN 
0-937175-27-7 (volume 2). 

Nye, Adrian, and Tim O'Reilly, "X Toolkit Programming Manual, Volume 4,"
O'Reilly and Associates, 1989. The folks at O'Reilly give their comprehensive
treatment to programming with the MIT Intrinsics; R4 versions are now
available, as is a Motif 1.1 version (Volume 4M).

O'Reilly, Tim, ed.,  "X Toolkit Reference Manual, Volume 5," O'Reilly and 
Associates. A professional reference manual for the MIT X11R4 and X11R5 Xt.

Mansfield, Niall. "The X Window System: A User's Guide," Addison-Wesley, 1989.
A tutorial introduction to using X, now upgraded for R4. ISBN 0-201-51341-2.

Quercia, Valerie and Tim O'Reilly. "X Window System User's Guide," O'Reilly and
Associates. A tutorial introduction to using X. ISBN 0-937175-36-6.
Also available in R4 and Motif flavors.

Mui, Linda and Eric Pearce. "X Window System Administrator's Guide for X11 R4 
and R5" [ORA Volume 8]. Help for X users and administrators. 
ISBN 0-937175-83-8.

(Prentice-Hall ordering is 201-767-5937. O'Reilly ordering is 800-998-9938.)

In addition, check the X11R4 and X11R5 core distribution in doc/tutorials for 
some useful papers and tutorials, particularly the file answers.txt.  "Late 
Night's Top Ten X11 Questions" by Dave Lemke (lemke@ncd.com) and Stuart Marks 
(smarks@sun.com) answers other common questions and some of these here in more
detail.

New R5 versions of the O'Reilly references (not yet Volume 6) are now available
[8/92].  A single volume, "Programmer's Supplement for R5" by David Flanagan, 
provides an overview of new R5 features; it includes man pages for Xlib, Xt, 
and Xmu. [ISBN  0-937175-86-2]

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	Advanced Computing Environments periodically offers at least a two-day
Introduction course. Contact Susie Karlson at 415-941-3399 for information.

	AT&T offers training in Xlib and in the Xol set. Contact AT&T Corporate
Education & Training for more info; 1-800-TRAINER in the USA.

	BIM Educational Services offers training in X administration and in
programming with Xt/Motif and Open Windows; the courses are given near 
Brussels. Info: edu@sunbim.be, voice +32-(0)2-7595925, fax +32-(0)2-7599209.

	Communica Software Consultants offers three-day hands-on courses in X 
designed for the X Window System developer and programmer. Contact Chris 
Clarkson, telephone 61 8 3732523, e-mail communica@communica.oz.au. [12/92]

	Cora Computer Technologies (516-485-7343) offers several courses.

	GHCT offers a one week lecture/lab course for programmmers designed by
Douglas Young based on his book "The X Window System: Programming and Applica-
tions with Xt, OSF/Motif Edition". Information: Brian Stell (415-966-8805 or
ghct!brian@sgi.com).

	GHG offers a range of courses on X and Motif. Information: 713-488-8806
or training-info@ghg.hou.tx.us.

	Hands On Learning has live training and self-paced video workshops on 
topics such as using and/or programming X, Xlib, Xm, Xt, and widget-writing. 

	Hewlett-Packard (1-800-HPCLASS; or contact your local HP center) offers
a 2-day "Introduction to X", a 5-day Xlib course, a 1-day Xt and Motif 1.1 
seminar, and a 5-day Motif lab course.

	Integrated Computer Solutions, Inc., offers several multi-day, hands-on
courses on X, Xt, and the Xaw and Motif widget sets, in particular. Information
is available at 617-621-0060 and info@ics.com.

	Intelligent Visual Computing teaches several lab courses on-site for
Motif and XView. IVC is at 1-800-776-2810 or +1 919-481-1353 or at 
info@ivc.com.

	Iris Computing Laboratories offers five-day Xlib and Xt courses.

	IXI Limited (+44 223 462 131) offers regular X training courses for 
both programmers and non-technical managers. See also: Unipalm, below.

	Learning Tree International offers a four-day course in X Window System
applications development, including Xlib and some information on Motif.  For 
more info call 800-824-9155 (213-417-3484); 613-748-7741 in Canada. Courses are
offered in major North American cities; also in London, Stockholm, Tokyo, and 
elsewhere.

	Lurnix offers 4-day "type-along courses" on Xt; the course is being
ported from Xaw to Xm. Information is available at 800-433-9337 (in CA: -9338).

	Mitch Trachtenberg and Associates offers regular 5-day lab courses on
programming with OSF/Motif, usually in but not limited to Cambridge, MA. 

	Non Standard Logics (+33 (1) 43 36 77 50; requests@nsl.fr) offers
courses on programming with Xlib, Motif, and creating Motif widgets.

	OSF Educational Services (617-621-8778) offers one-day seminars and 
one-week Motif lab courses.

	John A. Pew offers a 5-day course on OLIT, possibly based on his book
on that subject; 408-224-5739.

	SCO (+44 923 816344, scol-info@sco.COM) offers training for its Open 
Desktop (Motif) environment in the UK and Europe.

	Software Pundits (617-270-0639) offers a range of courses.

	Technology Exchange (617-944-3700) offers a 4-day Xlib/Xt/Motif course.

	TeleSoft is now offering a 1-day plus 3-day seminar on X and Motif.

	Unipalm XTech offers OSF's 5-day Motif course and a 1-day overview on 
X.  Information: Unipalm Training at +44 952  211797, xtech@unipalm.co.uk.

	The University of Edinburgh is developing a series of courses on X and
related topics primarily for non-profit-making training in academia but also 
for commercial use. Information: Cliff Booth, Unipalm Ltd, phone +44 223 
420002, fax +44 223 426868.

	Various other vendors are also beginning to offer X training, usually 
specific to a proprietary toolkit or to Xt and a proprietary widget set: DEC 
is offering Xlib courses; Sun offers an XView course.

	Various universities are offering short X courses or overviews: UCLA,
Dartmouth, University of Lowell, University of Canberra (within Australia: 
062-522422) ... 
	UC Berkeley Extension will have a one week X/Motif class for 
programmers in San Francisco starting on July 29.  The class will have a 
hands-on lab. For more information contact UCBX at 415 323 8141.

	Among the best places to find courses are at the various Unix 
conferences -- Uniforum, Usenix, Unix Expo, Xhibition, the MIT X Technical
Conference, the ACM tutorial weeks, &c.

	In addition, the X Consortium posts approximately quarterly a list of
unendorsed speakers and consultants who can provide talks on a variety of X 
topics.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	The Xhibition 93 X trade show and conference, with tutorials, panels, 
presentations, and vendor exhibits, will be held at the San Jose Convention
Center June 7-11, 1993.  Information: +1 617 621 0060, xhibit@ics.com.

	The Tcl/Tk Workshop will be held at UCal Berkeley June 10-11, 1993.

	The 1993 Andrew Technical Conference and Consortium Annual Meeting will
be held June 24-25, 1993, in Pittsburgh. Information: 
Wilfred.Hansen@cs.cmu.EDU.

	The European X User Group holds an annual conference which typically 
includes includes paper presentations and a vendor exhibit. EXUG'93, "X in the
Real World and Multimedia" will be held 9/16-9/17 at the Imperial College of
Science and Technology, London. Information: exug@demon.co.uk, niall@uit.co.uk 
or p.whitehead@cc.ic.ac.uk, +44 (0) 223 426534, fax +44 (0) 223 420251.

	The Motif show is held in Washington to coincide with the FedUnix and 
the Federal Open Systems Conference (usually December). Information: 
motif@fedunix.org or paller@fedunix.org, 301-229-1062, fax 301-229-1063.

	The MIT X Technical Conference is typically held in January in Boston.
Registration information is available from registration@expo.lcs.mit.edu.

	The XWorld Conference and Exhibition includes tutorials, panels, 
presentations and vendor exhibits. It is typically held in March in New York 
City.  Information: SIGS Publication Group at 212-274-9135.


	Other trade shows -- UnixExpo, Uniforum, Siggraph -- show an increasing
presence of X, including tutorials and exhibits.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	The xpert mailing list is the general, public mailing list on X
maintained by the X Consortium. The mailings are gatewayed, so xpert is almost 
identical to the comp.windows.x Usenet newsgroup. 

	***	If you get comp.windows.x, you don't need to 	***
	***	be added to the xpert mailing list. 		***

	Otherwise, you can join the list to receive X information 
electronically. It is best to find a local distribution; perhaps someone within
your company is already receiving the mailing. As a last resort, send mail to 
xpert-request@expo.lcs.mit.edu with a valid return electronic address. 

	The xannounce mailing list carries major X announcements, such as new
releases (including public patches from MIT), public reviews, adoption of 
standards by the MIT X Consortium, and conference announcements.  It does NOT 
carry advertisements, source code, patches, or questions.  If you already 
receive the Usenet news group comp.windows.x.announce or the xpert mailing 
list, you don't need to be added to the xannounce mailing list.  Otherwise, to 
subscribe, send a request to xannounce-request@expo.lcs.mit.edu. Note: Only 
redistribution addresses will be accepted for this list -- i.e. no personal 
addresses. If you wish to receive xannounce yourself, please contact your mail 
administrator to set up a local redistribution list and to put you on it.  
	comp.windows.x.apps is not gatewayed to a mailing list.

	In addition, the X Consortium sponsors these public lists:
		bug-clx         CLX bug reports and discussions
		x-ada           X and ada
		x11-3d          people interested in X and 3d graphics
		ximage          people interested in image processing and X
		xvideo          discussion of video extensions for X
	To subscribe to one of these lists, assuming no-one in your 
organization already receives it, send mail to -request@expo.lcs.mit.edu
with the Subject line including the name of the LIST in caps and the request
"addition request".  In the body of the message be sure to give an address for 
your local distribution which is accessible from MIT (eddie.mit.edu).

	A mailing list for topics related to OPEN LOOK is sponsored by Greg
Pasquariello of Unify corporation; send to openlook-request@unify.com (or
openlook-request%unify@uunet.uu.net) for information. 
	A mailing list for bugs in the publicly-available version of XView
source, in particular, is sponsored by Sun; send for information to 
xviewbug-trackers-request@sun.com. 
	A mailing list for topics related to Motif is sponsored by Kee Hinckley
of Alfalfa Software, Inc.; send to motif-request@alfalfa.com for information. 
(This group is gatewayed to comp.windows.x.motif.)
	A mailing list for topics related to the XPM pixmap-format is sponsored
by Arnaud Le Hors of Group Bull; send to xpm-talk-request@sa.inria.fr for
information. [1/91]
	A mailing list discussing InterViews can be subscribed to by sending to
interviews-request@interviews.stanford.edu.
	A mailing list (amiga-x11@nic.funet.fi) for topics related to the port 
of X11 to the Amiga can be subscribed by sending to mailserver@nic.funet.fi a 
message containing
		Subject: Adding myself to AMIGA-X11
		SUBS AMIGA-X11 Your Real Name
	A mailing list discussing ParcPlace's (formerly Solbourne's) OI (Object
Interface) toolkit can be subscribed to at oi-users-requests@bbn.com.
	A mailing list discussing multi-threaded Xlib can be subscribed to at
mt-xlib-request@xsoft.xerox.com.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	O'Reilly and Associates sponsors a mailing list for the use of X user 
group organizers; subscribe by sending to listserv@ora.com the message 
"subscribe xgroups your@internet.address".

	Local area X user's groups are listed in Issue 4 of O'Reilly's X 
Resource journal; a list may also be available from xug@ics.com.

	The French X User Group is called AFUX and is based in Sophia Antipolis
by CERICS. Information can be obtained from Miss Vasseur or Miss Forest; BP 
148; 157, rue Albert Einstein; 06561 Valbonne Cedex; Phone: +33 93 95 45 00 / 
45 01; Fax: +33 93 95 48 57.  [10/90]

	The European X User Group was formed in 1989 to represent X users in 
Europe.  It holds technical conferences at regular intervals. The EXUG also 
publishes a regular newsletter which is distributed free of charge to members. 
The EXUG also runs a email mailing list for members which is frequently used to
address issues of European interest in X. The EXUG can be contacted at
P.Whitehead@cc.ic.ac.uk, +44 (071) 225 8754, fax +44 (071) 823 9497.

	GXUGiV is the German X User's Group in Vorbereitung ("in preparation")
being formed for X programmers and users; it is associated with the EXUG. All
interested should contact Olaf Heimburger (+49 30 7 79 54 64; and at
mcvax!unido!tub!olaf).

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	Liam R. E. Quin (lee@sq.sq.com) posts a FAQ on Open Look to 
comp.windows.open-look.  
	Jan Newmarch (jan@pandonia.canberra.edu.au) posts a FAQ on Motif to 
comp.windows.x.motif.
	Peter Ware (ware@cis.ohio-state.edu) posts a FAQ for
comp.windows.x.intrinsics; it is on export in contrib/FAQ-Xt.
	Art Mulder (art@cs.ualberta.ca) posts to comp.windows.x a FAQ on 
maximizing the performance of X.
	Steve Kotsopoulos (steve@ecf.toronto.edu) posts to comp.windows.x a FAQ
about using X on Intel-based Unix systems.
	The FAQ in alt.binaries.pictures contains information on viewing images
with X and on massaging image formats.
	The FAQ in comp.mail.mh (gatewayed to MH-users@ics.uci.edu) includes a 
section on xmh.
	The FAQ in comp.lang.lisp contains information on several interface
tools and toolkits.
	There exists a PEX/PHiGS FAQ.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	When asking for help on the net or X mailing lists, be sure to include 
all information about your setup and what you are doing.  The more specific you
are, the more likely someone will spot an error in what you are doing.  Without
all the details, people who want to help you often have to guess -- if they are
able to respond at all.

	Always mention what version of X you are using and where you got it 
from. If your server came from a different source as the rest of your X system,
give details of that, too.  Give the machine type, operating system, and O/S 
version for both the client and server machine.  It may also be appropriate to 
mention the window manager, compiler, and display hardware type you are using.

	Then tell exactly what you are doing, exactly what happens, and what
you expected/wanted to happen.  If it is a command that fails, include the 
exact transcript of your session in the message.  If a program you wrote 
doesn't work the way you expect, include as little of the source necessary 
(just a small test case, please!) for readers to reproduce the problem.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	The trade magazines (Unix World, Unix Review, Computer Language, etc.)
are publishing more articles on X.  Two X-specific publications include:

	- O'Reilly and Associates publishes "The X Resource: A Practical 
Journal of the X Window System" (103 Morris St. #A, Sebastapol, CA 95472).  
Editorial information: Adrian Nye, adrian@ora.com.

	- The X Journal is started bi-monthly publication September 1991 on a 
variety of X topics. Subscription information: The X Journal, Subscriber 
Services, Dept XXX, P.O. Box 3000, Denville, NJ 07834, USA. Editorial 
information: editors%topgun@uunet.uu.net.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	Xt: The X Toolkit Intrinsics is a library layered on Xlib which 
provides the functionality from which the widget sets are built. An "Xt-based" 
program is an application which uses one of those widget sets and which uses 
Intrinsics mechanisms to manipulate the widgets.
	Xmu: The Xmu library is a collection of Miscellaneous Utility functions
useful in building various applications and widgets.
	Xaw: The Athena Widget Set is the MIT-implemented sample widget set
distributed with X11 source.
	Xm: The OSF/Motif widget set from the Open Software Foundation; binary
kits are available from many hardware vendors.
	Xhp (Xw): The Hewlett-Packard Widget Set was originally based on R2++, 
but several sets of patches exist which bring it up to R3, as it is distributed
on the X11R4 tapes. Supplemental patches are available to use it with R4/R5.
	CLX: The Common Lisp X Interface is a Common Lisp equivalent to Xlib.
	XDMCP: The X Display Manager Protocol provides a uniform mechanism for 
a display such as an X terminal to request login service from a remote host.
	XLFD: The X Logical Font Description Conventions describes a standard
logical font description and conventions to be used by clients so that they
can query and access those resources.
	RTFM: Common expert-speak meaning "please locate and consult the 
relevant documentation -- Read the Forgotten Manual".
	UTSL: A common expression meaning "take advantage of the fact that you 
aren't limited by a binary license -- Use The Source, Luke".
	API: Application-Programmer Interface. The function calls, etc., in
a programming library.
	BDF: Bitmap Distribution Format; a human-readable format for uncompiled
X fonts.
	GUI: graphical user interface.
	UIL: the User Interface Language, part of OSF/Motif which lets 
programmers specify a widget hierarchy in a simple "outline" form
	WCL: the Widget Creation Language, a package which extends the 
understanding of the Xt resource format such that a widget hierarchy and 
actions on the widgets can be specified through the resources file
	GIL: the file format put out by Sun's OpenWindows Developers Guide 3.0
	UIMS: User Interface Management System

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	The Inter-Client Communication Conventions Manual is one of the 
official X Consortium standards documents that define the X environment. It 
describes the conventions that clients must observe to coexist peacefully with 
other clients sharing the same server.  If you are writing X clients, you need 
to read and understand the ICCCM,  in particular the sections discussing the 
selection mechanism and the interaction between your client and the window 
manager.  Get it either:
	- as part of the R4 distribution from MIT
	- in the later editions of the Scheifler/Gettys "X Window System" book
	- as an appendix in the new version of O'Reilly's Volume 0, "X Protocol
Reference Manual." A version in old copies of their Volume 1 is obsolete.
	The version in the Digital Press book is much more readable, thanks to 
the efforts of Digital Press's editors to improve the English and the 
presentation.

[from David Rosenthal, 10/90]

	- the ICCCM was updated for R5; updates are published in O'Reilly's
"Programmer's Supplement for Release 5". The complete document is on the R5
tapes.

	Alternate definition: the ICCCM is generally the M in "RTFM" and is
the most-important of the least-read X documents.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	The MIT X Consortium was formed in January of 1988 to further the
development of the X Window System and has as its major goal the promotion of 
cooperation within the computer industry in the creation of standard software 
interfaces at all layers in the X Window System environment.
	MIT's role is to provide the vendor-neutral architectural and 
administrative leadership required to make this work. Membership in the 
Consortium open to any organization.  There are two categories of membership, 
Member (for large organizations) and Affiliate (for smaller organizations).
	Most of the Consortium's activities take place via electronic mail, 
with meetings when required.  As designs and specifications take shape,
interest groups are formed from experts in the participating organizations.  
Typically a small multi-organization architecture team leads the design, with 
others acting as close observers and reviewers.  Once a complete specification
is produced, it may be submitted for formal technical review by the Consortium
as a proposed standard.  The standards process typically includes public 
review (outside the Consortium) and a demonstration of proof of concept.
	Your involvement in the public review process or as a Member or 
Affiliate of the Consortium is welcomed.
	Write to: Bob Scheifler, MIT X Consortium, Laboratory for Computer 
Science, 545 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139.

[For complete information see the XCONSORTIUM man page from the X11R4
distribution, from which this information is adapted.] [2/90]

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	OPEN LOOK and Motif are two graphical user interfaces (GUIs). OPEN LOOK
was developed by Sun with help from AT&T and many industry reviewers; Motif was
developed by the Open Software Foundation (OSF) with input from many OSF 
members. 

	OPEN LOOK is primarily a user-interface specification and style-guide; 
there are several toolkits which can be used to produce OPEN LOOK applications.
Motif includes an API specification; the only sanctioned Motif toolkit is the 
one from OSF. However, there are other toolkits which can be used to produce 
programs which look and behave like OSF/Motif; one of these, ParcPlace's 
(formerly Solbourne's) OI, is a "virtual toolkit" which provides objects in the
style of OPEN LOOK and Motif, at the user's choice.

	OPEN LOOK GUI is also the name of a product from AT&T, comprising 
their OPEN LOOK Intrinsics Toolkit and a variety of applications.

[Thanks to Ian Darwin, ian@sq.com, 5/91]

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	Open Windows (3.0) is a Sun product that encompasses: a window system 
that combines a NeWS and X11-compliant server (X/NeWS); a user-interface 
specification (OPEN LOOK) and a series of toolkits that implement it (including
the SunView-like XView and the Xt-based OLIT); Xlib and Xt implementations; and
a number of utilities (olwm window manager, filemgr, shelltool, etc.).

[thanks to Frank Greco (fgreco@govt.shearson.COM), 8/90; 4/92] 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	DECWindows is a DEC product that encompasses: an X11 server; the XUI 
toolkit, including the Dwt widget set and UIL; Xlib and Xt implementations; a 
session manager; and a number of utilities (dxwm window manager, dxcalendar, 
dxpsview, etc.).

(At some point Motif flavors of the toolkit and applications will be shipped.)
[8/90] 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	PEX is the "PHiGS Extension to X".
	PHiGS stands for "Programmer's Hierarchical Interactive Graphics 
System" and is essentially a library of functions that simplifies the creation 
and manipulation of 3D graphics. Many platforms are capable of performing in 
hardware the computations involved in rendering 3D objects; the extension 
allows the client (PHiGS in this case) to take advantage of the specialized 
hardware for 3D graphics.
	Sun Microsystems is currently contracted to develop a freely 
redistributable (copyright similar to the current X copyright) sample
implementation.  Source and documentation are available in the R5 release.
Several vendors are currently selling independently-developed PEX servers for 
their workstations and X terminals.

[last modified 10/91]

----------------------------------------------------------------------

There are several options for using X over serial lines:

SLIP - Serial Line IP; this is both a mechanism and a protocol for sending IP
packets over point-to-point serial links. It has been around for several years,
and implementations are available for many of the major TCP/IP implementations.
Most X Terminal vendors supply this as a checkoff item, although nobody really 
ever uses it since it is horribly slow.  The TCP/IP headers add 40 bytes per 
packet and the TCP/IP encoding of the X protocol is rather verbose (rightfully 
so; it is optimized for packing and unpacking over high-speed links). 

CSLIP - Compressed header SLIP; this is a variant of SLIP that compresses the 
40 bytes of TCP/IP headers down to about 5 or 6 bytes.  It still doesn't do 
anything about reencoding the X protocol.  Modems that do compression can help,
but they increase packet latency (it takes time to dribble the uncompressed 
data through typical serial interfaces, plus the compression assembly time).

PPP - Point-to-Point Protocol; this is an emerging standard for point-to-point
links over serial lines that has a more complete set of option negotiation than
SLIP.  A growing number of people see the combination of PPP for the serial 
line management and CSLIP for the header compression as becoming common for 
running normal TCP/IP protocols over serial lines.  Running raw X over the wire
still needs compression somewhere to make it usable.

XRemote - this is the name of both a protocol and set of products originally
developed by NCD for squeezing the X protocol over serial lines.  In addition 
to using a low level transport mechanism similar to PPP/CSLIP, XRemote removes 
redundancies in the X protocol by sending deltas against previous packets and 
using LZW to compress the entire data stream.  This work is done by either a 
pseudo-X server or "proxy" running on the host or in a terminal server.  There 
are several advantages to doing compression outside the modem:
   (1)	You don't *have* to have compressing modems in there if you wouldn't 
	otherwise be using them (e.g. if you were going to be directly 
	connected), and
   (2)	It reduces the I/O overhead by cutting down on the number of bytes that
	have to cross the serial interface, and
   (3)	In addition to the effects of #2, it reduces the latency in delivering 
	packets by not requiring the modem to buffer up the data waiting for 
	blocks to compress.

LBX - Low Bandwidth X; this is an X Consortium project that is working on a
standard for this area.  It is being chaired by NCD and Xerox and is using 
NCD's XRemote protocol as a stepping stone in developing the new protocol.  LBX
will go beyond XRemote by adding proxy caching of commonly-used information 
(e.g. connection setup data, large window properties, font metrics, keymaps, 
etc.) and a more efficient encoding of the X protocol. The hope is to have a 
Standard ready for public review in the first half of next year and a sample 
implementation available in R6.

Additional technical information about how XRemote works and a few notes on how
LBX might be different are available via anonymous ftp from export.lcs.mit.edu
in contrib/ in the following files:
        XRemote-slides.ps               slides describing XRemote
        XRemote-LBX-diffs.ps            more slides describing some of LBX

[information provided by Jim Fulton, jim@ncd.com; 7/92]

	There is also a set of slides on export from Jim Fulton's talk at
the 7th MIT X Technical Conference.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------

	The window manager in X is just another client -- it is not part of the
X window system, although it enjoys special privileges -- and so there is
no single window manager; instead, there are many which support different ways 
for the user to interact with windows and different styles of window layout,
decoration, and keyboard and colormap focus. In approximate chronological order
(generally, the more recent ones are more conformant with the ICCCM):

	wm: this simple title-bar window manager was phased out in R2 or R3
	uwm: the Universal Window Manager is still popular for its speed, 
although it is very outdated. Moved to contrib/ on the R4 tape.
	twm (old): Tom's Window Manager was among the first non-MIT window 
managers and offered the user a great deal of customization options in a
re-parenting window manager. 
	awm: the Ardent Window Manager remains a hotbed for hackers and offers
some features (dynamic menus) not found on more current window managers
	cwm: cwm is part of the Andrew system. 
	rtl: Siemen's window manager tiles windows so that they don't overlap
and resizes the window with the focus to its preferred size.
	dxwm: Digital's dxwm is part of the DECwindows offering
	hpwm: HP's window manager offers a 3D look; it is a precursor of mwm
	mwm: the Motif window manager is part of the OSF/Motif toolkit
	tekwm: Tektronix's window manager offering 
	olwm (Sun): olwm implements the OPEN LOOK GUI and some of the Style
Guide functionality
	olwm (AT&T): ditto
	gwm: Bull's Generic Window Manager emulates others with a built-in
Lisp interpreter. Version 1.7h (10/91) is on the R5 contrib tape; 1.7n is on
avahi.inria.fr and export.lcs.mit.edu. [3/93]
	m_swm: the Sigma window manager is on the R4 tape
	pswm: Sun's PostScript-based pswm is part of the OpenWindows release
	swm: Solbourne's swm is based on the OI toolkit and offers multiple
GUI support and also a panned virtual window; configuration information comes
from the resources file
	twm (new): MIT's new Tab Window Manager from the R4 tape is a reworked
twm and is the basis for several derivatives, including the one on the R5 tape
	vtwm: vtwm offers some of the virtual-desktop features of swm, with a
single-root window implementation; it is based on the R4 twm and is available
on archive servers. A new version, vtwm-5.0, is based on R5.9 and is available 
from export. [3/92]
	tvtwm: Tom's Virtual Tab Window Manager is also based on the R4 twm
and provides a virtual desktop modeled on the virtual-root window of swm. It is
available on archive servers
	olvwm: the vtwm-style virtual-desktop added to Sun's olwm. It is 
available on archive servers; version 3.3 [1/93] is on export.
	mvwm: the vtwm-style virtual-desktop added to OSF's mwm. A beta version
is floating around (most recently from suresh@unipalm.co.uk) but requires a 
source license to OSF/Motif 1.1.3 [3/92].
	NCDwm: the window manager local to NCD terminals offers an mwm look 
	XDSwm: the window manager local to Visual Technology's terminals 
	ctwm: Claude Lecommandeur's (lecom@sic.epfl.ch) modification of the R5 
twm offers 32 virtual screens in the fashion of HP vuewm; source is on export.
Version 2.2.2 [2/93] also offers the window overview used in vtwm and tvtwm.
	vuewm: HP's MWM-based window manager offers configurable workspaces.
	4Dwm: SGI's enhanced MWM
	piewm: this version of tvtwm offers pie menus

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	It needn't.  What is probably happening is that you are running your 
window manager as the last job in your .xsession or .xinitrc file; your X 
session runs only as long as the last job is running, and so killing your 
window manager is equivalent to logging out. Instead, run the window manager in
the background, and as the last job instead invoke something safe like:
		exec xterm -name Login -rv -iconic
or any special client of your devising which exits on some user action.
Your X session will continue until you explicitly logout of this window, 
whether or not you kill or restart your window manager.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	Although no known window manager directly supports such a feature --
which may be equivalent to writing out a .xinitrc or .xsession file naming the
geometry and WM_COMMAND of each application (but olvwm may have something 
close) -- there is a contributed application which does much of what you are 
looking for, although it is not as complete as the SunView program toolplaces. 
Look for the application "xplaces" on an archive-server near you. There are 
several versions of this program floating around; look for a recent vintage.
[10/90]
	Some new pseudo session-managers such as HP's vuewm provide for the 
saving of sessions including information on the geometry of currently-running
applications and the resource database. 
[Bjxrn Stabell (bjoerns@staff.cs.uit.no); 3/93.]
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------

	DEC's session manager will start dxwm up by default. To override this, 
add to your .Xdefaults file something like this line, naming the full pathname:
	sm.windowManagerName:   /wherever/usr/bin/X11/your_favorite_wm

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	You can turn auto-repeat on or off by using "xset r on|off". The X
protocol, however, doesn't provide for varying the auto-repeat rate, which is
a capability not supported by all systems.
	Some servers running on systems that support this, however, may provide
command-line flags to set the rate at start-up time. If you have control over 
server start-up (see the man pages for xinit and xdm), you can invoke the 
server with the chosen settings; for example, you can start the Xsun server 
from MIT with the options "-ar1 350 -ar2 30" to reduce the sensitivity of the 
keyboard.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

	There is no method of arranging for a particular string to be
produced when you press a particular key. The xmodmap client, which is useful 
for moving your CTRL and ESC keys to useful places, just rearranges keys and 
does not do "macro expansion."
	Some (few) clients, including xterm and several X-based editors, 
accept a translation resource such as:
	xterm*VT100.Translations: #override \
		F1: string("setenv DISPLAY unix:0")
which permits the shorthand F1 to be pressed to reset the display locally
within an xterm; it takes effect for new xterm clients. To include control
characters in the string, use \nnn, where nnn is the octal encoding of the
control character you want to include.
	Window managers, which could provide this facility, do not yet; nor
has a special "remapper" client been made available.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

David B. Lewis 					faq%craft@uunet.uu.net

		"Just the FAQs, ma'am." -- Joe Friday 
-- 
David B. Lewis		Temporarily at but not speaking for Visual, Inc.
day: dbl@visual.com	evening: david%craft@uunet.uu.net

File 32/1144: disp135 [0/7] (85.9%)




I have posted disp135.zip to alt.binaries.pictures.utilities


******   You may distribute this program freely for non-commercial use
         if no fee is gained.
******   There is no warranty. The author is not responsible for any
         damage caused by this program.


Important changes since version 1.30:
    Fix bugs in file management system (file displaying).
    Improve file management system (more user-friendly).
    Fix bug in XPM version 3 reading.
    Fix bugs in TARGA reading/writng.
    Fix bug in GEM/IMG reading.
    Add support for PCX and GEM/IMG writing.
    Auto-skip macbinary header.


(1) Introduction:
  This program can let you READ, WRITE and DISPLAY images with different
  formats. It also let you do some special effects(ROTATION, DITHERING ....)
  on image. Its main purpose is to let you convert image among different
  formts.
  Include simple file management system.
  Support 'slide show'.
  There is NO LIMIT on image size.
  Currently this program supports 8, 15, 16, 24 bits display.
  If you want to use HiColor or TrueColor, you must have VESA driver.
  If you want to modify video driver, please read section (8).


(2) Hardware Requirement:
  PC 386 or better. MSDOS 3.3 or higher.
  min amount of ram is 4M bytes(Maybe less memory will also work).
  (I recommend min 8M bytes for better performance).
  Hard disk for swapping(virtual memory).

  The following description is borrowed from DJGPP.

  Supported Wares:

  * Up to 128M of extended memory (expanded under VCPI)
  * Up to 128M of disk space used for swapping
  * SuperVGA 256-color mode up to 1024x768
  * 80387
  * XMS & VDISK memory allocation strategies
  * VCPI programs, such as QEMM, DESQview, and 386MAX

  Unsupported:

  * DPMI
  * Microsoft Windows

  Features: 80387 emulator, 32-bit unix-ish environment, flat memory
  model, SVGA graphics.


(3) Installation:
  Video drivers, emu387 and go32.exe are borrowed from DJGPP.
  (If you use Western Digital VGA chips, read readme.wd)
  (This GO32.EXE is a modified version for vesa and is COMPLETELY compatible
   with original version)
+  *** But some people report that this go32.exe is not compatible with
+      other DJGPP programs in their system. If you encounter this problem,
+      DON'T put go32.exe within search path.

  *** Please read runme.bat for how to run this program.

  If you choose xxxxx.grn as video driver, add 'nc 256' to environment
    GO32.

  For example, go32=driver x:/xxxxx/xxxxx.grn nc 256

  If you don't have 80x87, add 'emu x:/xxxxx/emu387' to environment GO32.

  For example, go32=driver x:/xxxxx/xxxxx.grd emu x:/xxxxx/emu387

  **** Notes: 1. I only test tr8900.grn, et4000.grn and vesa.grn.
                 Other drivers are not tested.
              2. I have modified et4000.grn to support 8, 15, 16, 24 bits
                 display. You don't need to use vesa driver.
                 If et4000.grn doesn't work, please try vesa.grn.
              3. For those who want to use HiColor or TrueColor display,
                 please use vesa.grn(except et4000 users).
                 You can find vesa BIOS driver from :
                   wuarchive.wustl.edu: /mirrors/msdos/graphics
                   godzilla.cgl.rmit.oz.au: /kjb/MGL


(4) Command Line Switch:

+   Usage : display [-d|--display initial_display_type]
+                   [-s|--sort sort_method]
+                   [-h|-?]

    Display type: 8(SVGA,default), 15, 16(HiColor), 24(TrueColor)
+   Sort method: 'name', 'ext'


(5) Function Key:

    F2 : Change disk drive

+   CTRL-A -- CTRL-Z : change disk drive.

    F3 : Change filename mask (See match.doc)

    F4 : Change parameters

    F5 : Some effects on picture, eg. flip, rotate ....

    F7 : Make Directory

    t : Tag file

    + : Tag group files (See match.doc)

    T : Tag all files

    u : Untag file

    - : Untag group files (See match.doc)

    U : Untag all files

    Ins : Change display type (8,15,16,24) in 'read' & 'screen' menu.

    F6,m,M : Move file(s)

    F8,d,D : Delete file(s)

    r,R : Rename file

    c,C : Copy File(s)

    z,Z : Display first 10 bytes in Ascii, Hex and Dec modes.

+   f,F : Display disk free space.

    Page Up/Down : Move one page

    TAB : Change processing target.

    Arrow keys, Home, End, Page Up, Page Down: Scroll image.
      Home: Left Most.
      End: Right Most.
      Page Up: Top Most.
      Page Down: Bottom Most.
      in 'screen' & 'effect' menu :
        Left,Right arrow: Change display type(8, 15, 16, 24 bits)

    s,S : Slide Show. ESCAPE to terminate.

    ALT-X : Quit program without prompting.

+   ALT-A : Reread directory.

    Escape : Abort function and return.


(6) Support Format:

  Read: GIF(.gif), Japan MAG(.mag), Japan PIC(.pic), Sun Raster(.ras),
        Jpeg(.jpg), XBM(.xbm), Utah RLE(.rle), PBM(.pbm), PGM(.pgm),
        PPM(.ppm), PM(.pm), PCX(.pcx), Japan MKI(.mki), Tiff(.tif),
        Targa(.tga), XPM(.xpm), Mac Paint(.mac), GEM/IMG(.img),
        IFF/ILBM(.lbm), Window BMP(.bmp), QRT ray tracing(.qrt),
        Mac PICT(.pct), VIS(.vis), PDS(.pds), VIKING(.vik), VICAR(.vic),
        FITS(.fit), Usenix FACE(.fac).

        the extensions in () are standard extensions.

  Write: GIF, Sun Raster, Jpeg, XBM, PBM, PGM, PPM, PM, Tiff, Targa,
         XPM, Mac Paint, Ascii, Laser Jet, IFF/ILBM, Window BMP,
+        Mac PICT, VIS, FITS, FACE, PCX, GEM/IMG.

  All Read/Write support full color(8 bits), grey scale, b/w dither,
      and 24 bits image, if allowed for that format.


(7) Detail:

   Initialization:
      Set default display type to highest display type.
      Find allowable screen resolution(for .grn video driver only).

   1. When you run this program, you will enter 'read' menu. Whthin this
      menu you can press any function key except F5. If you move or copy
      files, you will enter 'write' menu. the 'write' menu is much like
      'read' menu, but only allow you to change directory.
+       The header line in 'read' menu includes "(d:xx,f:xx,t:xx)".
+         d : display type. f: number of files. t: number of tagged files.
      pressing SPACE in 'read' menu will let you select which format to use
        for reading current file.
      pressing RETURN in 'read' menu will let you reading current file. This
        program will automatically determine which format this file is.
        The procedure is: First, check magic number. If fail, check
        standard extension. Still fail, report error.
      pressing s or S in 'read' menu will do 'Slide Show'.
        If delay time is 0, program will wait until you hit a key
          (except ESCAPE).
        If any error occurs, program will make a beep.
        ESCAPE to terminate.
      pressing Ins in 'read' menu will change display type.
      pressing ALT-X in 'read' menu will quit program without prompting.

   2. Once image file is successfully read, you will enter 'screen' menu.
      Within this menu F5 is turn on. You can do special effect on image.
      pressing RETURN: show image.
        in graphic mode, press RETURN, SPACE or ESCAPE to return to text
        mode.
      pressing TAB: change processing target. This program allows you to do
        special effects on 8-bit or 24-bit image.
      pressing Left,Right arrow: change display type. 8, 15, 16, 24 bits.
      pressing SPACE: save current image to file.
        B/W Dither: save as black/white image(1 bit).
        Grey Scale: save as grey image(8 bits).
        Full Color: save as color image(8 bits).
        True Color: save as 24-bit image.

        This program will ask you some questions if you want to write image
        to file. Some questions are format-dependent. Finally This program
        will prompt you a filename. If you want to save file under another
        directory other than current directory, please press SPACE. after
        pressing SPACE, you will enter 'write2' menu. You can change
        directory to what you want. Then,

        pressing SPACE: this program will prompt you 'original' filename.
        pressing RETURN: this program will prompt you 'selected' filename
                      (filename under bar).


  3. This program supports 8, 15, 16, 24 bits display.

  4. This Program is MEMORY GREEDY. If you don't have enough memory,
     the performance is poor.

  5. If you want to save 8 bits image :
       try GIF then TIFF(LZW) then TARGA then Sun Raster then BMP then ...

     If you want to save 24 bits image (lossless):
       try TIFF(LZW) or TARGA or ILBM or Sun Raster
       (No one is better for true 24bits image)

  6. I recommend Jpeg for storing 24 bits images, even 8 bits images.

  7. Not all subroutines are fully tested

  8. This document is not well written. If you have any PROBLEM, SUGGESTION,
     COMMENT about this program,
     Please send to u7711501@bicmos.ee.nctu.edu.tw (140.113.11.13).
     I need your suggestion to improve this program.
     (There is NO anonymous ftp on this site)


(8) Tech. information:
  Program (user interface and some subroutines) written by Jih-Shin Ho.
  Some subroutines are borrowed from XV(2.21) and PBMPLUS(dec 91).
  Tiff(V3.2) and Jpeg(V4) reading/writing are through public domain
    libraries.
  Compiled with DJGPP.
  You can get whole DJGPP package from SIMTEL20 or mirror sites.
    For example, wuarchive.wustl.edu: /mirrors/msdos/djgpp


(9) For Thoese who want to modify video driver:
   1. get GRX source code from SIMTEL20 or mirror sites.
   2. For HiColor and TrueColor:
        15 bits : # of colors is set to 32768.
        16 bits : # of colors is set to 0xc010.
        24 bits : # of colors is set to 0xc018.


  I would like to thank the authors of XV and PBMPLUS for their permission
    to let me use their subroutines.
  Also I will thank the authors who write Tiff and Jpeg libraries.
  Thank DJ. Without DJGPP I can't do any thing on PC.


                                            Jih-Shin Ho
                                   u7711501@bicmos.ee.nctu.edu.tw

File 33/1144: disp140 [0/7] (86.0%)



I have posted DISP140.ZIP to alt.binaries.pictures.utilities.
I will upload this package to SIMTEL20 later.

******   You may distribute this program freely for non-commercial use
         if no fee is gained.
******   There is no warranty. The author is not responsible for any
         damage caused by this program.

Important changes since Version 1.35:
  Added support for IRIS.
  Support Mix/Concat. two images.
  Added support for 'batch conversion'.
  Added support for 'load/save palette table'.
  Added support for 'edge enhance'.
  Added support for 'crop one line'.
  Added support for 'negate image'.
  New color quantization option.
  Fix some minor bugs.

(1) Introduction:
  This program can let you READ, WRITE and DISPLAY images with different
  formats. It also let you do some special effects(ROTATION, DITHERING ....)
  on image. Its main purpose is to let you convert image among different
  formts.
  Include simple file management system.
  Support 'slide show'.
+ Support 'batch conversion'.
  There is NO LIMIT on image size.
  Currently this program supports 8, 15, 16, 24 bits display.
  If you want to use HiColor or TrueColor, you must have VESA driver.
  If you want to modify video driver, please read section (8).


(2) Hardware Requirement:
  PC 386 or better. MSDOS 3.3 or higher.
  min amount of ram is 4M bytes(Maybe less memory will also work).
  (I recommend min 8M bytes for better performance).
  Hard disk for swapping(virtual memory).

  The following description is borrowed from DJGPP.

  Supported Wares:

  * Up to 128M of extended memory (expanded under VCPI)
  * Up to 128M of disk space used for swapping
  * SuperVGA 256-color mode up to 1024x768
  * 80387
  * XMS & VDISK memory allocation strategies
  * VCPI programs, such as QEMM, DESQview, and 386MAX

  Unsupported:

  * DPMI
  * Microsoft Windows

  Features: 80387 emulator, 32-bit unix-ish environment, flat memory
  model, SVGA graphics.


(3) Installation:
  Video drivers, emu387 and go32.exe are borrowed from DJGPP.
  (If you use Western Digital VGA chips, read readme.wd)
  (This GO32.EXE is a modified version for vesa and is COMPLETELY compatible
   with original version)
  *** But some people report that this go32.exe is not compatible with
      other DJGPP programs in their system. If you encounter this problem,
      DON'T put go32.exe within search path.

  *** Please read runme.bat for how to run this program.

  If you choose xxxxx.grn as video driver, add 'nc 256' to environment
    GO32.

  For example, go32=driver x:/xxxxx/xxxxx.grn nc 256

  If you don't have 80x87, add 'emu x:/xxxxx/emu387' to environment GO32.

  For example, go32=driver x:/xxxxx/xxxxx.grd emu x:/xxxxx/emu387

  **** Notes: 1. I only test tr8900.grn, et4000.grn and vesa.grn.
                 Other drivers are not tested.
              2. I have modified et4000.grn to support 8, 15, 16, 24 bits
                 display. You don't need to use vesa driver.
                 If et4000.grn doesn't work, please try vesa.grn.
              3. For those who want to use HiColor or TrueColor display,
                 please use vesa.grn(except et4000 users).
                 You can find vesa BIOS driver from :
                   wuarchive.wustl.edu: /mirrors/msdos/graphics
                   godzilla.cgl.rmit.oz.au: /kjb/MGL


(4) Command Line Switch:

    Usage : display [-d|--display initial_display_type]
                    [-s|--sort sort_method]
                    [-h|-?]

    Display type: 8(SVGA,default), 15, 16(HiColor), 24(TrueColor)
    Sort method: 'name', 'ext'


(5) Function Key:

    F2 : Change disk drive.

    CTRL-A -- CTRL-Z : change disk drive.

    F3 : Change filename mask. (See match.doc)

    F4 : Change parameters.

    F5 : Some effects on picture, eg. flip, rotate ....

    F7 : Make Directory.

    t : Tag file.

    + : Tag group files. (See match.doc)

    T : Tag all files.

    u : Untag file.

    - : Untag group files. (See match.doc)

    U : Untag all files.

    Ins : Change display type (8,15,16,24) in 'read' & 'screen' menu.

    F6,m,M : Move file(s).

+   ALT-M : Move single file(ignore tag).

    F8,d,D : Delete file(s).

+   ALT-D : Delete single file(ignore tag).

    r,R : Rename file.

    c,C : Copy File(s).

+   ALT-C : Copy single file(ignore tag).

    z,Z : Display first 10 bytes in Ascii, Hex and Dec modes.

    f,F : Display disk free space.

    Page Up/Down : Move one page.

    TAB : Change processing target.

    Arrow keys, Home, End, Page Up, Page Down: Scroll image.
      Home: Left Most.
      End: Right Most.
      Page Up: Top Most.
      Page Down: Bottom Most.
      in 'screen' & 'effect' menu :
        Left,Right arrow: Change display type(8, 15, 16, 24 bits).

+   CTRL-Arrow keys : Crop image by one line(in graphics mode).

    s,S : Slide Show(show tagged files). ESCAPE to terminate.

+   b,B : Batch conversion(convert tagged files to single format).

+   w,W : Wait/Pause in slide show.

    ALT-X : Quit program without prompting.

    ALT-A : Reread directory.

    Escape : Abort function and return.


(6) Support Format:

  Read: GIF(.gif), Japan MAG(.mag), Japan PIC(.pic), Sun Raster(.ras),
        Jpeg(.jpg), XBM(.xbm), Utah RLE(.rle), PBM(.pbm), PGM(.pgm),
        PPM(.ppm), PM(.pm), PCX(.pcx), Japan MKI(.mki), Tiff(.tif),
        Targa(.tga), XPM(.xpm), Mac Paint(.mac), GEM/IMG(.img),
        IFF/ILBM(.lbm), Window BMP(.bmp), QRT ray tracing(.qrt),
        Mac PICT(.pct), VIS(.vis), PDS(.pds), VIKING(.vik), VICAR(.vic),
+       FITS(.fit), Usenix FACE(.fac), IRIS(.sgi).

        the extensions in () are standard extensions.

  Write: GIF, Sun Raster, Jpeg, XBM, PBM, PGM, PPM, PM, Tiff, Targa,
         XPM, Mac Paint, Ascii, Laser Jet, IFF/ILBM, Window BMP,
+        Mac PICT, VIS, FITS, FACE, PCX, GEM/IMG, IRIS.

  All Read/Write support full color(8 bits), grey scale, b/w dither,
      and 24 bits image, if allowed for that format.


(7) Detail:

   Initialization:
      Set default display type to highest display type.
      Find allowable screen resolution(for .grn video driver only).

   1. When you run this program, you will enter 'read' menu. Whthin this
      menu you can press any function key. If you move or copy
      files, you will enter 'write' menu. the 'write' menu is much like
      'read' menu, but only allow you to change directory.
      The header line in 'read' menu includes "(d:xx,f:xx,t:xx)".
        d : display type. f: number of files. t: number of tagged files.
      pressing SPACE in 'read' menu will let you select which format to use
        for reading current file.
      pressing RETURN in 'read' menu will let you reading current file. This
        program will automatically determine which format this file is.
        The procedure is: First, check magic number. If fail, check
        standard extension. Still fail, report error.
      pressing s or S in 'read' menu will do 'Slide Show'.
        If delay time is 0, program will wait until you hit a key
          (except ESCAPE).
        If any error occurs, program will make a beep.
+       'w' or 'W' to pause, any key to continue.
        ESCAPE to terminate.
      pressing Ins in 'read' menu will change display type.
      pressing ALT-X in 'read' menu will quit program without prompting.
+     pressing F5 will turn on 'effect' menu.

   2. Once image file is successfully read, you will enter 'screen' menu.
      You can do special effect on image.
      pressing RETURN: show image.
        in graphic mode, press RETURN, SPACE or ESCAPE to return to text
        mode.
      pressing TAB: change processing target. This program allows you to do
        special effects on 8-bit or 24-bit image.
      pressing Left,Right arrow: change display type. 8, 15, 16, 24 bits.
      pressing SPACE: save current image to file.
        B/W Dither: save as black/white image(1 bit).
        Grey Scale: save as grey image(8 bits).
        Full Color: save as color image(8 bits).
        True Color: save as 24-bit image.

        This program will ask you some questions if you want to write image
        to file. Some questions are format-dependent. Finally This program
        will prompt you a filename. If you want to save file under another
        directory other than current directory, please press SPACE. after
        pressing SPACE, you will enter 'write2' menu. You can change
        directory to what you want. Then,

        pressing SPACE: this program will prompt you 'original' filename.
        pressing RETURN: this program will prompt you 'selected' filename
                      (filename under bar).


  3. This program supports 8, 15, 16, 24 bits display.

  4. This Program is MEMORY GREEDY. If you don't have enough memory,
     the performance is poor.

  5. If you want to save 8 bits image :
       try GIF then TIFF(LZW) then TARGA then Sun Raster then BMP then ...

     If you want to save 24 bits image (lossless):
       try TIFF(LZW) or TARGA or ILBM or Sun Raster
       (No one is better for true 24bits image)

  6. I recommend Jpeg for storing 24 bits images, even 8 bits images.

  7. Not all subroutines are fully tested

  8. This document is not well written. If you have any PROBLEM, SUGGESTION,
     COMMENT about this program,
     Please send to u7711501@bicmos.ee.nctu.edu.tw (140.113.11.13).
     I need your suggestion to improve this program.
     (There is NO anonymous ftp on this site)


(8) Tech. information:
  Program (user interface and some subroutines) written by Jih-Shin Ho.
  Some subroutines are borrowed from XV(2.21) and PBMPLUS(dec 91).
  Tiff(V3.2) and Jpeg(V4) reading/writing are through public domain
    libraries.
  Compiled with DJGPP.
  You can get whole DJGPP package from SIMTEL20 or mirror sites.
    For example, wuarchive.wustl.edu: /mirrors/msdos/djgpp


(9) For Thoese who want to modify video driver:
   1. get GRX source code from SIMTEL20 or mirror sites.
   2. For HiColor and TrueColor:
        15 bits : # of colors is set to 32768.
        16 bits : # of colors is set to 0xc010.
        24 bits : # of colors is set to 0xc018.


  I would like to thank the authors of XV and PBMPLUS for their permission
    to let me use their subroutines.
  Also I will thank the authors who write Tiff and Jpeg libraries.
  Thank DJ. Without DJGPP I can't do any thing on PC.


                                            Jih-Shin Ho
                                   u7711501@bicmos.ee.nctu.edu.tw

File 34/1144: Re: Is there an FTP achive for USGS terrain data (85.2%)


>
>[A lot of interesting stuff about gopher - deleted]
>
>>If you've never heard of gopher don't worry it's free and on the net,
>>write me a note if you'd like information on how to get started.
>>
>>
>>Best of luck,
>>
>>Dan Jacobson
>>
>>danj@welchgate.welch.jhu.edu
>
>
>I've heard of it but lost the intro posting that came out a while back -
>could you post it again?  I think it's of general interest.
>
>
>Ben
>-- 
>Ben Olasov		olasov@cs.columbia.edu



This is a heavily edited/modified version of the Gopher FAQ intended to
give people just starting with gopher enough information to get a
client and jump into Gopher-space - a complete version can be obtained
as described below.  Once you have a gopher client point it at 
merlot.welch.jhu.edu and welcome to gopher-space!


Dan Jacobson

danj@welchgate.welch.jhu.edu

-----

Common Questions and Answers about the Internet Gopher, a
client/server protocol for making a world wide information service,
with many implementations.  Posted to comp.infosystems.gopher, 
comp.answers, and news.answers every two weeks.

The most recent version of this FAQ can be gotten through gopher, or
via anonymous ftp:

rtfm.mit.edu:/pub/usenet/news.answers/gopher-faq

Those without FTP access should send e-mail to mail-server@rtfm.mit.edu
with "send usenet/news.answers/finding-sources" in the body to find out
how to do FTP by e-mail.

------------------------------------------------------------------- 
List of questions in the Gopher FAQ:

Q0:  What is Gopher?
Q1:  Where can I get Gopher software?
Q2:  What do I need to access Gopher?
Q3:  Where are there publicly available logins for Gopher?
Q4:  Who Develops Gopher Software?
Q5: What is the relationship between Gopher and (WAIS, WWW, ftp)?
Q6: Are papers or articles describing Gopher available?
Q7: What is veronica?
Q8: What is Available for Biology?
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Q0:  What is Gopher?

A0:  The Internet Gopher client/server provides a distributed
     information delivery system around which a world/campus-wide
     information system (CWIS) can readily be constructed.   While
     providing a delivery vehicle for local information,  Gopher
     facilitates access to other Gopher and information servers
     throughout the world. 

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Q1:  Where can I get Gopher software?

A1:  via anonymous ftp to boombox.micro.umn.edu.  Look in the directory
     /pub/gopher

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Q2:  What do I need to access Gopher?

A2:  You will need a gopher "client" program that runs on your local PC
     or workstation

     There are clients for the following systems.  The directory
     following the name is the location of the client on the anonymous
     ftp site boombox.micro.umn.edu (134.84.132.2) in the directory
     /pub/gopher.

      Unix Curses & Emacs   :  /pub/gopher/Unix/gopher1.12.tar.Z
      Xwindows (athena)     :  /pub/gopher/Unix/xgopher1.2.tar.Z
      Xwindows (Motif)      :  /pub/gopher/Unix/moog
      Xwindows (Xview)      :  /pub/gopher/Unix/xvgopher
      Macintosh Hypercard   :  /pub/gopher/Macintosh-TurboGopher/old-versions *
      Macintosh Application :  /pub/gopher/Macintosh-TurboGopher *
      DOS w/Clarkson Driver :  /pub/gopher/PC_client/
      NeXTstep              :  /pub/gopher/NeXT/
      VM/CMS                :  /pub/gopher/Rice_CMS/ or /pub/gopher/VieGOPHER/
      VMS                   :  /pub/gopher/VMS/
      OS/2 2.0	            :  /pub/gopher/os2/
      MVS/XA                :  /pub/gopher/mvs/

     Many other clients and servers have been developed by others, the
     following is an attempt at a comprehensive list.  

      A Microsoft Windows Winsock client "The Gopher Book"
        sunsite.unc.edu:/pub/micro/pc-stuff/ms-windows/winsock/goph_tbk.zip

      A Macintosh Application, "MacGopher".
        ftp.cc.utah.edu:/pub/gopher/Macintosh *

      Another Macintosh application, "GopherApp".
        ftp.bio.indiana.edu:/util/gopher/gopherapp *

      A port of the UNIX curses client for DOS with PC/TCP
        oac.hsc.uth.tmc.edu:/public/dos/misc/dosgopher.exe

      A port of the UNIX curses client for PC-NFS
     	 bcm.tmc.edu:/nfs/gopher.exe

      A beta version of the PC Gopher client for Novell's LAN Workplace
      for DOS
         lennon.itn.med.umich.edu:/dos/gopher

      A VMS DECwindows client for use with Wollongong or UCX
         job.acs.ohio-state.edu:XGOPHER_CLIENT.SHARE


     * Note: these Macintosh clients require MacTCP.

     Most of the above clients can also be fetched via a gopher client
     itself.  Put the following on a gopher server:

       Type=1
       Host=boombox.micro.umn.edu
       Port=70
       Path=
       Name=Gopher Software Distribution.

 
     Or point your gopher client at boombox.micro.umn.edu, port 70 and
     look in the gopher directory.


     There are also a number of public telnet login sites available.
     The University of Minnesota operates one on the machine
     "consultant.micro.umn.edu" (134.84.132.4) See Q3 for more
     information about this.  It is recommended that you run the client
     software instead of logging into the public telnet login sites.  A
     client uses the custom features of the local machine (mouse,
     scroll bars, etc.)  A local client is also faster.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Q3:  Where are there publicly available logins (ie places to telnet to
     in order to get a taste of gopher) for Gopher?

A3:  Here is a short list, use the site closest to you to minimize
     network lag.

     Telnet Public Logins:

     Hostname                  IP#              Login   Area
     ------------------------- ---------------  ------  -------------
     consultant.micro.umn.edu  134.84.132.4	gopher  North America
     gopher.uiuc.edu           128.174.33.160   gopher  North America
     panda.uiowa.edu           128.255.40.201	panda   North America
     gopher.sunet.se           192.36.125.2     gopher  Europe
     info.anu.edu.au           150.203.84.20    info    Australia
     gopher.chalmers.se        129.16.221.40    gopher  Sweden
     tolten.puc.cl             146.155.1.16     gopher  South America
     ecnet.ec		           157.100.45.2     gopher  Ecuador
     gan.ncc.go.jp             160.190.10.1     gopher  Japan


     It is recommended that you run the client software instead of
     logging into the public login sites.  A client uses the
     custom features of the local machine (mouse, scroll bars, etc.)
     and gives faster response.  Furthermore many of the basic features
     of clients - saving a file to your hard drive, printing a file
     to a local printer, viewing images, retrieving files from ftp
     sites etc.... are not available by the telnet logins.



---------------------------------------------------------------------
Q4:  Who Develops Gopher Software?

A4:  Gopher was originally developed in April 1991 by the University
     of Minnesota Microcomputer, Workstation, Networks Center to help
     our campus find answers to their computer questions.  

     It has since grown into a full-fledged World Wide Information
     System used by a large number of sites in the world.

     Many people have contributed to the project, too numerous to
     count. 

     The people behind the much of the gopher software can be reached
     via e-mail at gopher@boombox.micro.umn.edu, or via paper mail:
   
      Internet Gopher Developers
      100 Union St. SE #190
      Minneapolis, MN 55455  USA

     Or via FAX at:
 
      +1 (612) 625-6817

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Q5: What is the relationship between Gopher and (WAIS, WWW, ftp)?

A5: Gopher is intimately intertwined with these two other systems.
     As shipped the Unix gopher server has the capability to: 
     
       - Search local WAIS indices.
       - Query remote WAIS servers and funnel the results to gopher
         clients.
       - Query remote ftp sites and funnel the results to gopher
         clients.
       - Be queried by WWW (World Wide Web) clients (either using
         built in gopher querying or using native http querying.

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Q6: Are papers or articles describing Gopher available?

A6: Gopher has a whole chapter devoted to it in :

     _The_Whole_Internet_, Ed Kroll, O'Reilly, 1992 (Editors note:
                             ..Great book, go out and buy a bunch!)

     _The_Internet_Passport: NorthWestNet's Guide to Our World Online"
     By Jonathan Kochmer and NorthWestNet. Published by NorthWestNet,
     Bellevue, WA. 1993. 516 pp. ISBN 0-9635281-0-6. 
     Contact info: passport@nwnet.net, or (206) 562-3000

     _A_Students_Guide_to_UNIX by Harley Hahn. (publisher McGraw Hill,
     Inc.; 1993 ISBN 0-07-025511-3)


     Other references include:

     _The_Internet_Gopher_, "ConneXions", July 1992, Interop.

     _Exploring_Internet_GopherSpace_ "The Internet Society News", v1n2 1992, 

     (You can subscribe to the Internet Society News by sending e-mail to
      isoc@nri.reston.va.us)

     _The_Internet_Gopher_Protocol_, Proceedings of the Twenty-Third
          IETF, CNRI, Section 5.3

     _Internet_Gopher_, Proceedings of Canadian Networking '92

     _The_Internet_Gopher_, INTERNET: Getting Started, SRI
          International, Section 10.5.5

     _Tools_help_Internet_users_discover_on-line_treasures, Computerworld,
          July 20, 1992

     _TCP/IP_Network_Administration_, O'Reilly.

      Balakrishan, B. (Oct 1992)
        "SPIGopher: Making SPIRES databases accessible through the
      Gopher protocol".  SPIRES Fall '92 Workshop, Chapel Hill, North
      Carolina.

      Tomer, C.  Information Technology Standards for Libraries,
      _Journal of the American Society for Information Science_,
      43(8):566-570, Sept 1992.


-------------------------------------------------------------------
Q7: What is veronica?

A7: veronica:  Very Easy Rodent-Oriented Net-wide Index to 
     Computerized Archives.

     veronica offers a keyword search of most gopher-server menu titles
     in the entire gopher web.  As archie is to ftp archives, veronica 
     is to gopherspace.  A veronica search produces a menu of gopher
     items, each of which is a direct pointer to a gopher data source.
     Because veronica is accessed through a gopher client, it is easy
     to use, and gives access to all types of data supported by the
     gopher protocol.

     To try veronica, select it from the "Other Gophers" menu on 
     Minnesota's gopher server, or point your gopher at:

     Name=veronica (search menu items in most of GopherSpace) 
     Type=1 
     Port=70 
     Path=1/veronica 
     Host=futique.scs.unr.edu

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Q8: What is Available for Biology?

A8: There is an incredible amount of software, data and information
    availble to biologists now by gopher.

Here is a brief list of the Biological Databases that you can search 
via gopher:

      2.  BDT Tropical Data Base Searches/
      3.  Biotechnet Buyers Guide - Online Catalogues for Biology 
      4.  Search Protein Data Bank Headers 
      5.  Chlamydomonas Genetics Center /
      6.  Crystallization database/
      7.  HGMP Databases - Probes and Primers /
      8.  Museum of Paleontology TYPE Specimen Index 
      9.  MycDB - Mycobacterium DataBase 
      10. Search (Drosophila) Flybase (Indiana)/
      11. Search (GenBank + SWISS-PROT + PIR + PDB)  
      12. Search AAtDB -  An Arabidopsis thaliana Database 
      13. Search ACEDB - A Caenorhabditis elegans Database 
      14. Search CompoundKB - A Metabolic Compound Database 
      15. Search Databases at Welchlab (Vectors, Promoters, NRL-3D, EST, OMI../
      16. Search EMBL 
      17. Search GenBank 
      18. Search Genbank - 2 
      19. Search Genbank Updates 
      20. Search LiMB 
      21. Search PIR  
      22. Search PIR (keyword,species...) 
      23. Search PROSITE 
      24. Search Rebase - Restriction Enzyme Database 
      25. Search SWISS-PROT 
      26. Search TFD 
      27. Search the C. elegans Strain List  
      28. Search the DNA Database of Japan 
      29. Search the EC Enzyme Database  
      30. Search the GrainGenes database  
      31. Search the Maize Database /
      32.  Cloning Vectors: plasmids, phage, etc. 
      33.  EPD - Eukaryotic Promoter Database 
      34.  EST - Expressed Sequence Tag Database - Human 
      35.  wEST - Expressed Sequence Tag Database - C. elegans 
      36.  Kabat Database of Proteins of Immunological Interest 
      37.  NRL_3D Protein Sequence-Structure Database 
      38.  OMIM - Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 
      39.  Seqanalref - Sequence Analysis Bibliographic Reference Data Ban.. 
      40. Search Rebase - Restriction Enzyme Database 
      41. Search the EC Enzyme Database 
      42. Search The Rodent Section of Genbank 
      43. Database Taxonomy (Genbank, Swiss-Prot ...)/
      44. Retrieve Full PDB Entries by Accession Number 
      45. Search for All Researchers funded by NIH 
      46. Search for Genome Researchers funded by DOE 
      47. Search for Researchers funded by NSF 
      48. Search for Researchers funded by the USDA 
      49. E-mail Addresses of Crystallographers/
      50. E-mail Addresses of Yeast Reasearchers/
      51. Phonebooks Around the World/
      52.  Search and Retrieve Software for All Computers/
      53.  Search and Retrieve Macintosh Software/
      54.  Search and Retrieve DOS Software/
      55.  Search and Retrieve GNU Software/
      56.  Search and Retrieve Software for Biology/
      57.  Search for Agricultural Software/
      58.  Search and Retrieve Graphics Software and Data/
      59.  Search and Retrieve all Online Perl Scripts/
      60.  FTP Sites For Biology (56 archives for software and data)/


And the list goes on - this is just the beginning

File 35/1144: Re: Looking for X windows on a PC (long list of known servers) (77.6%)


>markw@pspmf3.gpsemi.com (Mark Wilkinson - Ext 3443) writes:
>
>>Hi All,
>>       This is the first time I've posted to the net, so I hope this is
>>going to the right people.
>>  I'm looking for software packages that run on an IBM PC clone that
>>allows me to display Openlook and motif windows on the PC. 
>>  The idea is to use the PC as a cheap X windows terminal for use by
>>process Engineers at work. 

   Here's a listing that I came accross a while ago.  This question seems to 
come up often enough that I figured this would be of interest.  Note that 
the server "X Appeal" for DOS is available in demo form on the internet via 
anonymous ftp.  This is one way of quickly checking out the feasability of 
using your system as an X server.  Enjoy!

- Pete

------------------------------- Begin Enclosure ----------------------------


================================================================================
     X Servers for DOS, Microsoft Windows, OS/2, Macs, Amigas, Atari
================================================================================
                      April 1, 1993 - Volume 12.0
================================================================================
                I-NET Inc.
                Software Technology Branch
                Information Systems Directorate
                NASA/Johnson Space Center

POST MAIL:      NASA Mail Code PT4
                NASA/Johnson Space Center
                Houston, Texas 77058

================================================================================
This is a monthly guide of X servers that can be used on non-UNIX
networked machines to display X clients running on UNIX machines.  I
use the name UNIX loosely here.  I know others can run X.

The sources for this information come from many places:  the FAQ for
comp.windows.x, blurbs and info packets from the vendors, user manuals
for the products themselves, conversations with sales representatives,
personal experience, comp.windows.x articles, etc.

Please forward any corrections or updates to the above address.

This file is also available by anonymous ftp at:
        export.lcs.mit.edu[18.24.0.12] in /contrib/XServers-NonUNIX.txt.Z
        ftp.uwp.edu[131.210.1.4] in /pub/misc/XServers-NonUNIX.txt
        msdos.archive.umich.edu[141.211.164.153] in
                msdos/info/XServers-NonUNIX.txt and msdos/info/xnonunix.zip


X Servers for DOS:
        DESQview/X
        IBM X/Windows
        Micro X-DOS
        Micro X-lite
        PC DECWindows Motif V3.0
        PC X-Windows
        PC Xsight
        PC-XView
        SAGE 1280 Adapter and X Windows Display Server
        TeemTalk-X
        Vista-eXceed
        X Appeal
        Xinet X-Station
        Xnth
        XoftWare for DOS
        XoftWare for TIGA/DOS

X Servers Microsoft Windows:
        DESQview/X
        eXcursion for Windows
        eXodus for MS Windows
        HCL-eXceed/W
        MicroX
        MultiView/X
        PC-XView
        Vista-eXceed
        X-One
        X11/AT
        XoftWare
        XVision

X Servers OS/2:
        IBM X-Windows for OS/2

X Servers Macintosh:
        eXodus
        MacX

X Servers Amiga:
        UNKNOWN
        X Window System Version 11 Release for the Amiga Computer

X Servers Atari:
        X/TOS/window/server and X/TOS/window/server/color
==X-Servers==X-Servers==X-Servers==X-Servers==X-Servers==X-Servers==X-Servers===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
DESQview/X
==========
        Melinda
        Quarterdeck Office Systems, Inc.
        150 Pico Boulevard
        Santa Monica, CA 90405
        TEL: (310)392-9851
        FAX: (310)399-3802
        $275
Latest Version:
        1.0
        386SX or higher (286 version available)
        4 Mbytes
Operating System:
        DOS 3.0 or higher
        DR DOS 6 or higher
        optional - MS compatible pointing device
        EGA, VGA, Super VGA, 8514/A, or 256 color DGIS
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:

Disk Space:
        40 Mbyte hard drive
        incorporates X into the DESQview multi-tasking DOS environment
        adds a graphical 3D look and feel to DESQview
        gives users a choice of window managers (look and feels)
        provides a growth path from character mode DOS to industry standard
                graphical user interfaces
        runs most regular DOS applications
        runs DOS Extended applications up to 4Gbytes
        can display DOS applications within graphical windows
        multitasks DOS applications and X Clients either locally or remotely
        provides a simple port of applications from other X systems to
                DESQview/X and vice versa
        gives developers a choice of application appearances, based on toolkit
                chosen
        supports toolkits that provide features required by developers such as
                push buttons, scrollbars, pop up dialogue boxes, etc.
        Adobe Type Manager for scalable fonts and scalable DOS windows
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
IBM X/Windows
=============
        IBM
        part #5765-025

Latest Version:
        2.1


Operating System:
        DOS


Ethernet Card:

Network Software:

Disk Space:


===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
Micro X-DOS
===========
        StarNet Communications Corporation
        3073 Lawrence Expressway
        Santa Clara, CA 95051
        TEL: (408)739-0881
        FAX: (408)739-0936
        micro-x@starnet.com
        $345.00 1 unit
        $225.00 ea. 5 pack (greater discount for larger quantities)
        upgrades at 25% of original price
        educational discount of 10%
Latest Version:
        1.6.1
        386, 486
        2 Mbytes
Operating System:
        DOS 3.1 or higher
        2 or 3 button mouse with MS compatible driver
        Ahead(V5000)
        ATI(18800)
        Everex(VP VGA)
        Genoa(6400)
        Paradise(900C00/11/30)
        STB(EM-16)
        Trident(8800CS)
        Tseng Labs(ET-3000-4000)
        Video7(HT208 V7VGA)
        Western Digital(900C00/11/30)
        ZyMOS(Poach51)
        VESA
        and others
Ethernet Card:
        3Com/3C501/503/505/523
        3Com EtherLink/MC
        Cabletron 1-2-3000
        Micom-Interlan NI5010-5210
        Western Digital WD80003E
        Novell NE-1000/2000
        National Semiconductor
        boards that have their own packet driver from manufacturer
Network Software Included:
        StarNet TCP/IP (integrated)
        NCSA Telnet, ftp, lpr, etc.
        Packet Drivers (Clarkson/Crynwr)
Network Software Supported:
        Beame & Whiteside - BW-TCP
        FTP Software - PC/TCP
        Sun - PC-NFS
Disk Space:
        3 Mbytes (9 Mbytes for all fonts)
        5-1/4 1.2 Mbyte or 3-1/2 1.44 Mbyte needed
        X11R4
        Intelligent installation program
        TCP/IP built-in
        Support Motif, OPEN LOOK, and DEC
        Supports Clarkson (Crynwr) packet drivers
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
Micro X-lite
============
        StarNet Communications Corporation
        3073 Lawrence Expressway
        Santa Clara, CA 95051
        TEL: (408)739-0881
        FAX: (408)739-0936
        micro-x@starnet.com
        $75.00
Latest Version:
        1.5.3
        286, 386, 486
        640 Kbytes
Operating System:
        DOS 3.1 or higher
        2 or 3 button mouse with MS compatible driver
        Ahead(V5000)
        ATI(18800)
        Everex(VP VGA)
        Genoa(6400)
        Paradise(900C00/11/30)
        STB(EM-16)
        Trident(8800CS)
        Tseng Labs(ET-3000-4000)
        Video7(HT208 V7VGA)
        Western Digital(900C00/11/30)
        ZyMOS(Poach51)
        VESA 
        and others
Ethernet Card:
        3Com/3C501/503/505/523
        3Com EtherLink/MC
        Cabletron 1-2-3000
        Micom-Interlan NI5010-5210
        Western Digital WD80003E
        Novell NE-1000/2000
        National Semiconductor
        boards that have their own packet driver from manufacturer
Network Software Included:
        StarNet TCP/IP (integrated)
        NCSA Telnet, ftp, lpr, ...
        Packet Drivers (Clarkson/Crynwr)
Network Software Supported:
        Beame & Whiteside - BW-TCP
        FTP Software - PC/TCP
        Sun - PC-NFS
Disk Space:
        2 Mbytes
        5-1/4 1.2 Mbyte or 3-1/2 1.44 Mbyte needed
        X11R4
        Intelligent installation program
        TCP/IP built-in
        8 clients on screen at time
	Fixed font oriented (variable fonts available)
        Support Motif, OPEN LOOK, and DEC
        Supports Clarkson (Crynwr) packet drivers
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
PC DECWindows Motif V3.0
========================
        Dennis Giokas
        PC DECWindows Development
        Digital Equipment Corporation
        30 Porter Rd.
        Littleton, MA 01460

Latest Version:
        V3.0
        286, 386
        up to 15 Mbytes
Operating System:
        MS-DOS
        any pointing device with MS Mouse V6.0 or later interface
        EGA (16 color and mono)
        MCGA
        VGA (16 color and mono)
        enhanced VGA (800x600 16 color and mono)
        8514/A (1024x768 16/256 color)
        pseudo color visual
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        TCP/IP and DECnet
Disk Space:

        X11 Release 4 server
        integrated virtual memory manager
        standard IBM-compatible keyboards and Digital's LK250
        Session manager client integrated into the server
        suspend session feature to run DOS commands
        Font Compiler for Adobe Bitmap Distribution files
        KEYSYM compiler to customize the keyboard for default KEYCODE to KEYSYM
                mappings; over 70 pre-defined keyboard mapping files
        Configuration utility to define hardware environment and user
                preferences
        supports DECnet and TCP/IP.  Available from DEC.
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
PC-XView
========
        Network Computing Devices Inc.
        PC-Xdivision
        9590 SW Gemini Drive
        Beaverton, OR  97005
        TEL: (800)800-9599, (503)641-2200
        FAX: (503)643-8642

        There are also 15 NCD technical and sales offices around the United
                States and other international offices
        PC-Xview for DOS      $445.00 for 1  $1780.00 for 5
        Annual Maintenance    $150.00 for 1   $450.00 for 5
        Update                $125.00 for 1   $375.00 for 5
Latest Version:
        PC-Xview for DOS     Version 4.0
        286, 386 (386 recommended)
        1 Mbyte (2 Mbytes recommended)
Operating System:
        DOS 3.2 or higher

        CGA, EGA, VGA, SVGA, XGA, TIGA
        8514/A Video Standard supported with extended memory
        Japanese Graphics Mode
        high resolution graphics boards:  Compac, Dell, HP, NEC,
                Spectragraphics Squeegee, and over 50 other DGIS-based
Ethernet Card:
        over 35 Ethernet communications boards supported
Network Software Needed:
        TCP/IP
        DECnet
Disk Space:
        5 Mbytes (7 Mbytes recommended)
        UNIX application support for traditional applications and
                window managers such as Motif and OPEN LOOK
        off-loads the graphics processing of UNIX hosts
        hot-key to DOS
        access to local peripherals and DOS utilities
        easy and well-documented installation procedures
        pop-up control panel
        Motif compliant Local Window Manager
        ability to run in Windows PIF window
        hot-key between X and DOS (no longer have to exit) a TSR
        DPMI compatibility
        enhanced protocol tracing
        Support XRemote protocol
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
PC X-Windows
============
        Intelligent Decisions Inc.
        536 Weddell Dr. Suite 2C
        Sunnyvale, CA 94089
        TEL: (408)734-3730
        FAX: (408)734-3634
        $295
Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        1 Mbyte (more recommended for hi-res or lots of pixmaps)
Operating System:
        DOS 3.1 of higher
        MS compatible mouse
        VGA, some SVGA
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        FTP Software's PC/TCP
        Wollongong's WIN/TCP
Disk Space:
        4 Mbytes on hard disk
        Port of MIT X11R4 server
        Shape extension
        MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE
        XDMCP
        font compiler
        fonts supplied
        Motif, Open Look, DECWindows (VMS and Ultrix) demonstrated to work with
                this server at InterOp last year.
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
PC Xsight
=========
        PC XSight
        Locus Computing Corporation
        9800 La Cienega Blvd.
        Inglewood, CA 90301
        TEL: (800)955-6287
        CA: (213)670-6500
        UK: +44 296 89911

Latest Version:

        8088, 8086, 286, 386
        640 Kbytes base memory with 512 Kbytes available
        896 Kbytes extended memory
Operating System:
        MS/PC DOS 3.1 or later
        2 or 3 button mouse and driver (3 button mouse recommend)
        EGA, VGA, Hercules, or AT&T 6300
Ethernet Card:
        Excelan EXOS 205 or 205T
        3COM 3C501
        Western Digital WD8003E
        Micom NI5210
        Acer Multitech 5220
Network Software:

Disk Space:
        5-1/4-inch high-density or 3-1/2-inch diskette drive
        1 Mbyte

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
SAGE 1280 Adapter and X Windows Display Server
==============================================
        Sigma Designs, Inc.
        46501 Landing Parkway
        Fremont, CA 94538
        TEL: (415)770-0100
        FAX: (415)770-0110
        TELEX: 17124

Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486

Operating System:
        DOS 3.0 or higher or UNIX System V/386

        high end multiscanning or fixed frequency 64 kHz monitors
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:

Disk Space:

        menu-driven installation and configuration program
        1280x1024 resolution
        TIGA-340, 8514/A AI Emulation
        CGA, MDA, Hercules, VGA pass-through emulation modes
        256 colors displayable simultaneously from a palette of 16.7 million
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
TeemTalk-X
==========
        Pericom
        TEL: +44 (0908) 560022

Latest Version:



Operating System:



Ethernet Card:

Network Software:

Disk Space:

        for IBM clones allows toggling between X and DOS
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
Vista-eXceed
============
        Control Data Corporation
        Vista Distributing Computing
        9315 Largo Drive West
        Suite 250
        Landover, MD 20785
        TEL: (301)808-4270
        Vista-eXceed
        Vista-eXceed Plus
        Vista-eXceed Plus/8514A
Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        640 Kbytes to 1 Mbyte for DOS server
        1.64 Mbytes for Vista-eXceed Plus and Vista-eXceed Plus/8514A
Operating System:
        MS-DOS or PC-DOS 3.0 or higher
        2 or 3 button MS compatible mouse
        EGA, VGA, or SVGA
        color or analog monochrome monitor
Ethernet Card:
        any supported by TCP/IP transports listed below
Network Software:
        PC/TCP Network Software for DOS by FTP Software Inc.
        PC-NFS by Sun Microsystems, Inc.
        WIN/TCP for DOS by The Wallongong Group, Inc.
        Pathway Access for DOS by The Wallongong Group, Inc.
        LAN WorkPlace TCP/IP Transport System by Novell/Excelan
        3+Open TCP by 3COM Corporation
        HP ARPA Services by Hewlett Packard Corporation
        Net-One TCP BNS/PC by Ungermann-Bass, Inc.
        BWNFS or Telnet Package by Beame & Whiteside Software Ltd.
Disk Space:
        hard disk
        can may up to 16 Mbytes available for client processing
        emulates a 3-button mouse with a 2-button mouse
        full interactive support for X font names and alias' schemes
        locally modify keyboard mapping
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
X Appeal
========
        Giovanni Novelli
        Xtreme s.a.s. - Livorno, Italy
        FAX: +39-586-502310
        xappeal@xtreme.sublink.org (before 1-1-93)
        xappeal@xtreme.it          (after  1-1-93)
        $350    with quantity discounts:
                23% off for 20 copies
                39% off for 50 copies
                51% off for 100 copies
        additional 30% discount for educational institutions
        demo copies available through anonymous ftp at garbo.uwasa.fi:
                pc/demo/xap13exe.zip    (README and executables)
                pc/demo/xap10fon.zip    (local server fonts)
                pc/connect/drivers.zip  (packet drivers)
Latest Version:
        1.3
        386SX or higher
        2 Mbytes (4 Mbytes recommended)
Operating System:
        MS-DOS 3.30 or later
        any pointing device with MS Mouse compatible driver
        most SVGA boards in 256 color mode
        Ahead (V5000B)
        ATI (18800)
        Chips & Technologies (82C452)
        Genoa (6400)
        NCR (77C22E)
        Oak Technologies (OTI-067)
        Paradise (WD90C00)
        Trident (8900, 8900C)
        Tseng Labs (ET3000, ET4000)
        Western Digital (WD90C00)
Ethernet Card:
        any model compatible with packet drivers
Network Software:
        TCP/IP included
Disk Space:
        at least 2 Mbytes
        full X11R5 Server implementation, including PEX and font server support
        screen painting exceeds 6000 Xstones in 1024x768 resolution (256 colors)
                on a 386/33 without 387
        support for all color classes (StaticGray, GrayScale, StaticColor,
                PseudoColor, TrueColor and DirectColor)
        run-time resolution switch and panning on a virtual screen
        emulates a 3-button mouse with a 2-button mouse
        fast cursor tracking
        full support for European keyboard layouts
        no memory limitation through use of virtual memory
        32 bit protected mode DOS-extended application
        built-in TCP/IP support, using the packet driver for the Ethernet
                board (free packet driver collection included)
        interactive configuration utility
        X Display Manager Control Protocol support (for hosts running xdm)
        X-Authorization (MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1)
        shape Extension for non-rectangular windows
        font compiler and RGB database utilities
        X11 fonts provided, including fonts for Sun Open Windows and DECWindows
        UNIX application support for traditional applications and
                window managers such as Motif and OPEN LOOK
        built-in rcp/rsh server, to allow file transfers and the execution
                of useful DOS functions without leaving the X environment
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
Xinet X-Station
===============
        Xinetron
        CA
        TEL: (408)727-5509

Latest Version:

        286, 386

Operating System:



Ethernet Card:

Network Software:

Disk Space:

        up to 8 clients
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
Xnth
====
        Jerry Norman
        Nth Graphics, Ltd.
        TEL: (800)624-7552
        this X server project has been abandoned

        286, 386

Operating System:
        DOS 3.3 or higher


Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        TCP/IP
Disk Space:

        supports 1280X1024 or 1024X768 resolution monitors at 256 colors (out
        of 16M) with hardware acceleration for graphics and text
        operations
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
XoftWare for DOS
================
        AGE Logic, Inc.
        9985 Pacific Heights Blvd.
        San Diego, CA 92121
        TEL: (619)455-8600, (619)565-7373
        FAX: (619)597-6030
        email: sales@age.com

        Bert Shure
        TEL: (619)455-8600(ext.104)
        email: bert@age.com, age!bert@ucsd.edu
        $395.00
        with TCP/IP $495.00
Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        2 Mbytes extended
Operating System:
        DOS 3.1 or higher
        2 or 3 button mouse with MS compatible driver
        EGA, VGA, SVGA or 8514
Ethernet Card:
        compatible with network software
Network Software:
        3Com 3+ Open TCP(1.2 of higher)
        DEC Pathworks TCP/IP (1.1 of higher)
        ftp PC/TCP (2.05 of higher)
        Novell LAN WorkPlace (4.01 of higher)
        Sun PC/NFS (3.5 or higher)
        Wollongong Pathway Access (2.05 or higher)
Disk Space:
        2 Mbytes
        5-1/4 1.2 Mbyte or 3-1/2 1.44 Mbyte floppy needed
        MIT compliant with AGE extensions
        Hotkeys to DOS and MS Windows
        Passive, telnet, rsh, rexec, or XDMCP startup modes
        Motif, OpenLook, and DECWindows support
        Virtual screen Support
        International keyboard support
        Full font library in SNF format
        BDF to SNF font compiler
        Complete documentation
        Support and update service
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===
XoftWare for TIGA/DOS
=====================
        AGE Logic, Inc.
        9985 Pacific Heights Blvd.
        San Diego, CA 92121
        TEL: (619)455-8600, (619)565-7373
        FAX: (619)597-6030
        email: sales@age.com

        Bert Shure
        TEL: (619)455-8600(ext.104)
        email: bert@age.com, age!bert@ucsd.edu
        $495.00
        with TCP/IP $595.00
Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        512 Kbytes
Operating System:
        DOS 3.0 or higher
        2 or 3 button mouse with MS compatible driver
        Texas Instruments TMS340-based graphics accelerator with TIGA 2.0 or
                higher whith 1Mbyte DRAM
Ethernet Card:
        compatible with network software
Network Software:
        3Com 3+ Open TCP(1.2 of higher)
        DEC Pathworks TCP/IP (1.1 of higher)
        ftp PC/TCP (2.05 of higher)
        Novell LAN WorkPlace (4.01 of higher)
        Sun PC/NFS (3.5 or higher)
        Wollongong Pathway Access (2.05 or higher)
Disk Space:
        2 Mbytes
        5-1/4 1.2 Mbyte or 3-1/2 1.44 Mbyte floppy needed
        MIT compliant with AGE extensions
        Hotkeys to DOS and MS Windows
        Passive, telnet, rsh, rexec, or XDMCP startup modes
        Motif, OpenLook, and DECWindows support
        Virtual screen Support
        International keyboard support
        Full font library in SNF format
        BDF to SNF font compiler
        Complete documentation
        Support and update service
        Optimized for TIGA graphics accelerators
===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS==DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===DOS===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
DESQview/X
==========
        Melinda
        Quarterdeck Office Systems, Inc.
        150 Pico Boulevard
        Santa Monica, CA 90405
        TEL: (310)392-9851
        FAX: (310)399-3802
        $275
Latest Version:
        1.0
        386SX or higher (286 version available)
        4 Mbytes recommended
Operating System:
        PC or MS DOS 3.0 or higher
        DR DOS 6 or higher
        MS compatible pointing device
        EGA
        VGA
        Super VGA
        8514/A
        256-color DGIS
        ATI 18800/28800(800x600)
        C&T 82c452(720x540)
        C&T 82c453(1024x768)
        Tseng ET3000(800x600)
        Tseng ET4000(1024x768)
        Genoa 6400(800x600)
        WD PVGA1a(640x480)
        WD90C00(640x480)
        WD90C11(800x600)
        some revisions of Headland VEGA(800x800) and Headland V7VGA(1024x768)
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:

Disk Space:
        40 Mbyte hard drive
        incorporates X into the DESQview multi-tasking DOS environment
        adds a graphical 3D look and feel to DESQview
        gives users a choice of window managers (look and feels)
        provides a growth path from character mode DOS to industry standard
                graphical user interfaces
        runs most regular DOS applications
        runs DOS Extended applications up to 4Gbytes
        can display DOS applications within graphical windows
        multitasks DOS applications and X Clients either locally or remotely
        provides a simple port of applications from other X systems to
                DESQview/X and vice versa
        gives developers a choice of application appearances, based on toolkit
                chosen
        supports toolkits that provide features required by developers such as
                push buttons, scrollbars, pop up dialogue boxes, etc.
        can run DOS text and MS Windows graphics programs locally and remotely
        Adobe Type Manager for scalable fonts and scalable DOS windows
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
eXcursion for Windows
=====================
        Digital Equipment Corporation
        Maynard, Massachusetts

Latest Version:
        1.0
        286, 386, 486
        2 Mbytes
Operating System:
        DOS
        MS Windows 3.0 or later
        MS Windows supported mouse
        MS Windows supported card
Ethernet Card:
        
Network Software:
        Decnet with PATHWORKS for DOS
        TCP/IP with PATHWORKS for DOS (TCP/IP)
        TCP/IP with PC/TCP from FTP Software, Inc.
        TCP/IP with 3Com TCP with Demand Protocol Architecture
Disk Space:
        7-15 Mbytes hard desk
        3.5-720 Kbyte or 5.25-1.2 Mbyte floppy drive
        Seperate application windows for each X applicatioon displayed by the X
                server 
        EXcursion Setup utility for installing eXcursion under MS Windows
        Control Panes provides an easy way to start X applications and
                customize environment
        Online Help
        Ability to cut and paste text or graphics between X and MS Windows
        Ability to compile new fonts
        Ability to redefine keys on the keyboard
        Personal password security access to eXcursion
        Three button mouse emulation
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
eXodus for MS Windows
=====================
        White Pine Software, Inc.
        40 Simon Street, Suite 201
        Nashua, HN 03060-3043
        TEL: (603)886-9050
        FAX: (603)886-9051
        email: sdarling@wpine.com
        AppleLink: WHITEPINE
        $449
Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        2 Mbytes (4 Mbytes recommended)
Operating System:
        DOS
        MS Windows 3.0 or higher
        recommended
        EGA, VGA, SVGA, DGIS
Ethernet Card:
        most cards
Network Software:

Disk Space:

        X11R4
        color and monochrome X screen support including 24bit TrueColor
        backing store and save under options
        full XDMCP support
        access control support
        online help
        3 button mouse emulation
        text and graphics transfers between MS Windows and Macintosh clipboards
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
HCL-eXceed/W
============
        Hummingbird Communications Ltd.
        2900 John Street, Unit 4
        Markham, Ontario, Canada L3R 5G3
        TEL: (416)470-1203
        FAX: (416)470-1207
        $595    1 copy
        $536    2-4 copies
        $476    5-9 copies
        $417    10 or more copies
Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        2 Mbytes or more recommended
Operating System:
        DOS
        MS Windows version 3 (Standard and 386 Enhanced Modes)
        MS compatible pointing device
        EGA, VGA, or VGA+
Ethernet Card:
        any compatible with the networking product you choose
Network Software:

Disk Space:

        makes full use of 8514 and other high resolution graphics cards
        redesigned for MS Windows (not an implementation of MIT X)
        copy & paste between X-Windows and MS Windows
        interactive configuration utility
        full interactive support for font naming & alias schemes
        font compiler
        log file of host-generated messages
        Backing Store and Save Unders
        virtual screen support
        seven start-up methods
        full support for European keyboards
        font, host access & RGB databases loading
        X protocol trace & dissassembly functionality
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
Micro X-WIN
===========
        StarNet Communications
        3073 Lawrence Expressway
        Santa Clara, CA 95051
        TEL: (408)739-0881
        FAX: (408)739-0936
        micro-x@starnet.com
        Micro X-WIN $425.00 1 unit
                    $300.00 ea. 5-pack (greater discount for larger quantities)
        upgrades at 25% of original price
        educational discount of 10%
Latest Version:
        2.2.1 for X11 Release 5
        386, 486
        4 Mbytes
Operating System:
        MS-DOS 3.1 or higher
        MS Windows 3.1 or higher
        2 or 3 button with MS compatible driver
        MS Windows supported cards
Ethernet Card:
        3Com/3C501/503/505/523
        3Com EtherLink/MC
        Cabletron 1-2-3000
        Micom-Interlan NI5010-5210
        Western Digital WD80003E
        Novell NE-1000/2000
        National Semiconductor
        boards that have their own packet driver from manufacturer
Network Software Included:
        Lanera TCPOpen (WinSock compatible)
Network Software Supported:
        FTP Software - PC/TCP
        Lanera - TCPOpen
        Sun - PC-NFS
        WinSock compatible TCP/IP stacks
Disk Space:
        5 Mbytes
        5-1/4 1.2 Mbyte or 3-1/2 1.44 Mbyte needed
        X11R5
        Integrated rsh/rexec with displayed results
        Auto start-up with XDMCP or rsh/rexec
        Easy additional session start-up
        Panning
        Supports Motif, OPEN LOOK, and DECWindows
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
MultiView/X
===========
        JSB Computer Systems Ltd.
        Cheshire House, Castle Street, Macclesfield
        Cheshire, England, SK11 6AF
        TEL: 0625 433618

        JSB Corporation
        108 Whispering Pines Drive, Suite 115
        Scotts Valley, California 95066
        TEL: (408)438-8300, (800)359-3408
        FAX: (408)438-8360

Latest Version:



Operating System:
        DOS
        MS Windows


Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        RS 232 direct connections, RS 232 modem connections, Atlantix Axcess,
        Beame & Whiteside TCP/IP, D-Link TCP/IP for DOS, FTP PC/TCP,
        HP ARPA Services for DOS, IBM AIX Access for DOS users,
        ICL Oslan (int 5b), Locus PCI, Locus TCP/IP for DOS,
        MS LAN Manager for UNIX, MS LAN Manager for UNIX V2.1, NCR Token Ring,
        Novell LAN WorkPlace for DOS, SCO Xenix-Net, Sun PC-NFS,
        Ungermann-Bass Net/One, Ungermann-BassNet/One NETCI (int6b),
        Wollongong PathWay Access DOS, Wollongong WIN/TCP for DOS,
        3 Com 3+Open TCP
Disk Space:

        provides a Character Server for character applications
        emulation for DEC VT100, DEC VT220, DEC VT241, SCO UNIX/Xenix Console,
                X/Open ANSI, INTERACTIVE UNIX Console, AT&T UNIX Console
        automatically invokes the X server when an X client is selected
        passive, telnet, rsh, rexec, and XDMCP startup modes supported
        full X11R4 font library provided in standard Windows format
        BDF to Windows compiler
        copy and paste of text available
        single iconic desktop
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
PC-XView
========
        Network Computing Devices Inc.
        PC-Xdivision
        9590 SW Gemini Drive
        Beaverton, OR  97005
        TEL: (800)800-9599, (503)641-2200
        FAX: (503)643-8642

        There are also 15 NCD technical and sales offices around the United
                States and other international offices
        PC-Xview for Windows  $445.00 for 1  $1780.00 for 5
        Annual Maintenance    $150.00 for 1   $450.00 for 5
        Update                $125.00 for 1   $375.00 for 5
Latest Version:
        3.1
        286, 386 (386 recommended)
        2 Mbytes (4 Mbytes recommended)
Operating System:
        MS-DOS or PC-DOS 3.0 or higher
        MS Windows 3.0/3.1 or Windows NT
        recommended but not needed
        any compatible with MS Windows
Ethernet Card:

Network Software Needed:
        TCP/IP
        DECnet
Disk Space:
        7 Mbytes (10 Mbytes recommended)
        runs MS Windows applications alongside X clients
        cut and paste between X clients and MS Windows
                applications using the Windows clipboard
        full support of X11R4 features, including the Shape extension
        off-loads graphics processing from host computers
        runs in both standard and enhanced modes of MS Windows
        manages X clients with a standard remote window manager or
                with MS Windows
        full X11 fonts provided, including fonts for Sun Open Windows
                and DECWindows
        Windows-based compiler that converts Bitmap Description Format
                BDF fonts to MS Windows format(FON) fonts
        Windows-based file transfer program
        prints files from a remote host on your local printer
        built-in client starter
        Windows-based installation and configuration
        DDL support for network interfaces
        easy installation procedures
        X Display Manager Control Protocol(XDMCP) support
        support for multiple TCP/IP network packages
        comprehensive and well organized User's guide
        Graphics Cut & Paste
        Virtual Screen support
        support the XRemote protocol (developed by NCD)
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
Vista-eXceed
============
        Control Data Corporation
        Vista Distributing Computing
        9315 Largo Drive West
        Suite 250
        Landover, MD 20785
        TEL: (301)808-4270
        Vista-eXceed/W
Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        2 Mbytes for MS Windows server
Operating System:
        DOS 3.0 or higher
        MS Windows 3.0
        2 or 3 button MS compatible mouse
        MS Windows supported mouse
        EGA, VGA, or SVGA
        any supported by MS Windows
Ethernet Card:
        any supported by TCP/IP transports listed below
Network Software:
        PC/TCP Network Software for DOS by FTP Software Inc.
        PC-NFS by Sun Microsystems, Inc.
        WIN/TCP for DOS by The Wallongong Group, Inc.
        Pathway Access for DOS by The Wallongong Group, Inc.
        LAN WorkPlace TCP/IP Transport System by Novell/Excelan
        3+Open TCP by 3COM Corporation
        HP ARPA Services by Hewlett Packard Corporation
        Net-One TCP BNS/PC by Ungermann-Bass, Inc.
        BWNFS or Telnet Package by Beame & Whiteside Software Ltd.
Disk Space:
        hard disk
        can may up to 16 Mbytes available for client processing
        emulates a 3-button mouse with a 2-button mouse
        full interactive support for X font names and alias' schemes
        locally modify keyboard mapping
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
X11/AT
======
        Intergrated Inference Machines, Inc.
        Computer Products Division
        1468 East Katella Avenue
        Anaheim, CA 92805-9806
        TEL: (714)978-6201 and (714)978-6776
        FAX: (714)939-0746

Latest Version:

        286, 386, 486
        640 Kbytes base memory
        2 Mbytes extended memory
Operating System:
        MS-DOS 3.1 or later
        MS Windows 3.0 or later

        any graphics card and that supports MS Windows - EGA or VGA resolution,
                or better, are recommended
        CGA (Color Graphics Adapter)
        COMPAQ Portable III or Portable 386 plasma display
        EGA with high-resolution color display
        EGA whith low-resolution color display
        Hercules with high-resolution monochrome display
        IBM 8514/A display
        Olivetti monochrome or PVC display
        Olivetti OEC display
        WYSE high resolution monochrome
        Moniterm Viking monochrome
        VGA (Video Graphics Array)
Ethernet Card:
        also compatible with Excelan, 3COM, Ungermann Bass, Western Digital,
        Tiara, IIM's X/PAC, and others
Network Software:
           Either Excelan's TCP/IP Driver Set or FTP Inc. PC/TCP Driver Set
                   (not included with X11/AT)
Disk Space:
        at least 2.5 Mbytes of storage capacity available for X11/AT software,
        excluding optional X fonts; to use all X fonts supplied with X11/AT,
        a total of 5.5 Mbytes is required
        Concurrent MS-DOS & X Windows operation
        Concurrent X Windows & Telnet operation
        Cut & Paste utility, FTP utility
        Font compiler for user-developed fonts
        Telnet and FTP utilities included
        compatible with the following FTP software programs, when not operated
                under MS Windows:
                ftp, the file transfer protocol client
                ftpsev, the file transfer protocol server
                interdrive, the network file system (NFS)
                ping, a network test
                tnvt, the telnet virtual terminal client
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
X-One
=====
        Grafpoint
        1485 Saratoga Avenue
        San Jose, CA 95129
        TEL: (800)426-2230 7:30-5:00 PST, (408)466-1919
        FAX: (408)446-0666
        uunet!grafpnt!sales
        (free demo copies)
Latest Version:

        386, 486
        2 Mbytes
Operating System:
        DOS 3.1 or higher
        MS Windows
        2 or 3 button mouse
        VGA
        Super VGA
        8514A
        TIGA
        VGA boards with S3 chip set
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        Grafpoint's TCP/IP included
Disk Space:

        X11R4
        on-screen setup
        builtin TCP/IP
        supports local clients such as telnet/vt100 window, a setup window,
                an rsh window, a local window manager
        DOS and Windows versions in one product
        hot key to DOS
        90 days of telephone technical support
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
XVision
=======
        VisionWare Limited            White Pine is re-badging XVision as
        57 Cardigan Lane                      eXodus for Windows
        Leeds LS4 2LE                         40 Simon Street, Suite 201
        United Kingdom                        Nashua, HN 03060-3043
        TEL: (0532) 788858                    TEL: (603)886-9050
                +44 532 788858                FAX: (603)886-9051
        FAX: (0532) 304676                    sdarling@wpine.com
                +44 532 304676                AppleLink: WHITEPINE
        vware@visionware.co.uk        
          $449.00  1 users         $9100.00 30 users
         $1800.00  5 users        $11850.00 40 users
         $3600.00 10 users        $14600.00 50 users
         $6350.00 20 users        educational discounts available
        adding a user where at least 10 are installed - $275.00
        XRemote support per PC:  bundled - $95.00        upgrade - $150.00
        full documentation - $60.00        evaluation copy - $60.00
Latest Version:
        4.1
        286, 386, 486
        2 Mbytes (4 Mbytes recommended)
Operating System:
        DOS 3.0 or later
        MS Windows 3.0 or later
        recommended but not required
        MS Windows compatible graphics
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        FTP PC/TCP
        Excelan LAN Workplace for DOS
        Locus TCP/IP for DOS
        Ungermann Bass NET/ONE TCP-PC
        Wollongong WIN/TCP for DOS
        Beame & Whiteside TCP/IP
        Sun PC-NFS
        HP LAN Manager (ARPA Services for DOS)
        3Com 3+ Open
Disk Space:
        5-1/4-inch high-density or 3-1/2-inch high-density
        copy and paste between X and MS Windows
        use a host window manager or allow MS Windows to control X clients
        support for all color classes (StaticGray, GrayScale, StaticColor,
                PseudoColor, TrueColor and DirectColor)
        several user options for performance enhancement
        X11 Release 5 server
        fonts and server extensions including XDMCP
        ICCCM compliant
        X clients may also use MS Windows fonts
        easy configuration of the system via dialog boxes
        provides the functionality of a three-button mouse
        support for all international keyboards supported by Windows
        host access control
        network-aware setup and on-line help
        iconic control panel for configuring XVision
        Dynamic Server Optimizations (XVision runs tests on the PC at install
                time to see how best to draw to the display)
        support for:  NCD XRemote, DECnet, SHAPE extension, 24-bit color,
                MS Windows font managers, all color classes, rsh, rexec
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===
XoftWare
========
        AGE Logic, Inc.
        9985 Pacific Heights Blvd.
        San Diego, CA 92121
        TEL: (619)455-8600, (619)565-7373
        FAX: (619)597-6030
        email: sales@age.com

        Bert Shure
        TEL: (619)455-8600(ext.104)
        email: bert@age.com, age!bert@ucsd.edu
        $495.00
        with TCP/IP  $595.00
Latest Version:

        386, 486
        2 Mbytes extended
Operating System:
        DOS 3.1 or higher
        Windows 3.0 or higher
        MS Windows compatible mouse
        card with MS Windows driver
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        Beame & Whiteside TCP/IP (2.2 or higher)
        ftp PC/TCP (2.05 of higher)
        DEC Pathworks (4.0 or higher)
        HP ARPA Services (2.1 or higher)
        Novell LAN WorkPlace (4.01 or higher)
        Sun PC/NFS (3.5 or higher)
        Ungermann-Bass Net/One TCP (16.5 or higher)
        Wollongong Pathway Access (4.1.1 or higher)
        Wollongong WIN/TCP (1.1 or higher)
        3Com 3+ Open TCP (1.2 or higher)
Disk Space:
        2 Mbytes
        5-1/4 1.2 Mbyte or 3-1/2 1.44 Mbyte floppy needed
        MIT compliant with AGE extensions
        Context Sensitive on-line help system
        Cut and paste between X and MS Windows
        Start X applications with MS Windows icons
        Single and multiple window modes
        MS Window manager used with X applications
        Virtual screen up to 32,767 by 32,767
        Passive, telnet, rsh, rexec, and XDMCP startup modes
        Backing store and save unders
        Motif, OpenLook, and DECWindows support
        Full font library in FON format
        BDF to MS Windows FON font compiler
        Log file optionally saves system messages
        Tutorial on the X Window System
===Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows==Microsoft-Windows===

==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==
IBM X-Windows for OS/2
======================
        IBM Solutions Center
        Voice: 1-800-IBM-CALL
        FAX:   1-303-440-1639
        $150 plus $200 for IBM TCP/IP for OS/2 (required)
Latest Version:
        Version 1.2.1
        Part Number 02G6980 (X-Windows)
                    02G6968 (TCP/IP)
        386SX or higher
        6 Mbytes recommended (4 minimum)
Operating System:
        IBM OS/2 2.0 or higher
        OS/2 compatible pointing device
        EGA, VGA, Super VGA, 8514/A, XGA, or other OS/2 supported card
Ethernet Card:
        compatible with OS/2 (NDIS)
Network Software:
        IBM TCP/IP (required)
Disk Space:
        80 Mbyte hard drive
        incorporates X into the OS/2 advanced PC operating system
        provides full X11R4 server, X font library, X font compiler,
                X client utilities
        runs as another object on the WorkPlace Shell (WPS) desktop
        cut and paste between OS/2, DOS, and Windows applications running under
                OS/2 full TCP/IP implementation including ftp, telnet, lamail,
                ping, finger, SLIP, rsh, remote printing, BOOTP, VT100/220, and
                many more
        other modules available, including NFS, Programmer's Toolkit (includes
              Kerberos, RPC, DPI, NCS, ftp API, sockets API, Resolver API),
              and more
==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==OS/2==

=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh
eXodus
======
        White Pine Software, Inc.
        40 Simon Street, Suite 201
        Nashua, HN 03060-3043
        TEL: (603)886-9050
        FAX: (603)886-9051
        email: sdarling@wpine.com
        AppleLink: WHITEPINE
        $295
Latest Version:
        3.0
        all Macintosh computers
        eXodus II runs on Macintosh computers with a 68020 or 68030 processor
                and a floating point co-processor
        2 Mbytes
Operating System:
        version 6.0 or later
        version 6.0.3 or later if you plan to use Communications Toolbox for
                network connections


Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        TCP/IP - MacTCP by Apple Computer, Inc. (part of CommSolutions)
        TCP/IP - TCPort/LAN Workplace by Novell, Inc. (formerly TCPort/Host
                Access)
        DECnet - TSSnet by Thursby Software Systems, Inc. (a special version
                is distributed as part of CommSolutions)
        DECnet - CommUnity-Mac distributed by Everex, Inc.
        DECnet - DECnet for Macintosh (part of PATHWORKS by Digital Equipment
                Corporation)
        ADSP - PATHWORKS distributed by Digital Equipment Corporation
        AppleTalk
Disk Space:

        supports MultiFinder
        under A/UX, clients and server run on the Macintosh
        under Macintosh Operating System, clients run on another computer
        conforms to the Macintosh Human Interface Guidelines
        user standard Macintosh pull-down menus
        functions as a Macintosh program under the Macintosh Operating System
        handles Macintosh events
        can use normal Macintosh environment
=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh

=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh
MacX
====
        Apple Computer, Inc.
        Cupertino, CA 95014
        TEL: (408)996-1010
        TLX: 171-576
        or any Apple dealer (BusinessLand,MicroAGE, etc.)
        MacX                        Order No. M0108LL/C   ??
        MacX Manual Set             Order No. M0602LL/B   ??
        MacX 1.1.7 Update Product   Order No. M1197LL/A   ??
        Mac X and X11 Site License  Order No. M0749LL/C   ??
Latest Version:
        1.2
        any Macintosh
        2 Mbytes
Operating System:
        system software 6.0.5 or later

        1-bit and 8-bit graphics
Ethernet Card:

Network Software:
        LocalTalk, Ethernet
Disk Space:
        at least two floppy disks for 6.0.5 or later
        3.5 Mbytes hard disk tor 7.0
        X11 release 4 server
        ICCCM-compatible cut and paste of text AND graphics between the
                Macintosh and X11
        SHAPE extension (including SHAPED windows on the Macintosh desktop)
        optional built-in ICCCM-compliant window manager
        built-in BDF font compiler
        built-in standard colormaps
        built-in window managers
        support for system software version 7.0
        support for multiple monitors
        copy and paste text and graphics
=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh=Macintosh

=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga==
UNKNOWN
========


Latest Version:



Operating System:



Ethernet Card:

Network Software:

Disk Space:

        Amiga 3000 machines offer an X server and OPEN LOOK tools and libraries
                on a full SVR4 implementation
=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga==

=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga==
X Window System Version 11 Release for the Amiga Computer
=========================================================
        GfxBase, Inc.
        Dale Luck
        1881 Ellwell Drive
        Milpitas, CA 95035
        TEL: (408)262-1469
        FAX: (408)262-8276
        Usenet: boing!dale
        Bix: duck
        amiga!boing!dale@bloom-beacon.mit.edu
     $395.00 ($90.00 yearly maintenance fee)
Latest Version:
        4.1
        AmigaDos computer:
                A1000
                A2000
                A2500
                A3000
                A3000T
                A4000
                A500
                A600
        1 Mbyte for Server and 640x400 2-color display
        more RAM required for local clients
Operating System:
        AmigaDOS Operating System V1.3 or later
        Amiga 2 button mouse, or optical 3 button mouse, tablet, trackball,
                or International keyboard
        NTSC to 1440x482(60hz), PAL(1440x568 50 hz)
        Overscan, genlock and interlace supported
        A2024/Viking 1 1024x8000(60hz), 1024x1024(50hz)
        Super Screens to 2560x2560 scrollable on smaller display
        Productivity screen - 640x480 60hz noninterlaced (640x960 interlaces)
        Two colors out of a palette of 4096 can be selected.  Cursor has two
                separately controlled colors
        Color server: 2,4,8,16,32 colors from 4096.  A2024/Viking 1 - 4 gray
                scales.  Some resolutions restricted
        GDA1 640x480, 800x600, 1024x800 noninterlaced 256/16M
        Ameristar 1600GX 1280x1024, 1600x1280 noninterlaced 256/16M
Ethernet Card:
        Commodore A2065
Network Software:
        Commodore TCP/IP or Syndesis DECnet for ethernet and serial
                connections, SANA for local
Disk Space:
        7-14 Mbytes
        contains X11R4 clients, fonts, etc.
        Amiga Xpr uses the standard Amiga printer device technology which
                supports more that 50 different types of printers.  Black and
                White of Color
        Xamiga R4 monochrome and color servers
        optional programmer's toolkit includes the header files, libraries,
                and sample programs
        Optional mwm window manager
        Optional toolkits/widgets Motif, XView, HP
=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga=Amiga==

=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari=Atari==
X/TOS/window/server and X/TOS/window/server/color
=================================================
        X/software Michael Gehret
        X/TOS division
        Marktstrasse 8
        W-8944 Groenenbach
        Germany
        TEL: +49 8334 1411
        FAX: +49 8334 6245
        email: xtosinfo@xsoft.uucp
        X/TOS/window/server (for all TOS computers)         DM 1,098.00
        X/TOS/window/server/color (for all TOS computers)   DM 1,498.00
        option 030 (for 68030 or 68040 processors only)     DM    98.00
        X/TOS/window/server/color option 030 and option PEX T.B.A.
        overseas order handling                             DM   100.00
        none-EC European order handling                     DM    50.00
Latest Version:
        502.*
        Atari Mega ST, STE, TT
        68000 to 68040
        2 Mbytes (4 Mbytes recommended)
Operating System:
        TOS 1.4 or higher
        Atari mouse
        X/TOS/window/server:
                monochrome 640x400x1,
                monochrome 1280x960x1 (TT, SM194)
        X/TOS/window/server/color:
                monochrome 640x400x1,
                monochrome 1280x960x1 (TT, SM194)
                color 320x200x4
                color 640x200x2
                color 640x480x4
                color 320x480x8
Ethernet Card:
        Atari Card (Mega or VME bus)
        Riebl/Wacker (Mega or VME bus)
--------------------------------- End Enclosure -----------------------------
____________________________________________________________________________
| Peter J. McKinney                     pm860605@longs.LANCE.ColoState.Edu |
| Electrohydrodynamic Laboratory                                           |
| Fluid Mechanics and Wind Engineering Program                             |
| Civil Engineering Department                                             |
| Colorado State University                                                |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

File 36/1144: Setting up a SLIP client under DOS and Windows (long) (85.7%)



I have been posting monthly "how-to-setup a SLIP client on a PC" posts for a 
few months.  Lots of work, and imminent graduation have come in the way of 
posting one of these for March or earlier this month -- for which I apologize.

This file includes information on writing a script for University of Minnesota
PHONE, and also a batch file hack that lets you use other packet drivers with 
PHONE. 

For additions, modifications and corrections, I can be reached at


Best wishes,
Ashok

-- begin SLIP.TXT --
Based on my experiences on setting up SLIP under DOS and Windows,  here
are my comments on setting up SLIP in this environment.  I thank the
Trumpet beta testers and the CWRU SLIP beta testers for their comments.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Configuring your Modem:

a) Turn off DTR (AT&D0&W)
   I have to disable DTR because the communication program that I use
   to dial my SLIP server (QMODEM) drops DTR when I exit the program
   and therefore hangs up the line.  If you use a program like Kermit
   or Conex to establish the SLIP connection, then this need not be done.
   These programs do not necessarily hangup the line when you exit.

   NOTE: If you use Univ. of Minn. PHONE to dial and establish a
         SLIP connection, you do not need to turn off DTR.

b) Dial and establish the SLIP connection first.  This can be done
   automatically if you use a program like PHONE (from the University of
   Minnesota) which will dial and establish a SLIP connection then load the
   SLIP packet driver.  The PHONE scripting language is simple and
   phone scripts can be easily written to configure PHONE to work with
   other SLIP server.  In addition, while the only packet driver
   that PHONE works with is UMSLIP (currently), it is easy to write a
   batch file hack that lets PHONE work with other packet drivers.
   There is a section on PHONE in the document with both script and
   batch file examples.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Configuring the SLIP drivers:

There are five SLIP packet drivers commonly available
CSLIPPER.EXE    Peter Tattam's compressed SLIP driver
SLIPPER.EXE     Peter Tattam's SLIP driver
SLIP8250.COM    Crynwr driver (I like Phil Burn's modified driver)
ETHERSL.COM     Crynwr driver (ethernet simulation over SLIP)
UMSLIP.COM      Univ. of Minnesota driver (based on SLIP8250)

Of these four, I vastly prefer C/SLIPPER.EXE over SLIP8250.COM or
ETHERSL.COM for the following reasons:

a) It is much faster even though my modem has just a 16450 UART
b) While using EtherSLIP/SLIP8250/UMSLIP, myself and several others
   have noticed that the PC clock gets messed up after performing a
   long FTP transfer.
c) It supports PKTMUX when used in ethernet simulation mode
d) When used in Ethernet simulation mode C/SLIPPER seem to work with
   every TCP/IP application that I have tested it with.

Instructions for C/SLIPPER.EXE (and you do not use PHONE)
a) Load SLIPPER in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file according to instructions:
   For instance if you have a v.32bis modem on COM1
   slipper com1 vec=62 baud=57600
b) If you use DOS TCP/IP applications in Win 3.1 DOS boxes, then use the
   double-ended packet driver shim WinPKT.COM -- this creates a virtual
   packet driver at 0x60.  DOS applications in native mode, DOS
   applications in Windows 3.1 DOS boxes and Windows applications can all
   use this virtual driver at 0x60.
   winpkt.com 0x60 0x62
c) If you use QVT/Net, load PKTINT.COM next.  QVT/net is configured in
   QVTNET.INI to use the interrupt at 0x60.
   pktint.com

Instructions for SLIP8250.COM:
a) Try getting a version 10 SLIP driver.  Philip Burns of Northwestern
   University has a modified SLIP8250.COM driver that is better at hardware
   handshaking.  This driver is distributed along with NuPOP.
b) Load the driver AFTER establishing the SLIP connection.  My modem is a
   V.32bis modem on COM1, so here is how I would load the driver.
   slip8250 -w 0x62 -h 4 SLIP 0x03f8 57600
c) As discussed above if you use DOS TCP/IP applications in Windows 3.x
   DOS boxes, you probably want to use WINPKT.COM
   winpkt.com 0x60 0x62
d) If you use WinQVT/net, load PKTINT.COM
   pktint.com

Instructions for ETHERSL.COM:
If you choose to use ETHERSL.COM instead of SLIP8250.COM, the
instructions are exactly the same with one crucial difference.  You
will have to DELETE the line "device=*vcd" from the [386Enh] section
of SYSTEM.INI.  This will interfere with running regular Windows Comm
applications (such as Crosstalk), and you will get lots of dropped
characters etc. in these applications.  This is therefore not
recommended.  ETHERSLIP would be loaded as:
   ethersl -w 0x62 -h 4 0x03f8 57600
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Configuring Windows 3.1:

a) Make the following modifications to the SYSTEM.INI file [386Enh]
   section.
   i) List all your COM ports, with their addresses and interrupts.
       COM1Base=03F8
       COM1Irq=4
       COM2Base=02F8
       COM2Irq=3
       COM3Base=03E8
       COM3Irq=5
       This can also be done from within Windows - Control Panel,
       but double-clicking on the "Ports" icon.
   ii) Give the port to which your modem is attached a generous COM buffer
       COM1Buffer=10000
   iii) Change the COM port AutoAssign value for the COM port that you wish
       to use for your modem to ZERO.  This is the amount of time that
       Windows waits in seconds before handing control of that COM port to
       another application.  If you use WinQVT/net and then want to switch
       from one session to another, and this value is at the default value
       of 2 seconds, you are will get a GPF and Windows will crash.
       COM1AutoAssign=0
       This can also be done from within Windows - Control Panel.
       Double-click on 386 Enhanced, and under "Device Contention", set
       the device contention for the COM port your modem is on to
       "Never Warn"
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Additional notes:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
What to do if you are assigned a different IP address for each
SLIP session?

I am fortunate in that our campus SLIP server assigns each user
a permanent IP address, so I do not have worry about editing QVTNET.INI
each time that I establish a SLIP connection.

If you are assigned a new IP address on every occasion that you dial in,
please try to use BOOTP aware software, and let BOOTP do the
configuration for you.  However, QVTnet is not BOOTP aware and RARP
will not work over a SLIP connection.  To get QVTNet working in a
situation such as this, you must do the following:

Edit the QVTNET.INI file.  Let the [net] section look like this:

[net]
name=
ip=
netmask=255.255.255.0 (or whatever is appropriate for you)
arptime=20
packet_vector=60 (or whatever is appropriate)

Save the changes, and then *write-protect* this file
"attrib +r qvtnet.ini"

Start your slip connection, and *remember* the name and IP address
that you are assigned.  Each time you start QVT/net 3.1x, the
general configuration dialog box will open.  Enter the name and
IP address and you were assigned for that session, click on [OK],
and you should be up and running.  The changes you make will not
be saved, as QVTNET.INI is write-protected.

A more elegant solution to the problem of dynamic SLIP IP address
assignment is provided by Victor Menayang (victor@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu)
Victor uses the program bootpq to semi-automate qvtnet preparation.
Bootpq is used to inquire the assigned IP, which is then saved to a
file called "myip".  Another file "noip" is essentially a complete
QVTNET.INI file that lacks the IP address.  In the final step "myip"
and "noip" are copied into a single QVTNET.INI file.  An example of
Victor's batch file is provided below:
=====================================================
slipper com2
pktint.com
bootpq -i "ip=\"%%s\""  >> myip
bootpq -i "My IP# is: %s"
copy /q net + myip + noip e:\com\qvtnet\qvtnet.ini
del /q myip
@echo off
echo .
echo Ready to run WinQVTnet
=====================================================
For questions and more details about bootpq, please contact Victor
Menayang (victor@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu)

QPC Software is attempting to add BOOTP capability to WinQVT/net.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
How do you use PKTMUX over SLIP?

PKTMUX will not work over the SLIP8250.COM packet driver, and crashes
immediately if used with ETHERSL.COM

PKTMUX will work with C/SLIPPER.EXE, when C/SLIPPER is used in ethernet
simulation mode.  An example of this configuration is shown below:

The latest release of PKTMUX is 1.2c; and it is important that you
use this version, if you want to use virtual packet drivers with
applications like Trumpet for Windows (to be released very shortly).

[from AUTOEXEC.BAT]

lh c/slipper com1 vec=65 baud=57600 ether         (packet driver)
lh pktmux 5 65 /5       (pktmux loaded for 5 virtual packet drivers)
lh pktdrv 7f 65         (first virtual packet driver used for QVT/net)
lh pktint.com           (QVT/net pktint.com)
pktdrv 63 65            (PKTDRV for use in native DOS or WinTrumpet)

Additional virtual packet drivers can be loaded directly from within
Windows 3.1 DOS boxes.  For example, my PIF file to load POPmail is
directed to the file "popmail.bat".  This is what popmail.bat reads
like:

pktdrv 60 65            loads a virtual packet driver at 0x60
cd \popmail
popmail
cd \
pktdrv 60 /u            unloads the packet driver at 0x60
exit                    causes the DOS window to close

I have similar batch files that load other DOS TCP/IP applications
like PC Gopher.  It is my experience that PKTMUX works fine
even if the virtual packet drivers in two independent virtual DOS
sessions, are loaded at the same software interrupt.  For example
within two different DOS boxes -- one for POPmail and the other for
Gopher, the virtual packet driver (pktdrv) is loaded at 0x60 in each
instance.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
How much does PKTMUX degrade the performance of C/SLIPPER?

I have a V.32bis/V.42bis modem in a 386-33 running Windows 3.1 with
a reasonably fast video card (ATI Graphics Ultra).  Under these
conditions, when I have three virtual packet drivers loaded and
being used as follows:
a) Driver at 0x7f -- QVTNet FTP client session
b) Driver at 0x60 in one DOS Window -- CUTCP tn3270 session
c) Driver at 0x60 in another DOS Window -- Trumpet for DOS

I get FTP transfer rates of 0.8 - 1.0 kb/sec while transferring
compressed files.  This rate is comparable to that which I get with
SLIP8250 loaded as a packet driver, and where a single TCP/IP session
is active.  If CSLIPPER is used a packet driver and a single session
is active, I get transfer rates of 1.3 - 1.4 kb/sec on the same
files.

While there is about 40% degradation in the performance of SLIPPER,
for me the benefits of being able to use PKTMUX outweigh the
performance hit.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
C/SLIPPER and ethernet simulation mode

In ethernet simulation mode, C/SLIPPER ver 1.3 works with all the
applications that I have tested it with.  One or two applications
that required ethernet simulation balked at C/SLIPPER 1.2, but even
these rare problems have been resolved with ver 1.3

When SLIPPER is used in ethernet simulation mode, and used with PKTMUX,
I get some an error message in the QVTNet Console window that reads
"IP:incorrect packet type" or "IP:bad version number".  This does not
seem to prevent QVTnet from functioning, although I cannot comment on
loss of performance.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
What can you do if your DOS TCP/IP application does not work with
C/SLIPPER in ethernet simulation mode?

In the rare event that you find a package that does not work with
C/SLIPPER in ethernet simulation mode, first contact the author --
Peter Tattam -- PETER@psychnet.psychol.utas.edu.au, and let him
know.  Chances are that he can fix it.

In the meanwhile, you can try the following.  I do not know if it is
kosher, but it worked when I had problems with C/SLIPPER ver 1.2

(C/SLIPPER is loaded at 0x62 as described above under the PKTMUX section)

I load ETHERSL.COM at 0x60, run the application and then terminate
ETHERSL.COM

This also works within Windows 3.1 virtual DOS boxes.  However a
packet driver like ETHERSL can be used in only one virtual DOS box
at a time.

So for example, here is my batch file to run Grateful Med (a
medical reference retrieval program developed at the National Library
of Medicine).

ethersl -w 0x60 -h 4 0x03f8 57600       loads ETHERSLIP
cd \gm6
search
cd \
termin 0x60                             terminates ETHERSLIP
exit            closes the DOS box and returns me to Windows

If you use this method, be cautious about one thing -- don't have
any active PKTMUX DOS sessions open at the same time.  After closing
the ETHERSL window, you can run your PKTMUX DOS sessions with no
problem.  BTW, the example above -- Grateful Med, works with no
problems with C/SLIPPER ver 1.3
----------------------------------------------------------------------
PHONE Script Files:

The documentation that accompany PHONE, provide good instructions on
writing script files to get PHONE to dial SLIP servers other than
the University of Minnesota server.  For example here is a script
that I use to dial a CISCO server at the University that I attend.

and login with a username and password.  After doing so, I start a SLIP
session with the following command "slip username-slip.dialin.cwru.edu",
followed by my password -- again.

Here then is the relevant portion of the PHONE.CMD script file -
#
# CWRU-TS2 SLIP login script by Ashok Aiyar 3/26/93
# Last revised 3/28/93
Procedure    Host.CWRU.Login
TimeOut 60      'CWRU-TS2 terminal server is not responding'
Message         "CWRU-TS2 SLIP login script -- Version 1.1"
Message         'Waiting for SLIP server to respond'
Quiet ON
Expect 'Verification'
Message         'Request for User Verification Received from CWRU-TS2'
Message         'Sending your user name and password'
Quiet OFF
Expect   'Username:'
Send '%u<'
Expect   'Password:'
Private
Send '%p<'
Reject    'Access denied'   'Your user name or password was not accepted'
TimeOut 30    'SLIP server did not respond to your validation request'
Expect 'CWRU-TS2>'
Send 'SLIP<'
TimeOut 10    'SLIP server did not respond to SLIP command'
Expect 'IP hostname or address:'
Send '%u-slip.dialin.cwru.edu<'
TimeOut 10 'SLIP server did not respond to hostname'
Reject    'Bad IP address'   'Incorrect Hostname'
Expect 'Password:'
Send '%p<'
Reject    'Access denied'    'Password not accepted.'
TimeOut 10
Expect 'Header Compression will match your system'
Message 'Login to CWRU SLIP server successful'
Wait 1.0
EndProcedure   Host.CWRU.Login
#
#
Procedure      Host.CWRU.LogOut
# Nothing special needs to be done to logout
EndProcedure   Host.CWRU.LogOut
#
#   End of Script file
#
----------------------------------------------------------------------
How to use packet drivers other than UMSLIP with PHONE?

The quick answer -- there is no "clean" way.  Below is a batch file
hack that I wrote to use PHONE with other packet drivers.  In this
example, the packet driver is Peter Tattam's CSLIPPER.  To use a
batch file like this, you must know the parameters with which you
plan to use the packet driver -- i.e interrupt vector, baud rate,
port address, and IRQ.  This batch file requires UMSLIP.COM,
CSLIPPER.EXE, and TERMIN.COM to be in the same directory
or in your path ...

All that the BATCH file does is to let you dial the SLIP connection
using PHONE, load the appropriate packet driver, hangup the
connection, and unload the driver when you are done ...

-- being CWRUSLIP.BAT --
@echo off
rem   this batch file is an ugly hack of U. of Minn. "SLIP.BAT"
rem   awaiting a version of C/SLIPPER that can directly interact
rem   with PHONE
rem   CWRUSLIP.BAT file is used with PHONE.EXE to start a SLIP
rem   connection on CWRU-TS2
rem   last modified 3/28/93 -- Ashok Aiyar

@echo off
cls
goto start

:start
if %1. == ?.         goto help
if %1. == help.      goto help
if %1. == setup.     goto setup
if %1. == dial.      goto forceD
if %1. == hangup.    goto forceH
if %1. == quit.      goto forceH
if %1. == HELP.      goto help
if %1. == SETUP.     goto setup
if %1. == DIAL.      goto forceD
if %1. == QUIT.      goto forceH
goto bogus
goto unload

:forceH
termin 0x60
umslip >nul
phone force hangup
goto unload

:slipper
termin 0x60
REM  the following line must be changed to reflect the COM port,
REM  IRQ, baud rate, and software interrupt
lh c:\packet\cslipper com1 vec=60 baud=57600 ether
goto end

:forceD
termin 0x60
umslip >nul
phone force dial
goto slipper

:setup
termin 0x60
umslip >nul
phone setup
goto help

:unload
termin 0x60
goto end

:bogus
echo %1 is not a valid command.
echo Try "cwruslip help" for a list of valid commands
echo.

:help
echo --------------------------------------------------------------
echo           Case Western Reserve University SLIP Setup
echo                  using Univ. of Minnesota PHONE
echo --------------------------------------------------------------
echo cwruslip setup     modem settings, phone number, username etc.
echo.
echo cwruslip dial      DIAL and establish the SLIP connection
echo cwruslip quit      HANGUP the phone and unload the driver
echo cwruslip help      this screen
echo.

:end
-- end CWRUSLIP.BAT --
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Where to Get What.....

Peter Tattam's programs are archived at ftp.utas.edu.au (C/SLIPPER,
and the Trumpet set of programs).

WinQVT/net is generally archived at most Windows FTP sites,
including ftp.cica.indiana.edu

NCSA Telnet is archived at ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu

NuPOP is archived at ftp.acns.nwu.edu

POPmail/PC, SLIPDISK, PHONE, and PC Gopher are archived at
boombox.micro.umn.edu
----------------------------------------------------------------------
-- end SLIP.TXT --



--
Ashok Aiyar                        Mail: ashok@biochemistry.cwru.edu
Department of Biochemistry                       Tel: (216) 368-3300
CWRU School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio         Fax: (216) 368-4544

File 37/1144: Experiences with DOS 6 (82.3%)


(I have been having trouble posting this article from within tin for over
a week. If you do get multiple copies, my apologies.)

Here is a challenge to Microsoft or Microsort Supporters to defend the
pathetic state of DOS 6 as an upgrade distribution -- it is a long story
but would make good reading for those who are interested in knowing the
potential pitfalls of "upgrading" to DOS 6 that I have been able to
notice after only about a week of playing around with it.

My envorinment
==============

TI TravelMate 4000 WinSX (486SX/25) 4M Ram 120M Disk
System BIOS version 1.03 05/21/92 by Texas Instruments
CL-GD6420 VGA BIOS v 1.03 a1 by Cirrus Logic & Quadtel
Advance Power Manager BATTERY.PRO v b6.00 by Texas Instruments
Smart Drive Cache (WIN3.1/DOS6) Parameters: 2048 1024 a- b-
Windows Benchmark WinBench(tm) v 3.11 02/11/93 by ZD Labs

After "updgrading" to DOS 6, I could not understand why certain things
became so slow, especially after I decided to try 'dblspace'.  In the
process of finding out why, I discovered some interesting things.


Disk Performance with Double Space and Smart Drive
==================================================

While most things did not appear to slow down most of the time, certain
applications appeared to run very much slower.  What was interesting is
that commands like 'chkdsk' and 'defrag' were running far too slowly to
consider them useful by any standards.  I suspected Double Space (DS)
and decided to measure its impact on my system using WinBench(tm).

The Real Disk WINMARK of 20350 for the original system (as shipped from
factory with DOS 5 and Windowws 3.1) became 10718 when "upgraded" to
DOS 6 with DS.  Thus there is an effective performance degradation of
more than 50 percent which did not really surprise me because I knew
that DS compression must cost something.

Specifically, for short sequential reads up to 512 bytes, DS actually
*improves* transfer rates by about 10% (because CPU being faster than
I/O, more CPU cycles needed for DS is more than compensated by savings
in I/O cycles).  However, for all other cases, particularly large
random writes, the transfers take up to three times as long.

While the performance depends on the type of access (i.e random or
sequential, small or large transfer units), on the average (based on
WinBench's assumptions), the disk slows down to half its speed.

The tests alone, done in 'real mode' (see WinBench) and with smartdrv
on, do not say much except that it helps to put into those subjective
statements like 'there is no noticable difference in performance' or
even that 'it will speed up disk access when you have a fast CPU and
slow disk I/O'.

This explained why some applications ran markedly slower, but not why
'chkdsk' and 'defrag' (the latter especially) too so long.


Double Space and Windows
========================

DBLSPACE will not run at all from within windows, not even if you
wanted to only to get information, not modify anything, or for that
matter even check on its usage -- try "fasthelp dblspace" in a dos box
within windows and you will see what I mean from the error message you
get.  How narrow minded can a programer get, I wonder.

Yes, this information can be obtained through the mstools.dd add-on to
file manager, but this 'mstools' dll does not understand a compressed
floppy!  (Use the DOS 6 supplement utility to create a compressed
floppy if you dont know how to.)


DOS 6 Defragmenter is incompatible with TI APM
==============================================

Defragmentation seemed to take too much time.  Even so, I waited
patiently till it finished and then ran it again to just to confirm.
This confirmation 'dblspace /def' command for the 120M drive should take
no more than 30 seconds (much faster on other defragmenters I have used)
but it took 12 minutes.

I discovered that if I moved the mouse, defragmentation checking ran
faster (the % figure ticked more rapidly).  It dawned on me that this
had to do with TI's battery saver Advanced Power Management (APM)
module which slows the clock down when it thinks that the CPU is idle,
and it obviously thought DS defragmentation was an idle process!  After
disabling the TI's power saver, this operation took only 20 seconds.


Microsft programmers think TI4000 and Gateway NOMAD users are idiots
====================================================================

In the readme.txt file, you can find the the following

	Running Microsoft Backup with TI4000 and Gateway NOMAD computers
	----------------------------------------------------------------
	To avoid a conflict between the Turbo feature and Microsoft Backup
	for Windows or MS-DOS, add a /L0 switch to the DEVICE command in
	your CONFIG.SYS that loads the BATTERY.PRO file. Or, before you
	run Microsoft Backup, type SETPOWER /L0 at the command prompt.

If you checked TI's manual on the /L0 option, you will realise that it
means "disable all power saving features of your notebook".  Why would
anyone want to run a driver disabled!  As I have found out, not only
does TI's power management interfere with Microsoft Backup as the
readme.txt claims, but 'chkdsk' and 'dblspace' (and who knows what
else) are crippled by the TI's power saver.

It is obvious that there is not such thing as APM specifications.  If
there indeed is such a thing, then either Microsoft programmers or TI
programmers dont know how to read these specifications.  You dont have
to guess as to who are the idiots.

By the way, if you run the advance power management utility, POWER.EXE
in DOS6, when you check the status, it says:

	Power Management Status
	-----------------------
	Setting =  ADV: MAX
	CPU: idle 60% of time.

This figure of 60% seems to be the steady state value on my notebook
when I am running nothing (windows with only program manager in
iconised form).  Does that mean that Windows takes up 40% of my CPU all
for itself, and that I have at best only 60% left for useful work?  Is
such an overhead justified  (whether or not Windows is an operating
system or just another user interface)?  (In DOS alone, it reports 99%
idle time.)  Looks like Windows is a good example of busy waiting type
of package that I like my students to study as the classical 'negative'
example of our times!


Microsoft programmers do not know batch programming
===================================================

I like to structure my startup script and thus have the equivalent of
addpath statements like this:

	set PATH=C:\DOS
	...
	set PATH=C:\ETC\BIN;%PATH%;C:\BIN
	...
	set PATH=C:\ETC\WINDOWS;%PATH%;C:\WINDOWS
	...
	set PATH=%PATH%;C:\BCC\BIN
	...
	set PATH=%PATH%;%MOUSE%

Even though the new dos was installed in the same directory as the old
one (i.e. c:\dos), DOS 6 installation program modifes each and every
path statement, and prepends C:\DOS to its value.  As a result, my
resultant path has so many DOS's.

If the installation program wanted to remove the old DOS path, and add
the new DOS path, clearly it has to only scan for the path statement
containg the old DOS directory and replace it by the new DOS path.
(Even this should only be done if the new DOS is installed in a
directory different from the old one being 'upgraded'.)

Instead, the Microsoft programmer (if you can call this person one)
decided to meddle every path statement I had in the autoexec and
prepend DOS to the value.  I wonder if Microsoft is so desparate that it
would not fire programmers who are incapable of the thought process.

I started a thread on this when DOS 4 came up, and the Microsoft
representative in Singapore called me about this poster.  In fact he
specifically said his US counterparts saw the poster and relayed the
information to him as he did not have access to internet.

Now that has not changed one bit.  In fact, if you have a PATH statement
with %PATH% already in it, is it not obvious that the this statement
should not be touched for any reason?

As another example of the inability of Microsoft programmers to
understand batch programming -- I had the mouse driver invoked as:

	set MOUSE=C:\ETC\MOUSE
	set PATH=%PATH%;%MOUSE%
	loadhigh %MOUSE%\MOUSE.COM

Guess what MEMMAKER did?  It replaced the last statement with

	LH ... C:\ETC\MOUSE\MOUSE.COM

Why is it so difficult just to replace loadhigh with LH and its
parameters, without touching the rest of the line, I do not understand.


DOS 6 Software Quality
======================

DOS 6 is the only operating system I know, in which, under normal usage,
you end up creating a file that you cannot get rid of using of the
commands that come with it.

I am deliberately being cryptic about this:  I challenge Microsoft to
use all its programmers to catch this bug and publish it.  If they dont
within a week, I will post how you can create this "ghost" file.

Surely if I can pick this bug without even looking for it after using a
particular command only twice, I am sure two dozen Microsoft (idiot)
programmers randomly banging on their keyboards over a week could find
it -- that is what I was told how Microsoft "tests the quality" of
their products.

I think it is funny that Microsoft has found ways to "test quality"
when it is accepted in the industry that quality cannot be tested, but
can only be built into the product.  No wonder they cannot provide any
form of guarantees on their products, not even a decent list of bugs
that will prevent scores of user from destroying their disks beyond
repair!

Also, if you run 'dblspace /def' often enough, repeatedly when the disk
is fully defragmented, you may get errors, that was created by the
defragmenters.  I got my IO.SYS file size error and it got truncated
when I did the chkdsk.  This happend only after five successive
defragmentation efforst after the first one supposedly did its job and
with no new file creation since.

Microsft, dont you dare reply to this poster on the network until you
admit that your DS has bugs, and are willing to let us know what we
should watch out for if we have already used DS.

Jaya

--
Dr. Jayasooriah  CSE, CS&E, UNSW | Sign in a Paris hotel:                    
P.O. Box 1, Kensington, NSW 2033 |                                           
Tel/Fax: +61 2 697-5683/313-7987 |    "A sports jacket may be worn to dinner,
Dr. Jayasooriah  CSE, CS&E, UNSW | Sign in a Norwegian cocktail lounge:      
P.O. Box 1, Kensington, NSW 2033 |                      "Ladies are requested
Tel/Fax: +61 2 697-5683/313-7987 |                       not to have children

File 38/1144: FAQ: Typing Injuries (2/4): General Info [monthly posting] (78.5%)



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Answers To Frequently Asked Questions about Typing Injuries
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Typing Injury FAQ -- sources of information for people with typing
injuries, repetitive stress injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, etc.

Copyright 1992,1993 by Dan Wallach 

Many FAQs, including this one, are available on the archive site
pit-manager.mit.edu (alias rtfm.mit.edu) [18.172.1.27] in the directory
pub/usenet/news.answers.  The name under which a FAQ is archived appears
in the Archive-name line at the top of the article.  This FAQ is archived
as typing-injury-faq/general.Z

There's a mail server also.  Just e-mail mail-server@pit-manager.mit.edu
with the word 'help' on a line by itself in the body.

The opinions in here are my own, unless otherwise mentioned, and do not
represent the opinions of any organization or vendor.  I'm not a medical
doctor, so my advice should be taken with many grains of salt.

[Current distribution: sci.med.occupational, sci.med, comp.human-factors,
 {news,sci,comp}.answers, and e-mail to c+health@iubvm.ucs.indiana.edu,
 sorehand@vm.ucsf.edu, and cstg-L@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu]

Changes since previously distributed versions are marked with change        ||
bars to the right of the text, as is this paragraph.                        ||

Table of Contents:
    ==1== Mailing lists, newsgroups, etc.
    ==2== The soda.berkeley.edu archive
    ==3== General info on injuries
    ==4== Typing posture, ergonomics, prevention, treatment
    ==5== Requests for more info
    ==6== References

==1== Mailing lists, newsgroups, etc.

USENET News:
-----------
comp.human-factors occasionally has discussion about alternative input devices.
comp.risks has an occasional posting relevant to injuries via computers.
sci.med and misc.handicap also tend to have relevant traffic.

There's a Brand New newsgroup, sci.med.occupational, chartered specifically
to discuss these things.  This would be the recommended place to post.

Mailing lists:
-------------
The RSI Network: Available both on paper and via e-mail, this publication
    covers issues relevant to those with repetitive stress injuries.  For
    a sample issue and subscription information, send a stamped, self-
    addressed business envelope to Caroline Rose, 970 Paradise Way, Palo
    Alto CA 94306.

    E-mail to 

    $2 donation, requested.

    All RSI Network newsletters are available via anonymous ftp from
    soda.berkeley.edu (see below for details).

c+health and sorehand are both IBM Listserv things.  For those familiar
    with Listserv, here's the quick info:

    c+health -- subscribe to listserv@iubvm.ucs.indiana.edu
		post to c+health@iubvm.ucs.indiana.edu

    sorehand -- subscribe to listserv@vm.ucsf.edu
		post to sorehand@vm.ucsf.edu

Quick tutorial on subscribing to a Listserv:
    % mail listserv@vm.ucsf.edu
    Subject: Total Listserv Mania!

    SUBSCRIBE SOREHAND J. Random Hacker
    INFO ?
    .
That's all there is to it.  You'll get bunches of mail back from the Listserv,
including a list of other possible commands you can mail.  Cool, huh?  What'll
those BITNET people think of, next?

==2== The soda.berkeley.edu archive

I've started an archive site for info related to typing injuries.  Just
anonymous ftp to soda.berkeley.edu:pub/typing-injury.  (128.32.149.19)
Currently, you'll find:

Informative files:
    typing-injury-faq/
        general           -- information about typing injuries
        keyboards         -- products to replace your keyboard
        software          -- software to watch your keyboard usage
	changes		  -- changes since last month's edition (new!)	    ||

    keyboard-commentary   -- Dan's opinions on the keyboard replacements
    amt.advice		  -- about Adverse Mechanical Tension
    caringforwrists.sit.hqx -- PageMaker4 document about your wrists
    caringforwrists.ps	  -- PostScript converted version of above...
    carpal.info           -- info on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
    carpal.explained	  -- very detailed information about CTS
    carpal.surgery	  -- JAMA article on CTS surgery
    carpal.tidbits	  -- TidBITS article on CTS
    tendonitis.info       -- info on Tendonitis
    rsi.biblio		  -- bibliography of RSI-related publications

    rsi-network/*         -- archive of the RSI Network newsletter
			     (currently, containing issues 1 through 11)    ||
    
    rsi.details		  -- long detailed information about RSI
    rsi.physical	  -- study showing RSI isn't just psychological

    Various product literature:

    apple-press		  -- press release on the Apple Adjustable Keyboard
    apple-tidbits	  -- extensive info about Apple's Adjustable Keybd
    bat-info		  -- MacWeek review on the Bat			    ||
    comfort-*		  -- marketing info on the Comfort Keyboard
    datahand-review	  -- detailed opinions of the DataHand
    datahand-review2	  -- follow-up to above
    datahand-desc	  -- description of the DataHand's appearance
    kinesis-review	  -- one user's personal opinions
    maltron-*		  -- marketing info on various Maltron products
    maltron-review	  -- one user's personal opinions
    vertical-info	  -- marketing info on the Vertical (new!)	    ||

    (With the exception of accpak.exe, everything here is distributed as
     source to be compiled with a Unix system.  Some programs take advantage
     of the X window system, also.)

    hsh.shar		  -- a program for one-handed usage of normal keyboards
    typewatch.shar	  -- tells you when to take a break
    xdvorak.c		  -- turns your QWERTY keyboard into Dvorak
    xidle.shar		  -- keeps track of how long you've been typing
    rest-reminder.sh      -- yet another idle watcher
    kt15.tar  		  -- generates fake X keyboard events from the
			     serial port -- use a PC keyboard on anything!
			     (new improved version!)
    accpak.exe		  -- a serial port keyboard spoofer for MS Windows

    (Note: a2x.tar and rk.tar are both from export.lcs.mit.edu:contrib/
     so they may have a more current version than soda.)

    a2x.tar  		  -- a more sophisticated X keyboard/mouse spoofing
			     program.  Supports DragonDictate.
			     (note: a new version is now available)	    ||
    rk.tar  		  -- the reactive keyboard -- predicts what you'll
			     type next -- saves typing

Pictures (in the gifs subdirectory):
    howtosit.gif	  -- picture of good sitting posture
			     (the caringforwrists document is better for this)

    accukey1.gif	  -- fuzzy picture
    accukey2.gif	  -- fuzzy picture with somebody using it
    apple.gif		  -- the Apple Adjustable Keyboard		    ||
    bat.gif               -- the InfoGrip Bat
    comfort.gif           -- the Health Care Comfort Keyboard
    datahand1.gif	  -- fuzzy picture
    datahand2.gif	  -- key layout schematic
    datahand3.gif	  -- a much better picture of the datahand
    flexpro.gif		  -- the Key Tronic FlexPro keyboard		    ||
    kinesis1.gif          -- the Kinesis Ergonomic Keyboard
    kinesis2.gif	  -- multiple views of the Kinesis		    ||
    maltron[1-4].gif      -- several pictures of Maltron products
    mikey1.gif            -- the MIKey
    mikey2.gif            -- Schematic Picture of the MIKey
    tony.gif		  -- The Tony! Ergonomic Keysystem		    ||
    twiddler1.gif	  -- "front" view
    twiddler2.gif	  -- "side" view
    vertical.gif	  -- the Vertical keyboard			    ||
    wave.gif		  -- the Iocomm `Wave' keyboard

Many files are compressed (have a .Z ending).  If you can't uncompress a file
locally, soda will do it.  Just ask for the file, without the .Z extension.

If you're unable to ftp to soda, send me e-mail and we'll see what we
can arrange.

==3== General info on injuries

First, and foremost of importance: if you experience pain at all, then
you absolutely need to go see a doctor.  As soon as you possibly can.  The
difference of a day or two can mean the difference between a short recovery
and a long, drawn-out ordeal.  GO SEE A DOCTOR.  Now, your garden-variety
doctor may not necessarily be familiar with this sort of injury.  Generally,
any hospital with an occupational therapy clinic will offer specialists in
these kinds of problems.  DON'T WAIT, THOUGH.  GO SEE A DOCTOR.

The remainder of this information is paraphrased, without permission, from
a wonderful report by New Zealand's Department of Labour (Occupational
Safety and Health Service): "Occupational Overuse Syndrome. Treatment and

First, a glossary (or, fancy names for how you shouldn't have your hands):
(note: you're likely to hear these terms from doctors and keyboard vendors :)

  RSI: Repetitive Strain Injury - a general term for many kinds of injuries
  OOS: Occupational Overuse Syndrome -- synonym for RSI
  CTD: Cumulative Trauma Disorder -- another synonym for RSI
  WRULD: Work-Related Upper Limb Disorders -- yet another synonym for RSI
  CTS: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (see below)
  Hyperextension:  Marked bending at a joint.
  Pronation: Turning the palm down.
  Wrist extension: Bending the wrist up.
  Supination: Turning the palm up.
  Wrist flexion: Bending the wrist down.
  Pinch grip: The grip used for a pencil.
  Ulnar deviation: Bending the wrist towards the little finger.
  Power grip: The grip used for a hammer.
  Radial Deviation: Bending the wrist toward the thumb.
  Abduction: Moving away from the body.
  Overspanning: Opening the fingers out wide.

Now then, problems come in two main types: Local conditions and diffuse
conditions.  Local problems are what you'd expect: specific muscles,
tendons, tendon sheaths, nerves, etc. being inflamed or otherwise hurt.
Diffuse conditions, often mistaken for local problems, can involve muscle
discomfort, pain, burning and/or tingling; with identifiable areas of
tenderness in muscles, although they're not necessarily "the problem."

--- Why does Occupational Overuse Syndrome occur?  Here's the theory.

Normally, your muscles and tendons get blood through capillaries which
pass among the muscle fibers.  When you tense a muscle, you restrict
the blood flow.  By the time you're exerting 50% of your full power,
you're completely restricting your blood flow.

Without fresh blood, your muscles use stored energy until they run out,
then they switch to anaerobic (without oxygen) metabolism, which generates
nasty by-products like lactic acid, which cause pain.

Once one muscle hurts, all its neighbors tense up, perhaps to relieve the
load.  This makes sense for your normal sort of injury, but it only makes
things worse with repetitive motion.  More tension means less blood flow,
and the cycle continues.

Another by-product of the lack of blood flow is tingling and numbness from
your nerves.  They need blood too.

Anyway, when you're typing too much, you're never really giving a change
for the blood to get back where it belongs, because your muscles never
relax enough to let the blood through.  Stress, poor posture, and poor
ergonomics, only make things worse.

--- Specific injuries you may have heard of:

(note: most injuries come in two flavors: acute and chronic.  Acute
injuries are severely painful and noticable.  Chronic conditions have
less pronounced symptoms but are every bit as real.)

Tenosynovitis -- an inflamation of the tendon sheath.  Chronic tenosynovitis
occurs when the repetitive activity is mild or intermittent: not enough to
cause acute inflamation, but enough to exceed the tendon sheath's ability
to lubricate the tendon.  As a result, the tendon sheath thickens, gets
inflamed, and you've got your problem.

Tendonitis -- an inflammation of a tendon.  Repeated tensing of a tendon
can cause inflamation.  Eventually, the fibers of the tendon start separating,
and can even break, leaving behind debris which induces more friction, more
swelling, and more pain.  "Sub-acute" tendonitis is more common, which entails
a dull ache over the wrist and forearm, some tenderness, and it gets worse
with repetitive activity.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome -- the nerves that run through your wrist into your
fingers get trapped by the inflamed muscles around them.  Symptoms include
feeling "pins and needles", tingling, numbness, and even loss of sensation.
CTS is often confused for a diffuse condition.

Adverse Mechanical Tension -- also known as 'neural tension', this is where
the nerves running down to your arm have become contracted and possibly
compressed as a result of muscle spasms in the shoulders and elsewhere.
AMT can often misdiagnosed as or associated with one of the other OOS 
disorders.  It is largely reversible and can be treated with physiotherapy 
(brachial plexus stretches and trigger point therapy).

a way to injure it.  By now, you should be getting an idea of how OOS
conditions occur and why.  Just be careful: many inexperienced doctors
misdiagnose problems as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, when in reality, you
may have a completely different problem.  Always get a second opinion
before somebody does something drastic to you (like surgery).

==4== Typing posture, ergonomics, prevention, treatment

The most important element of both prevention and recovery is to reduce
tension in the muscles and tendons.  This requires learning how to relax.
If you're under a load of stress, this is doubly important.  Tune out
the world and breath deep and regular.  Relaxing should become a guiding
principle in your work: every three minutes take a three second break.
EVERY THREE MINUTES, TAKE A THREE SECOND BREAK.  Really, do it every
three minutes.  It's also helpful to work in comfortable surroundings,
calm down, and relax.

If you can't sleep, you really need to focus on this.  Rest, sleep, and
relaxation are really a big deal.

There are all kinds of other treatments, of course.  Drugs can reduce
inflamation and pain.  Custom-molded splints can forcefully prevent bad
posture.  Surgery can fix some problems.  Exercise can help strengthen
your muscles.  Regular stretching can help prevent injury.  Good posture
and a good ergonomic workspace promote reduced tension.  Ice or hot-cold
contrast baths also reduce swelling.  Only your doctor can say what's best
for you.

--- Posture -- here are some basic guidelines.  [I so liked the way this was
written in the New Zealand book that I'm lifting it almost verbatim from
Appendix 10. -- dwallach]

. Let your shoulders relax.
. Let your elbows swing free.
. Keep your wrists straight.
. Pull your chin in to look down - don't flop your head forward.
. Keep the hollow in the base of your spine.
. Try leaning back in the chair.
. Don't slouch or slump forward.
. Alter your posture from time to time.
. Every 20 minutes, get up and bend your spine backward.

Set the seat height, first.  Your feet should be flat on the floor.  There 
should be no undue pressure on the underside of your thighs near the knees,
and your thighs should not slope too much.

Now, draw yourself up to your desk and see that its height is comfortable
to work at.  If you are short, this may be impossible.  The beest remedy
is to raise the seat height and prevent your legs from dangling by using a
footrest.

Now, adjust the backrest height so that your buttocks fit into the space
between the backrest and the seat pan.  The backrest should support you in
the hollow of your back, so adjust its tilt to give firm support in this
area.

If you operate a keyboard, you will be able to spend more time leaning
back, so experiment with a chair with a taller backrest, if available.

[Now, I diverge a little from the text]

A good chair makes a big difference.  If you don't like your chair, go
find a better one.  You really want adjustments for height, back angle,
back height, and maybe even seat tilt.  Most arm rests seem to get in
the way, although some more expensive chairs have height adjustable arm
rests which you can also rotate out of the way.  You should find a good
store and play with all these chairs -- pick one that's right for you.
In the San Francisco Bay Area, I highly recommend "Just Chairs."  The
name says it all.

--- Keyboard drawers, wrist pads, and keyboard replacements:

There is a fair amount of controvery on how to get this right.  For some
people, wrist pads seem to work wonders.  However, with good posture, you
shouldn't be resting your wrists on anything -- you would prefer your
keyboard to be "right there".  If you drop your arms at your side and then
lift your hands up at the elbow, you want your keyboard under your hands
when your elbows are at about 90 degrees.  Of course, you want to avoid
pronation, wrist extension, and ulnar deviation at all costs.  Wrist pads
may or may not help at this.  You should get somebody else to come and
look at how you work: how you sit, how you type, and how you relax.  It's
often easier for somebody else to notice your hunched shoulders or
deviated hands.

Some argue that the normal, flat keyboard is antiquated and poorly
designed.  A number of replacements are available, on the market, today.
Check out the accompanying typing-injury-faq/keyboards for much detail.

==5== Requests for more info

Clearly, the above information is incomplete.  The typing-injury archive
is incomplete.  There's always more information out there.  If you'd like
to submit something, please send me mail, and I'll gladly throw it in.

If you'd like to maintain a list of products or vendors, that would be
wonderful!  I'd love somebody to make a list of chair/desk vendors.  I'd
love somebody to make a list of doctors.  I'd love somebody to edit the
above sections, looking for places where I've obviously goofed.

==6== References

I completely rewrote the information section here, using a wonderful
guide produced in New Zealand by their Occupational Safety & Health
Service, a service of their Department of Labour.  Special thanks
to the authors: Wigley, Turner, Blake, Darby, McInnes, and Harding.

Semi-bibliographic reference:
    . Occupational Overuse Syndrome
    . Treatment and Rehabilitation:
      A Practitioner's Guide
    
    Published by the Occupational Safety and Health Service
    Department of Labour
    Wellington,
    New Zealand.

    First Edition: June 1992
    ISBN 0-477-3499-3

    Price: $9.95 (New Zealand $'s, of course)

Thanks to Richard Donkin  for reviewing this posting.

-- 
Dan Wallach               "One of the most attractive features of a Connection
dwallach@cs.berkeley.edu  Machine is the array of blinking lights on the faces
Office#: 510-642-9585     of its cabinet." -- CM Paris Ref. Manual, v6.0, p48.

File 39/1144: Glasgow RX - remote execution of X programs, Part01/01 (86.3%)


[[ I posted this a few weeks back, but all I got back was an error
   message "pnews: /dev/null: Permission denied".  Yep, /dev/null
   had a mode of 600.  (Arrghhh!!)  ]]

With renewed interest in "setting the DISPLAY variable", etc.. I
thought I would post my contribution.

This Perl script is my solution.  It trys to be intelligent about
what it's doing so that you should be able to type "rx host.domain.etc",
and get a xterm running on "host.domain.etc", with all the difficult
stuff taken care of.

In theory, this program can do *everything* you ever wanted to do
when you wanted to run a remote command in the background - it
doesn't even need to be an X program.  Try a "rx big-machine make"
for instance, for a backgrounded make on the remote "big-machine".

For more details and a full list of features read the README file,
about 20 lines below...  All comments welcome.

Duncan.



#! /bin/sh
# This is a shell archive.  Remove anything before this line, then unpack
# it by saving it into a file and typing "sh file".  To overwrite existing
# files, type "sh file -c".  You can also feed this as standard input via
# unshar, or by typing "sh <file", e.g..  If this archive is complete, you
# will see the following message at the end:
#		"End of archive 1 (of 1)."
# Contents:  README Imakefile MANIFEST Makefile rx.man rx.pl
# Wrapped by sinclair@dcs.gla.ac.uk on Thu Apr  8 18:47:48 1993
PATH=/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/ucb ; export PATH
if test -f 'README' -a "${1}" != "-c" ; then 
  echo shar: Will not clobber existing file \"'README'\"
else
echo shar: Extracting \"'README'\" \(1442 characters\)
sed "s/^X//" >'README' <<'END_OF_FILE'
X
X   Glasgow RX - remote execution of X programs.  Version 3.1.7
X
XCopyright 1992 Duncan Sinclair 
X
XTrivial to install, but there's an Imakefile to make it even more trivial.
X
XThe perl script needs some customisation before it is installed, just
Xedit the "rx.pl" file, and read the comments.  Once you've done
Xthis you can "xmkmf", then "make install install.man".
X
X
X*) Does the right thing for off-site remote execution.  Including
X   setting up $DISPLAY to include domain names, and passing
X   magic cookies, or doing the "xhost" stuff.
X
X*) Allow different remote user name.  (rx -l user host ...)
X
X*) Smart quoting of arguments - makes passing wild-cards easy.
X
X*) Custom command execution - link it to "remacs" to get a remote
X   emacs command.
X
X*) Automatic xterm options - names the xterm according to hostname,
X   and turns on "login shell".
X
X*) Default command is xterm.
X
X*) Propagates X-ish env. variables to remote session - user may
X   extend the list of variables to pass.
X
X*) Special handling for bourne shell users.
X
X*) Tries to do remote execution from same directory as local.
X   That is, it propagates $PWD, in an intelligent manner.
X
X*) Logs errors in a file.
X
X*) Overall Intelligence (TM) - makes reasoned decisions about what
X   you are trying to do, and tries to "do the right thing".
X
X*) Written in Perl, for portability and hackability.
X
XFor more info, read the man page or the source.
X
END_OF_FILE
if test 1442 -ne `wc -c <'README'`; then
    echo shar: \"'README'\" unpacked with wrong size!
fi
# end of 'README'
fi
if test -f 'Imakefile' -a "${1}" != "-c" ; then 
  echo shar: Will not clobber existing file \"'Imakefile'\"
else
echo shar: Extracting \"'Imakefile'\" \(370 characters\)
sed "s/^X//" >'Imakefile' <<'END_OF_FILE'
X# Glasgow RX Imakefile.
X
X         PROGRAMS = rx
X
X
X
XInstallNamedProg(rx.pl,rx,$(BINDIR))
XInstallManPage(rx,$(MANDIR))
X
X	$(RM) $(BINDIR)/rxterm
X	$(LN) $(BINDIR)/rx $(BINDIR)/rxterm
X
X	@grep -s 'debug = 0' rx.pl || false
X
X	makekit -m -p
X	@-perl -pi -e "s/sinclair@dcs.gla.ac.uk/sinclair@dcs.gla.ac.uk/;" Part*
X
END_OF_FILE
if test 370 -ne `wc -c <'Imakefile'`; then
    echo shar: \"'Imakefile'\" unpacked with wrong size!
fi
# end of 'Imakefile'
fi
if test -f 'MANIFEST' -a "${1}" != "-c" ; then 
  echo shar: Will not clobber existing file \"'MANIFEST'\"
else
echo shar: Extracting \"'MANIFEST'\" \(313 characters\)
sed "s/^X//" >'MANIFEST' <<'END_OF_FILE'
X   File Name		Archive #	Description
X-----------------------------------------------------------
X README                     1	Read me first
X Imakefile                  1	
X MANIFEST                   1	This shipping list
X Makefile                   1	
X rx.man                     1	
X rx.pl                      1	
END_OF_FILE
if test 313 -ne `wc -c <'MANIFEST'`; then
    echo shar: \"'MANIFEST'\" unpacked with wrong size!
fi
# end of 'MANIFEST'
fi
if test -f 'Makefile' -a "${1}" != "-c" ; then 
  echo shar: Will not clobber existing file \"'Makefile'\"
else
echo shar: Extracting \"'Makefile'\" \(10172 characters\)
sed "s/^X//" >'Makefile' <<'END_OF_FILE'
X# Makefile generated by imake - do not edit!
X# $XConsortium: imake.c,v 1.65 91/07/25 17:50:17 rws Exp $
X#
X# The cpp used on this machine replaces all newlines and multiple tabs and
X# spaces in a macro expansion with a single space.  Imake tries to compensate
X# for this, but is not always successful.
X#
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# Makefile generated from "Imake.tmpl" and 
X# $XConsortium: Imake.tmpl,v 1.139 91/09/16 08:52:48 rws Exp $
X#
X# Platform-specific parameters may be set in the appropriate .cf
X# configuration files.  Site-specific parameters should be set in the file
X# site.def.  Full rebuilds are recommended if any parameters are changed.
X#
X# If your C preprocessor does not define any unique symbols, you will need
X# to set BOOTSTRAPCFLAGS when rebuilding imake (usually when doing
X# "make World" the first time).
X#
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# site-specific configuration parameters that need to come before
X# the platform-specific parameters - edit site.def to change
X
X# site:  $XConsortium: site.def,v 1.2 91/07/30 20:26:44 rws Exp $
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# platform-specific configuration parameters - edit sun.cf to change
X
X# platform:  $XConsortium: sun.cf,v 1.72.1.1 92/03/18 13:13:37 rws Exp $
X
X# operating system:  SunOS 4.1.3
X
X# $XConsortium: sunLib.rules,v 1.7 91/12/20 11:19:47 rws Exp $
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# site-specific configuration parameters that go after
X# the platform-specific parameters - edit site.def to change
X
X# site:  $XConsortium: site.def,v 1.2 91/07/30 20:26:44 rws Exp $
X
X            SHELL = /bin/sh
X
X              TOP = .
X      CURRENT_DIR = .
X
X               AR = ar cq
X  BOOTSTRAPCFLAGS =
X               CC = gcc -fpcc-struct-return
X               AS = as
X
X         COMPRESS = compress
X              CPP = /lib/cpp $(STD_CPP_DEFINES)
X    PREPROCESSCMD = gcc -fpcc-struct-return -E $(STD_CPP_DEFINES)
X          INSTALL = install
X               LD = ld
X             LINT = lint
X      LINTLIBFLAG = -C
X         LINTOPTS = -axz
X               LN = ln -s
X             MAKE = make
X               MV = mv
X               CP = cp
X
X           RANLIB = ranlib
X  RANLIBINSTFLAGS =
X
X               RM = rm -f
X            TROFF = psroff
X         MSMACROS = -ms
X              TBL = tbl
X              EQN = eqn
X     STD_INCLUDES =
X  STD_CPP_DEFINES =
X      STD_DEFINES =
X EXTRA_LOAD_FLAGS =
X  EXTRA_LIBRARIES =
X             TAGS = ctags
X
X    SHAREDCODEDEF = -DSHAREDCODE
X         SHLIBDEF = -DSUNSHLIB
X
X    PROTO_DEFINES =
X
X     INSTPGMFLAGS =
X
X     INSTBINFLAGS = -m 0755
X     INSTUIDFLAGS = -m 4755
X     INSTLIBFLAGS = -m 0644
X     INSTINCFLAGS = -m 0444
X     INSTMANFLAGS = -m 0444
X     INSTDATFLAGS = -m 0444
X    INSTKMEMFLAGS = -g kmem -m 2755
X
X      PROJECTROOT = /usr/X11
X
X     TOP_INCLUDES = -I$(INCROOT)
X
X      CDEBUGFLAGS = -O2
X        CCOPTIONS =
X
X      ALLINCLUDES = $(INCLUDES) $(EXTRA_INCLUDES) $(TOP_INCLUDES) $(STD_INCLUDES)
X       ALLDEFINES = $(ALLINCLUDES) $(STD_DEFINES) $(EXTRA_DEFINES) $(PROTO_DEFINES) $(DEFINES)
X           CFLAGS = $(CDEBUGFLAGS) $(CCOPTIONS) $(ALLDEFINES)
X        LINTFLAGS = $(LINTOPTS) -DLINT $(ALLDEFINES)
X
X           LDLIBS = $(SYS_LIBRARIES) $(EXTRA_LIBRARIES)
X
X        LDOPTIONS = $(CDEBUGFLAGS) $(CCOPTIONS) $(LOCAL_LDFLAGS) -L$(USRLIBDIR)
X
X   LDCOMBINEFLAGS = -X -r
X      DEPENDFLAGS =
X
X        MACROFILE = sun.cf
X           RM_CMD = $(RM) *.CKP *.ln *.BAK *.bak *.o core errs ,* *~ *.a .emacs_* tags TAGS make.log MakeOut
X
X    IMAKE_DEFINES =
X
X         IRULESRC = $(CONFIGDIR)
X        IMAKE_CMD = $(IMAKE) -DUseInstalled -I$(IRULESRC) $(IMAKE_DEFINES)
X
X     ICONFIGFILES = $(IRULESRC)/Imake.tmpl $(IRULESRC)/Imake.rules \
X			$(IRULESRC)/Project.tmpl $(IRULESRC)/site.def \
X			$(IRULESRC)/$(MACROFILE) $(EXTRA_ICONFIGFILES)
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# X Window System Build Parameters
X# $XConsortium: Project.tmpl,v 1.138.1.1 92/11/11 09:49:19 rws Exp $
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# X Window System make variables; this need to be coordinated with rules
X
X          PATHSEP = /
X        USRLIBDIR = /usr/X11/lib
X           BINDIR = /usr/X11/local/bin
X          INCROOT = /usr/X11/include
X     BUILDINCROOT = $(TOP)
X      BUILDINCDIR = $(BUILDINCROOT)/X11
X      BUILDINCTOP = ..
X           INCDIR = $(INCROOT)/X11
X           ADMDIR = /usr/adm
X           LIBDIR = $(USRLIBDIR)/X11
X        CONFIGDIR = $(LIBDIR)/config
X       LINTLIBDIR = $(USRLIBDIR)/lint
X
X          FONTDIR = $(LIBDIR)/fonts
X         XINITDIR = $(LIBDIR)/xinit
X           XDMDIR = $(LIBDIR)/xdm
X           TWMDIR = $(LIBDIR)/twm
X          MANPATH = /usr/X11/man
X    MANSOURCEPATH = $(MANPATH)/man
X        MANSUFFIX = n
X     LIBMANSUFFIX = 3
X           MANDIR = $(MANSOURCEPATH)$(MANSUFFIX)
X        LIBMANDIR = $(MANSOURCEPATH)$(LIBMANSUFFIX)
X           NLSDIR = $(LIBDIR)/nls
X        PEXAPIDIR = $(LIBDIR)/PEX
X      XAPPLOADDIR = $(LIBDIR)/app-defaults
X       FONTCFLAGS = -t
X
X     INSTAPPFLAGS = $(INSTDATFLAGS)
X
X            IMAKE = imake
X           DEPEND = makedepend
X              RGB = rgb
X
X            FONTC = bdftopcf
X
X        MKFONTDIR = mkfontdir
X        MKDIRHIER = /bin/sh $(BINDIR)/mkdirhier
X
X        CONFIGSRC = $(TOP)/config
X       DOCUTILSRC = $(TOP)/doc/util
X        CLIENTSRC = $(TOP)/clients
X          DEMOSRC = $(TOP)/demos
X           LIBSRC = $(TOP)/lib
X          FONTSRC = $(TOP)/fonts
X       INCLUDESRC = $(TOP)/X11
X        SERVERSRC = $(TOP)/server
X          UTILSRC = $(TOP)/util
X        SCRIPTSRC = $(UTILSRC)/scripts
X       EXAMPLESRC = $(TOP)/examples
X       CONTRIBSRC = $(TOP)/../contrib
X           DOCSRC = $(TOP)/doc
X           RGBSRC = $(TOP)/rgb
X        DEPENDSRC = $(UTILSRC)/makedepend
X         IMAKESRC = $(CONFIGSRC)
X         XAUTHSRC = $(LIBSRC)/Xau
X          XLIBSRC = $(LIBSRC)/X
X           XMUSRC = $(LIBSRC)/Xmu
X       TOOLKITSRC = $(LIBSRC)/Xt
X       AWIDGETSRC = $(LIBSRC)/Xaw
X       OLDXLIBSRC = $(LIBSRC)/oldX
X      XDMCPLIBSRC = $(LIBSRC)/Xdmcp
X      BDFTOSNFSRC = $(FONTSRC)/bdftosnf
X      BDFTOSNFSRC = $(FONTSRC)/clients/bdftosnf
X      BDFTOPCFSRC = $(FONTSRC)/clients/bdftopcf
X     MKFONTDIRSRC = $(FONTSRC)/clients/mkfontdir
X         FSLIBSRC = $(FONTSRC)/lib/fs
X    FONTSERVERSRC = $(FONTSRC)/server
X     EXTENSIONSRC = $(TOP)/extensions
X         XILIBSRC = $(EXTENSIONSRC)/lib/xinput
X        PEXLIBSRC = $(EXTENSIONSRC)/lib/PEXlib
X      PHIGSLIBSRC = $(EXTENSIONSRC)/lib/PEX
X
X# $XConsortium: sunLib.tmpl,v 1.14.1.2 92/11/11 09:55:02 rws Exp $
X
XSHLIBLDFLAGS = -assert pure-text
XPICFLAGS = -fpic
X
X  DEPEXTENSIONLIB =
X     EXTENSIONLIB = -lXext
X
X          DEPXLIB = $(DEPEXTENSIONLIB)
X             XLIB = $(EXTENSIONLIB) -lX11
X
X        DEPXMULIB = $(USRLIBDIR)/libXmu.sa.$(SOXMUREV)
X       XMULIBONLY = -lXmu
X           XMULIB = -lXmu
X
X       DEPOLDXLIB =
X          OLDXLIB = -loldX
X
X      DEPXTOOLLIB = $(USRLIBDIR)/libXt.sa.$(SOXTREV)
X         XTOOLLIB = -lXt
X
X        DEPXAWLIB = $(USRLIBDIR)/libXaw.sa.$(SOXAWREV)
X           XAWLIB = -lXaw
X
X        DEPXILIB =
X           XILIB = -lXi
X
X        DEPPEXLIB =
X           PEXLIB = -lPEX5
X
X        SOXLIBREV = 4.10
X          SOXTREV = 4.10
X         SOXAWREV = 5.0
X        SOOLDXREV = 4.10
X         SOXMUREV = 4.10
X        SOXEXTREV = 4.10
X      SOXINPUTREV = 4.10
X         SOPEXREV = 1.0
X
X      DEPXAUTHLIB = $(USRLIBDIR)/libXau.a
X         XAUTHLIB =  -lXau
X      DEPXDMCPLIB = $(USRLIBDIR)/libXdmcp.a
X         XDMCPLIB =  -lXdmcp
X
X        DEPPHIGSLIB = $(USRLIBDIR)/libphigs.a
X           PHIGSLIB =  -lphigs
X
X       DEPXBSDLIB = $(USRLIBDIR)/libXbsd.a
X          XBSDLIB =  -lXbsd
X
X LINTEXTENSIONLIB = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lXext.ln
X         LINTXLIB = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lX11.ln
X          LINTXMU = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lXmu.ln
X        LINTXTOOL = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lXt.ln
X          LINTXAW = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lXaw.ln
X           LINTXI = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lXi.ln
X          LINTPEX = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lPEX5.ln
X        LINTPHIGS = $(LINTLIBDIR)/llib-lphigs.ln
X
X          DEPLIBS = $(DEPXAWLIB) $(DEPXMULIB) $(DEPXTOOLLIB) $(DEPXLIB)
X
X         DEPLIBS1 = $(DEPLIBS)
X         DEPLIBS2 = $(DEPLIBS)
X         DEPLIBS3 = $(DEPLIBS)
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# Imake rules for building libraries, programs, scripts, and data files
X# rules:  $XConsortium: Imake.rules,v 1.123 91/09/16 20:12:16 rws Exp $
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# start of Imakefile
X
X# Glasgow RX Imakefile.
X
X         PROGRAMS = rx
X
X
X
X	@if [ -d $(DESTDIR)$(BINDIR) ]; then set +x; \
X	else (set -x; $(MKDIRHIER) $(DESTDIR)$(BINDIR)); fi
X	$(INSTALL) -c $(INSTBINFLAGS) rx.pl $(DESTDIR)$(BINDIR)/rx
X
X	@if [ -d $(DESTDIR)$(MANDIR) ]; then set +x; \
X	else (set -x; $(MKDIRHIER) $(DESTDIR)$(MANDIR)); fi
X	$(INSTALL) -c $(INSTMANFLAGS) rx.man $(DESTDIR)$(MANDIR)/rx.$(MANSUFFIX)
X
X	$(RM) $(BINDIR)/rxterm
X	$(LN) $(BINDIR)/rx $(BINDIR)/rxterm
X
X	@grep -s 'debug = 0' rx.pl || false
X
X	makekit -m -p
X	@-perl -pi -e "s/sinclair@dcs.gla.ac.uk/sinclair@dcs.gla.ac.uk/;" Part*
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# common rules for all Makefiles - do not edit
X
X
X	$(RM_CMD) "#"*
X
X	-@if [ -f Makefile ]; then set -x; \
X	$(RM) Makefile.bak; $(MV) Makefile Makefile.bak; \
X	else exit 0; fi
X	$(IMAKE_CMD) -DTOPDIR=$(TOP) -DCURDIR=$(CURRENT_DIR)
X
X	$(TAGS) -w *.[ch]
X	$(TAGS) -xw *.[ch] > TAGS
X
X	# load $(ALLDEFINES) $(SRCS)
X
X	# load $(ALLDEFINES) $(OBJS)
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# empty rules for directories that do not have SUBDIRS - do not edit
X
X	@echo "install in $(CURRENT_DIR) done"
X
X	@echo "install.man in $(CURRENT_DIR) done"
X
X
X
X# -------------------------------------------------------------------------
X# dependencies generated by makedepend
X
END_OF_FILE
if test 10172 -ne `wc -c <'Makefile'`; then
    echo shar: \"'Makefile'\" unpacked with wrong size!
fi
# end of 'Makefile'
fi
if test -f 'rx.man' -a "${1}" != "-c" ; then 
  echo shar: Will not clobber existing file \"'rx.man'\"
else
echo shar: Extracting \"'rx.man'\" \(3551 characters\)
sed "s/^X//" >'rx.man' <<'END_OF_FILE'
X.TH RX 1 "4 March 1993" "X Version 11"
X.SH NAME
Xrx,rxterm,r* - remote command, xterm, anything execution
X.SH SYNOPSIS
X.B rx
X[
X.B \-l
X.I username
X]
X.I host
X[
X.I command
X]
X.br
X.B rxterm
X[
X.B \-l
X.I username
X]
X.I host
X[
X.IR args .\|.\|.
X]
X.SH DESCRIPTION
XThe 
X.B rx
Xprogram connect to the specified
X.I host
Xand executes the specified
X.I command
Xin the background, returning immediately.  To allow the execution
Xof X programs, it copies a number of environmental variables to
Xthe remote session.  If you omit
X.IR command ,
Xthen rx will start an xterm on the remote host.  The
X.B rxterm
Xvarient starts a remote xterm on a host, and also passes
X.I args
Xto the remote xterm as arguments.
X.PP
XShell metacharacters which are not quoted are interpreted on the local
Xmachine, while quoted metacharacters are interpreted on the remote
Xmachine.
X.PP
XIf the name of the file from which
X.B rx
Xis executed is anything other than ``rx,''
X.B rx
Xtakes this name, stripped on a leading ``r'' as the command
Xto run on the remote host, using any
X.I command
Xparameters as arguments for the remote command.
X.PP
XIf
X.B rx
Xthinks you are using
X.B xauth
Xbased X authorisation, and you are calling to a off-site host, or
Xto a different username, it will attempt to copy an authorization
Xkey to the remote account.  Otherwise it will try to use
X.B xhost(1)
Xto grant access to the remote host.
X.SH OPTIONS
X.TP
X.BI \-l " username"
XUse
X.I username
Xas the remote username instead of your local username.  In the absence
Xof this option, the remote username is the same as your local username.
X
X.SH ENVIRONMENT
XIf set, the values of PATH, DISPLAY, XENVIRONMENT, XAPPLRESDIR,
XXFILESEARCHPATH, XUSERFILESEARCHPATH, OPENWINHOME, LD_LIBRARY_PATH,
Xand XAUTHORITY are exported to the remote program, unless the
Xremote username is different, or the remote host is off-site, in which
Xcase only DISPLAY is exported, with in all cases any variables named in the
Xvariable RXENV.
X.PP
XThe DISPLAY variable is tweaked as appropriate, to contain as qualified
Xa hostname as is needed.
X.SH DIAGNOSTICS
X.TP
X.IB command ": don't recognise my name."
X.B rx
Xcannot decode the name it has been called under.  In this case
Xit prints a warning message, and continues, as normal.
X.TP
X.B "rx: usage: rx [-l username] hostname [args...]"
XThis means it could not decode the arguments given to it.
X.SH AUTHOR
XDuncan Sinclair , July 1992
X.br
XOriginally based on a program with the same name from the
X.B gwm
Xdistribution.  To distinguish this "rx" from other programs
Xwith similar names, you should refer to this program as the
X.B Glasgow
X.BR rx .
X.SH "SEE ALSO"
XX(1), rsh(1), xterm(1), xauth(1), xhost(1), gwm(1)
X.SH BUGS
X.B Rx
Xmakes a number of assumptions about the relationship between the
Xlocal user, and the remote one, depending on whether the remote
Xhost is onsite or not, and whether an alternative username was used
Xor not.
X.PP
XIn particular, if either the locally used shell, or the remotely
Xused shell is the standard Bourne Shell,
X.B sh(1)
Xthen strange things are more likely to happen.  Especially when 
Xit's only one of them.
X.PP
XSometimes quoting can get messed up.
X.PP
XIt's too easy to fool the smarts in
X.B rx
Xto make it believe something that is not true, and fail because of it.
X.PP
XWhen
X.B rx
Xuses
X.B xhost
Xto grant access, the
X.B xhost
Xcommand may fail silently.
X.PP
XIf
X.B rx
Xtries to send to large a command to the remote machine, it will
Xlikely fail with a parse error from csh.  If this happens, you
Xwill probably have to reduce the size of the exported environment.
END_OF_FILE
if test 3551 -ne `wc -c <'rx.man'`; then
    echo shar: \"'rx.man'\" unpacked with wrong size!
fi
# end of 'rx.man'
fi
if test -f 'rx.pl' -a "${1}" != "-c" ; then 
  echo shar: Will not clobber existing file \"'rx.pl'\"
else
echo shar: Extracting \"'rx.pl'\" \(9028 characters\)
sed "s/^X//" >'rx.pl' <<'END_OF_FILE'
X#! /usr/local/bin/perl
X# CONFIG: change the line above to point to your copy of perl.
X##############################################################################
X# Glasgow RX  version 3.1.7
X#
X# Copyright 1992 Duncan Sinclair 
X#
X# Last Modified:  Early April 1993.
X#
X# Distribution limited, as per the usual MIT copyright.
X##############################################################################
X# remote execution of X programs.  Based on a script in an old version of gwm.
X#
X# To install, put rx in your bin and make rxterm a link to it.
X#  Some configuration will be necessary, see "CONFIG" comments...
X#
X# More and more this is less and less like the original....
X#
X# Major hacked to work for our(my) set up, and also partly
X#  re-written to work with sh, rather than ksh.
X#
X# Maybe I'll turn this into our first zsh script!
X#
X# Looks like it turned into a perl script at some point - big improvement.
X##############################################################################
X# This code tries to be intelligent in the way it works.  This means there
X#  are tons of implicit assumptions about the environment it is run in.
X#  These assumptions are all valid on the machines I use, and in my
X#  environment.  At the same time, I try to make as few assumptions as possible
X#  about the remote machine.  Here's a list of all the more tricky ones...
X# *) That the remote machine has csh.  (Linux?)
X# *) That $RSHELL = /bin/(k)?sh ==> remote shell = /bin/(k)?sh.  (Make same.)
X# *) If remote shell = sh, that $PATH is compatible.  (Use csh, etc..)
X# *) I pass a cookie to the remote machine if need be, but does it
X#    know what to do with a cookie. (eat it?)
X# *) There must be others...
X##############################################################################
X# Why am I using csh to run the remote commands?  Simply because it doesn't
X#  interact badly with rsh, and hang waiting for a file descriptor to
X#  be closed.  I'd rather use zsh, or bash, or even perl, but they are not
X#  as universal as csh.
X##############################################################################
X#
Xrequire "stat.pl";
X#
X# What we called?
X#
X$argv0 = $0 ;
X$argv0 =~ s:.*/:: ;
X#
X# CONFIG:
X# Change these variables to be your domain name, and a pattern that
X#  will match all variations on your domain name.  You must include
X#  those leading dots!!! If your hostname includes your domain, see
X#  the code further down, marked "XXX"
X#
X$DOM  = ".dcs.gla.ac.uk" ;
X$DOMPAT = "\.dcs(\.gla(sgow)?(\.ac\.uk)?)?" ;
X#
X# CONFIG:
X# Change this to your value of BINDIR, or set the variable to "" if
X#  you think your users are smarter than that.
X#
X$XPATHS = "/usr/X11/bin" ;
X#
X# CONFIG:
X# Make this the name of your "remote shell" command.
X#
X$RSH = "rsh" ;
X#
X# end of CONFIG
X#
X# Some variables we'll no doubt use sometime...
X#
X$usage = "$argv0: usage: $argv0 [-l username] hostname [args...]\n" ;
X$RSHELL = (getpwuid($<))[8] || "/bin/sh" ;
X$HOME = $ENV{"HOME"} || (getpwuid($<))[7] ;
X$XAUTH = $ENV{"XAUTHORITY"} || $HOME . "/.Xauthority" ;
X$LOGF = "~/.rx.log" ;
X@STUFF = () ;
X$debug = 0 ;
X#
X# Before anything else, close stdin.  This might stop rx hanging
X#  due to rsh weirdness.
X#
Xclose(STDIN);
X#
X# do a "-l" flag...
X#
Xif ($ARGV[0] eq "-l") {
X  shift ;
X  $User = $ARGV[0] || die $usage ;
X  @LUser = ("-l",$User) ;
X  shift ;
X}
X#
X# Pick a host, any host...
X#
X$MACH = $ARGV[0] || die $usage ;
Xshift ;
X#
X# Things to think about for the remote machine.
X#
X$MACH =~ s/$DOMPAT// ;
X$OffSite = $MACH =~ /\./ ;
X#
X# Where am I?  Seems we can't trust the dumb user to set HOSTNAME right!
X#
X#$HOSTNAME=$ENV{HOSTNAME} || `hostname` ;		# Current Host
X$HOSTNAME=`hostname` ;					# Current Host
X$HOSTNAME =~ s/\n// ;
X#
X#  If all your hostnames include your domain, comment out the next line.
X#
Xif ( $OffSite ) { $HOSTNAME = $HOSTNAME . $DOM ; }	# XXX
X#
X# Now we know where we are, and they are, are they different?
X#
X$Diff = $HOSTNAME ne $MACH ;
X#
X# What is the display going to be?
X# !! Danger !! Heavy Regular expressions follow...
X# This needs to be re-written to be modular and can so be extended to
X#  support resetting host:* to unix:*, as required.
X#
X$DISPLAY = $ENV{"DISPLAY"} || ":0.0" ;
X$DISPLAY =~ s/$DOMPAT// ;
X$DISPLAY =~ s/^(unix)?(:\d(\.\d)?)$/$HOSTNAME$2/ if ($Diff) ;
X$DISPLAY =~ s/^([^.]*)(:\d(\.\d)?)$/$1$DOM$2/ if ($OffSite) ;
X$ENV{"DISPLAY"} = $DISPLAY ;
X#
X# Here comes the hard bit in sh.  Quote our args.
X# Also have to quote quotes.  To cope with csh braindamage,
X#  quotes are quoted thus; ' -> '\''
X# So for an arg "foo'bar", we get "'foo'\''bar'".
X#
Xforeach (@ARGV) {
X  s#\'#\'\\\'\'#g ;
X  s#(.*)#\'$1\'# ;
X}
X#
X# So what we doing?
X#
X  if ($argv0 eq "rx") { last PROG ; }
X  if ($argv0 eq "rxterm") {
X    #unshift(@ARGV,"-ls") if ($Diff) ;
X    unshift(@ARGV,"xterm","-ls","-n",$MACH) ;
X    last PROG ;
X  }
X  if ($argv0 =~ /r(.*)/) { unshift(@ARGV,$1) ; last PROG ; }
X  warn "$argv0: don't recognise my name." ;
X}
X#
X# If nothing else, become an rxterm.
X#
Xif (@ARGV == 0) {
X  #unshift(@ARGV,"-ls") if ($Diff) ;
X  unshift(@ARGV,"xterm","-ls","-n",$MACH) ;
X}
X#
X# Some special considerations if we are not ourselves on the other side.
X#
Xif ($OffSite || $User) {
X  #
X  # We want to pass a cookie here.
X  #
X  if (-e $XAUTH) {
X    #
X    # This is going to be unsecure, as the cookie will appear in a number
X    #  of command line args.  But at least it'll work.
X    # This will need enhanced if we ever fix the code above to
X    #  set DISPLAY to ":0.0", when we return to the server.
X    #
X    $CooKie = `PATH=\$PATH:$XPATHS xauth list $DISPLAY` ;
X    chop($CooKie) ;
X    @CooKs = split(' ',$CooKie) ;
X    shift(@CooKs) ;
X    unshift(@STUFF,"xauth","add",$DISPLAY,@CooKs,";") if (@CooKs == 2) ;
X  } else {
X    #
X    # Yuk.  What a crock.  I hate doing this.
X    #
X    system("xhost +$MACH >/dev/null 2>/dev/null") if ($Diff) ;
X  }
X  #
X  # We really only want to pass a value for $DISPLAY.
X  #
X  @VARS=("DISPLAY", split(' ',$ENV{"RXENV"})) ;
X} else {
X  #
X  # Some variables we wish to export
X  #
X  @VARS=(
X    "DISPLAY",
X    "XENVIRONMENT",
X    "XFILESEARCHPATH",
X    "XUSERFILESEARCHPATH",
X    "XAPPLRESDIR",
X    "OPENWINHOME",
X    "LD_LIBRARY_PATH",
X    # "MANPATH",		# for "rxman", and bourne shell users.
X    "XAUTHORITY",
X    split(' ',$ENV{"RXENV"}),
X    ) ;
X  #
X  # Braindead bourne shell, needs to be given a $PATH...
X  # We would rather not pass the current $PATH, because it might not work
X  #  on the destination machine.  I'd rather it was set by the user's
X  #  remote shell during the rsh.
X  # Fortunately, all *my* X programs are in an arch independant place, and
X  #  so it shouldn't cos a problem, locally.
X  # We check against $RSHELL, because they might be running another shell,
X  #  differant from their login shell.  I know, sounds weird, but it's too
X  #  common round here.
X  # I've also included ksh in the brain-damage, cos I can't see an easy way
X  #  to pass throught $ENV{"ENV"} without it being too late. (We only have
X  #  one person who has ksh as a login shell anyway...)
X  # Oh, yeah.. we are assuming that if it's bourne shell here, then it's
X  #  bourne shell there.  Much more important than this is that it it ISNT
X  #  bourne shell here, it better not be bourne shell there.
X  #
X  if ($RSHELL =~ m#/(k)?sh#) { push(@VARS,"PATH"); }
X}
X#
X# Validate $PWD routine...
X#
Xsub validate_pwd {
X  local(@pwdstats, @dotstats);
X  local($pwd) = $_[0];
X
X  unless (defined($pwd))          { return undef; } ;
X  unless (@dotstats = stat("."))  { return undef; } ;
X  unless (@pwdstats = stat($pwd)) { return undef; } ;
X  if (($pwdstats[$ST_DEV] != $dotstats[$ST_DEV]) ||
X      ($pwdstats[$ST_INO] != $dotstats[$ST_INO])) { return undef; } ;
X  $pwd;
X}
X#
X# Try and find a nice, valid, pwd.
X#
X  if ($PWD = $ENV{"PWD"}) {
X    $FOOPWD = $PWD ;
X    $FOOPWD =~ s#(/tmp_mnt|/export)?/(.*)#/$2# ;
X    $PWD = &validate_pwd($FOOPWD) || &validate_pwd($PWD) ;
X  }; 
X  unless ($PWD) {
X    chop($PWD = `pwd`) ;
X    $FOOPWD = $PWD ;
X    $FOOPWD =~ s#(/tmp_mnt|/export)?/(.*)#/$2# ;
X    $PWD = &validate_pwd($FOOPWD) || &validate_pwd($PWD) || $HOME;
X  }
X}
X$PWD =~ s#(.*)#\'$1\'# ;
X#
X# Try to find somewhere nice to live on the other side.
X#
Xunless ($OffSite) {
X  unshift(@STUFF,"test","-d",$PWD,"&&","cd",$PWD,";");
X}
X#
X# Start building the full command.
X#
Xforeach $var (@VARS) {
X  ($val = $ENV{$var}) &&
X     unshift(@STUFF,"setenv","$var","\'"."$val"."\'",";") ;
X}
X#
X# Some commands to do on the other side...
X#
Xunshift(@STUFF,"set","nonomatch",";");	# only if we are using csh.
X#
X# Build the remote command.
X#
X$REMOTE=("(umask 077 ; ((".join(" ",@STUFF,@ARGV).")&$LOGF &))") ;
X$REMOTE =~ s#\"#\\\"#g ;
X$REMOTE = "\"" . $REMOTE . "\"" ;
X#
X# Build the arg list for the exec.
X#
X@COMM=($RSH,@LUser,"$MACH","csh","-fc",$REMOTE) ;
X#
X# Do it!
X#
Xif ($debug) {
X  print "@COMM\n" ;
X} else {
X  exec @COMM ;
X}
X#
X# Rsh doesn't return any indication of how it went over
X# on the other side, but that's OK, cos we aint going to
X# wait around to see what happened.
X#
Xexit 0 ;
X#
X# tHe ENd
END_OF_FILE
if test 9028 -ne `wc -c <'rx.pl'`; then
    echo shar: \"'rx.pl'\" unpacked with wrong size!
fi
chmod +x 'rx.pl'
# end of 'rx.pl'
fi
echo shar: End of archive 1 \(of 1\).
cp /dev/null ark1isdone
MISSING=""
for I in 1 ; do
    if test ! -f ark${I}isdone ; then
	MISSING="${MISSING} ${I}"
    fi
done
if test "${MISSING}" = "" ; then
    echo You have the archive.
    rm -f ark[1-9]isdone
else
    echo You still need to unpack the following archives:
    echo "        " ${MISSING}
fi
##  End of shell archive.
exit 0


-- 
    Duncan Sinclair  |  sinclair@dcs.gla.ac.uk  |  sinclair@uk.ac.gla.dcs
      ---  Would the *real* UNIX Operating System please stand up.  ---

File 40/1144: Space FAQ 05/15 - References (74.4%)



REFERENCES ON SPECIFIC AREAS

    PUBLISHERS OF SPACE/ASTRONOMY MATERIAL

    Astronomical Society of the Pacific
    1290 24th Avenue
    San Francisco, CA 94122

	More expensive but better organized slide sets.

    Cambridge University Press
    32 East 57th Street
    New York, NY 10022

    Crawford-Peters Aeronautica
    P.O. Box 152528
    San Diego, CA 92115
    (619) 287-3933

	An excellent source of all kinds of space publications. They publish
	a number of catalogs, including:
	    Aviation and Space, 1945-1962
	    Aviation and Space, 1962-1990
	    Space and Related Titles

    European Southern Observatory
    Information and Photographic Service
    Dr R.M. West
    Karl Scharzschild Strasse 2
    D-8046 Garching bei Munchen
    FRG

	Slide sets, posters, photographs, conference proceedings.

    Finley Holiday Film Corporation
    12607 East Philadelphia Street
    Whittier, California 90601
    (213)945-3325
    (800)FILMS-07

	Wide selection of Apollo, Shuttle, Viking, and Voyager slides at ~50
	cents/slide. Call for a catalog.

    Hansen Planetarium (Utah)

	Said to hold sales on old slide sets. Look in Sky & Telescope
	for contact info.

    Lunar and Planetary Institute
    3303 NASA Road One
    Houston, TX 77058-4399

	Technical, geology-oriented slide sets, with supporting
	booklets.

    John Wiley & Sons
    605 Third Avenue
    New York, NY 10158-0012

    Sky Publishing Corporation
    PO Box 9111
    Belmont, MA  02178-9111

	Offers "Sky Catalogue 2000.0" on PC floppy with information
	(including parallax) for 45000 stars.

    Roger Wheate
    Geography Dept.
    University of Calgary, Alberta
    Canada T2N 1N4
    (403)-220-4892
    (403)-282-7298 (FAX)
    wheate@uncamult.bitnet

	Offers a 40-slide set called "Mapping the Planets" illustrating
	recent work in planetary cartography, comes with a booklet and
	information on getting your own copies of the maps. $50 Canadian,
	shipping included.

    Superintendent of Documents
    US Government Printing Office
    Washington, DC 20402

    Univelt, Inc.
    P. O. Box 28130
    San Diego, Ca. 92128

	Publishers for the American Astronomical Society.

    US Naval Observatory
	202-653-1079 (USNO Bulletin Board via modem)
	202-653-1507 General

    Willmann-Bell
    P.O. Box 35025
    Richmond, Virginia 23235 USA
    (804)-320-7016 9-5 EST M-F


    CAREERS IN THE SPACE INDUSTRY

    In 1990 the Princeton Planetary Society published the first edition of
    "Space Jobs: The Guide to Careers in Space-Related Fields." The
    publication was enormously successful: we distributed 2000 copies to
    space enthusiasts across the country and even sent a few to people in
    Great Britain, Australia, and Ecuador. Due to the tremendous response to
    the first edition, PPS has published an expanded, up-to-date second
    edition of the guide.

    The 40-page publication boasts 69 listings for summer and full-time job
    opportunities as well as graduate school programs. The second edition of
    "Space Jobs" features strategies for entering the space field and
    describes positions at consulting and engineering firms, NASA, and
    non-profit organizations. The expanded special section on graduate
    schools highlights a myriad of programs ranging from space manufacturing
    to space policy. Additional sections include tips on becoming an
    astronaut and listings of NASA Space Grant Fellowships and Consortia, as
    well as NASA Centers for the Commercial Development of Space.

    To order send check or money order made payable to Princeton Planetary
    Society for $4 per copy, plus $1 per copy for shipping and handling
    (non-US customers send an International Money Order payable in US
    dollars) to:

    Princeton Planetary Society
    315 West College
    Princeton University
    Princeton, NJ  08544


    DC-X SINGLE-STAGE TO ORBIT (SSTO) PROGRAM

    SDI's SSRT (Single Stage Rocket Technology) project has funded a
    suborbital technology demonstrator called DC-X that should fly in
    mid-1993. Further development towards an operational single-stage to
    orbit vehicle (called Delta Clipper) is uncertain at present.

    An collection of pictures and files relating to DC-X is available by
    anonymous FTP or email server in the directory

	bongo.cc.utexas.edu:pub/delta-clipper

    Chris W. Johnson (chrisj@emx.cc.utexas.edu) maintains the archive.


    HOW TO NAME A STAR AFTER A PERSON

    Official names are decided by committees of the International
    Astronomical Union, and are not for sale. There are purely commercial
    organizations which will, for a fee, send you pretty certificates and
    star maps describing where to find "your" star. These organizations have
    absolutely no standing in the astronomical community and the names they
    assign are not used by anyone else. It's also likely that you won't be
    able to see "your" star without binoculars or a telescope. See the back
    pages of Astronomy or other amateur astronomy publications for contact
    info; one such organization may be found at:

	International Star Registry
	34523 Wilson Road
	Ingleside, IL 60041

    This is not an endorsement of ISR.


    LLNL "GREAT EXPLORATION"

    The LLNL "Great Exploration", a plan for an on-the-cheap space station,
    Lunar base, and Mars mission using inflatable space structures, excited
    a lot of interest on the net and still comes up from time to time. Some
    references cited during net discussion were:

	Avation Week Jan 22, 1990 for an article on the overall Great
	Exploration

	NASA Assessment of the LLNL Space Exploration Proposal and LLNL
	Responses by Dr. Lowell Wood LLNL Doc. No. SS 90-9. Their address
	is: PO Box 808 Livermore, CA 94550 (the NASA authors are unknown).

	Briefing slides of a presentation to the NRC last December may be
	available. Write LLNL and ask.

	Conceptual Design Study for Modular Inflatable Space Structures, a
	final report for purchase order B098747 by ILC Dover INC. I don't
	know how to get this except from LLNL or ILC Dover. I don't have an
	address for ILC.


    LUNAR PROSPECTOR

    Lunar Exploration Inc. (LEI) is a non-profit corporation working on a
    privately funded lunar polar orbiter. Lunar Prospector is designed to
    perform a geochemical survey and search for frozen volatiles at the
    poles. A set of reference files describing the project is available in

	ames.arc.nasa.gov:pub/SPACE/LEI/*


    LUNAR SCIENCE AND ACTIVITIES

    Grant H Heiken, David T Vaniman, and Bevan M French (editors), "Lunar
    Sourcebook, A User's Guide to the Moon", Cambridge University Press
    1991, ISBN 0-521-33444-6; hardcover; expensive. A one-volume
    encyclopedia of essentially everything known about the Moon, reviewing
    current knowledge in considerable depth, with copious references. Heavy
    emphasis on geology, but a lot more besides, including considerable
    discussion of past lunar missions and practical issues relevant to
    future mission design. *The* reference book for the Moon; all others are
    obsolete.

    Wendell Mendell (ed), "Lunar Bases and Space Activities of the 21st
    Century", $15. "Every serious student of lunar bases *must* have this
    book" - Bill Higgins. Available from:

	Lunar and Planetary Institute
	3303 NASA Road One
	Houston, TX 77058-4399
	If you want to order books, call (713)486-2172.

    Thomas A. Mutch, "Geology of the Moon: A Stratigraphic View", Princeton
    University Press, 1970. Information about the Lunar Orbiter missions,
    including maps of the coverage of the lunar nearside and farside by
    various Orbiters.


    ORBITING EARTH SATELLITE HISTORIES

    A list of Earth orbiting satellites (that are still in orbit) is
    available by anonymous FTP in:

	ames.arc.nasa.gov:pub/SPACE/FAQ/Satellites


    SPACECRAFT MODELS

    "Space in Miniature #2: Gemini" by
	Michael J. Mackowski
	1621 Waterwood Lane, St. Louis, MO 63146
	$7.50

    Only 34pp but enough pictures & diagrams to interest more than just the
    modelling community, I feel.

    Marco's Miniatures of Dracut, Mass. have produced a 1/144 Skylab in an
    edition of 500 & a 1/48 Lunar Rover (same scale as Monogram and Revell
    Lunar Modules) in a similar edition. Prices are $45 for Skylab, $24 for
    LRV. Check with them for postage etc. I have no connection with them,
    but have found their service to be good and their stock of rare/old kits
    *is* impressive. Prices range from reasonable ($35 for Monogram 1/32
    scale Apollo CSM with cutaway details) to spectacular ($145 for Airfix
    Vostok).

	 Four Star Collectibles
	 P.O. Box 658
	 Dracut Mass 01826, USA.
	 (508)-957-0695.

    Voyager, HST, Viking, Lunar Rover etc. kits from:

	Lunar Models
	5120 Grisham
	Rowlett, Texas 75088
	(214)-475-4230

    As reviewed by Bob Kaplow:

	Peter Alway's book "Scale Model Rocketry" is now available. Mine
	arrived in the mail earlier this week. To get your own copy, send
	$19.95 + $2.50 s/h ($22.45 total) to:

			Peter Alway
			2830 Pittsfield
			Ann Arbor, MI 48104

	The book includes information on collecting scale data, construction
	of scale models, and several handy tables. Appendicies include plans
	for 3 sport scale models, a 1:9.22 D Region Tomahawk (BT50), a 1/40
	V-2 (BT60), and a 1/9.16 Aerobee 150A (BT55/60).

	I've only begun to study the book, but it certainly will be a
	valuable data source for many modellers. Most vehicles include
	several paragraphs of text describing the missions flown by the
	rocket, various specs including "NAR" engine classification, along
	with a dimensioned drawing, color layouts & paint pattern, and a
	black & white photograph.

	The vehicles included are the Aerobee 150A, Aerobee 300, Aerobee Hi,
	Arcas, Asp, Astrobee 1500, Astrobee D, Atlas Centaur, Atlas-Agena,
	Atlas-Score, Baby WAC, D-Region Tomahawk, Deacon Rockoon, Delta B,
	Delta E, Gemini-Titan II, Iris, Javelin, Juno 1, Juno 2, Little Joe
	1, Little Joe 2, Mercury-Atlas, Mercury-Redstone, Nike-Apache,
	Nike-Asp, Nike-Cajun, Nike-Deacon, Nike-Tomahawk, RAM B, Saturn 1
	Block 1, Saturn 1 Block 2, Saturn 1B, Saturn 5, Scout, Standard
	Aerobee, Terrapin, Thor-Able, Titan III C, Titan III E, Trailblazer
	1, V-2, Vanguard, Viking Model 1, Viking Model 2, and Wac Corporal.


    ROCKET PROPULSION

	George P. Sutton, "Rocket Propulsion Elements", 5th edn,
	Wiley-Interscience 1986, ISBN 0-471-80027-9. Pricey textbook. The
	best (nearly the only) modern introduction to the technical side of
	rocketry. A good place to start if you want to know the details. Not
	for the math-shy. Straight chemical rockets, essentially nothing on
	more advanced propulsion (although earlier editions reportedly had
	some coverage).

	Dieter K. Huzel and David H. Huang, "Design of Liquid Propellant
	Rocket Engines", NASA SP-125.
	NTIS N71-29405		PC A20/MF A01	1971  461p
	Out of print; reproductions may be obtained through the NTIS
	(expensive). The complete and authoritative guide to designing
	liquid-fuel engines. Reference #1 in most chapters of Sutton. Heavy
	emphasis on practical issues, what works and what doesn't, what the
	typical values of the fudge factors are. Stiff reading, massive
	detail; written for rocket engineers by rocket engineers.


    SPACECRAFT DESIGN

	Brij N. Agrawal, "Design of Geosynchronous Spacecraft",
	Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-200114-4.

	James R. Wertz ed, "Spacecraft Attitude Determination and
	Control", Kluwer, ISBN 90-277-1204-2.

	P.R.K. Chetty, "Satellite Technology and its Applications",
	McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0-8306-9688-1.

	James R. Wertz and Wiley J. Larson (editors), "Space Mission
	Analysis and Design", Kluwer Academic Publishers
	(Dordrecht/Boston/London) 1991, ISBN 0-7923-0971-5 (paperback), or
	0-7923-0970-7 (hardback).

	    This looks at system-level design of a spacecraft, rather than
	    detailed design. 23 chapters, 4 appendices, about 430 pages. It
	    leads the reader through the mission design and system-level
	    design of a fictitious earth-observation satellite, to
	    illustrate the principles that it tries to convey. Warning:
	    although the book is chock-full of many useful reference tables,
	    some of the numbers in at least one of those tables (launch
	    costs for various launchers) appear to be quite wrong. Can be
	    ordered by telephone, using a credit card; Kluwer's phone number
	    is (617)-871-6600. Cost $34.50.


    ESOTERIC PROPULSION SCHEMES (SOLAR SAILS, LASERS, FUSION...)

    This needs more and more up-to-date references, but it's a start.

    ANTIMATTER:

	"Antiproton Annihilation Propulsion", Robert Forward
	    AFRPL TR-85-034 from the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory
	    (AFRPL/XRX, Stop 24, Edwards Air Force Base, CA 93523-5000).
	    NTIS AD-A160 734/0	   PC A10/MF A01
	    PC => Paper copy, A10 => $US57.90 -- or maybe Price Code?
	    MF => MicroFiche, A01 => $US13.90

	    Technical study on making, holding, and using antimatter for
	    near-term (30-50 years) propulsion systems. Excellent
	    bibliography. Forward is the best-known proponent
	    of antimatter.

	    This also may be available as UDR-TR-85-55 from the contractor,
	    the University of Dayton Research Institute, and DTIC AD-A160
	    from the Defense Technical Information Center, Defense Logistics
	    Agency, Cameron Station, Alexandria, VA 22304-6145. And it's
	    also available from the NTIS, with yet another number.

	"Advanced Space Propulsion Study, Antiproton and Beamed Power
	    Propulsion", Robert Forward

	    AFAL TR-87-070 from the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, DTIC
	    #AD-A189 218.
	    NTIS AD-A189 218/1	  PC A10/MF A01

	    Summarizes the previous paper, goes into detail on beamed power
	    systems including " 1) pellet, microwave, and laser beamed power
	    systems for intersteller transport; 2) a design for a
	    near-relativistic laser-pushed lightsail using near-term laser
	    technology; 3) a survey of laser thermal propulsion, tether
	    transportation systems, antiproton annihilation propulsion,
	    exotic applications of solar sails, and laser-pushed
	    interstellar lightsails; 4) the status of antiproton
	    annihilation propulsion as of 1986; and 5) the prospects for
	    obtaining antimatter ions heavier than antiprotons." Again,
	    there is an extensive bibliography.

	    "Application of Antimatter - Electric Power to Interstellar
	    Propulsion", G. D. Nordley, JBIS Interstellar Studies issue of
	    6/90.

    BUSSARD RAMJETS AND RELATED METHODS:

	G. L. Matloff and A. J. Fennelly, "Interstellar Applications and
	Limitations of Several Electrostatic/Electromagnetic Ion Collection
	Techniques", JBIS 30 (1977):213-222

	N. H. Langston, "The Erosion of Interstellar Drag Screens", JBIS 26
	(1973): 481-484

	C. Powell, "Flight Dynamics of the Ram-Augmented Interstellar
	Rocket", JBIS 28 (1975):553-562

	A. R. Martin, "The Effects of Drag on Relativistic Spacefight", JBIS
	25 (1972):643-652

    FUSION:

	"A Laser Fusion Rocket for Interplanetary Propulsion", Roderick Hyde,
	LLNL report UCRL-88857. (Contact the Technical Information Dept. at
	Livermore)

	    Fusion Pellet design: Fuel selection. Energy loss mechanisms.
	    Pellet compression metrics. Thrust Chamber: Magnetic nozzle.
	    Shielding. Tritium breeding. Thermal modeling. Fusion Driver
	    (lasers, particle beams, etc): Heat rejection. Vehicle Summary:
	    Mass estimates. Vehicle Performance: Interstellar travel
	    required exhaust velocities at the limit of fusion's capability.
	    Interplanetary missions are limited by power/weight ratio.
	    Trajectory modeling. Typical mission profiles. References,
	    including the 1978 report in JBIS, "Project Daedalus", and
	    several on ICF and driver technology.

	"Fusion as Electric Propulsion", Robert W. Bussard, Journal of
	Propulsion and Power, Vol. 6, No. 5, Sept.-Oct. 1990

	    Fusion rocket engines are analyzed as electric propulsion
	    systems, with propulsion thrust-power-input-power ratio (the
	    thrust-power "gain" G(t)) much greater than unity. Gain values
	    of conventional (solar, fission) electric propulsion systems are
	    always quite small (e.g., G(t)<0.8). With these, "high-thrust"
	    interplanetary flight is not possible, because system
	    acceleration (a(t)) capabilities are always less than the local
	    gravitational acceleration. In contrast, gain values 50-100
	    times higher are found for some fusion concepts, which offer
	    "high-thrust" flight capability. One performance example shows a
	    53.3 day (34.4 powered; 18.9 coast), one-way transit time with
	    19% payload for a single-stage Earth/Mars vehicle. Another shows
	    the potential for high acceleration (a(t)=0.55g(o)) flight in
	    Earth/moon space.

	"The QED Engine System: Direct Electric Fusion-Powered Systems for
	Aerospace Flight Propulsion" by Robert W. Bussard, EMC2-1190-03,
	available from Energy/Matter Conversion Corp., 9100 A. Center
	Street, Manassas, VA 22110.

	    [This is an introduction to the application of Bussard's version
	    of the Farnsworth/Hirsch electrostatic confinement fusion
	    technology to propulsion. 1500applications would be at hand. The PLASMAKtm
	    innovation will make this possible; its unique pressure
	    efficient structure, exceptional stability, fluid-mechanically
	    compressible Mantle and direct inductive MHD electric power
	    conversion advantages are described. Peak burn densities of tens
	    of megawats per cc give it compactness even in the
	    multi-gigawatt electric output size. Engineering advantages
	    indicate a rapid development schedule at very modest cost. [I
	    strongly recommend that people take this guy seriously. Bob
	    Hirsch, the primary proponent of the Tokamak, has recently
	    declared Koloc's PLASMAKtm precursor, the spheromak, to be one
	    of 3 promising fusion technologies that should be pursued rather
	    than Tokamak. Aside from the preceeding appeal to authority, the
	    PLASMAKtm looks like it finally models ball-lightning with solid
	    MHD physics. -- Jim Bowery]

    ION DRIVES:

	Retrieve files pub/SPACE/SPACELINK/6.5.2.* from the Ames SPACE
	archive; these deal with many aspects of ion drives and describe the
	SERT I and II missions, which flight-tested cesium ion thrusters in
	the 1960s and 70s. There are numerous references.

    MASS DRIVERS (COILGUNS, RAILGUNS):

	IEEE Transactions on Magnetics (for example, v. 27 no. 1, January
	1991 issue). Every so often they publish the proceedings of the
	Symposium on Electromagnetic Launcher Technology, including hundreds
	of papers on the subject. It's a good look at the state of the art,
	though perhaps not a good tutorial for beginners. Anybody know some
	good review papers?

    NUCLEAR ROCKETS (FISSION):

	"Technical Notes on Nuclear Rockets", by Bruce W. Knight and Donald
	Kingsbury, unpublished. May be available from: Donald Kingsbury,
	Math Dept., McGill University, PO Box 6070, Station A, Montreal,
	Quebec M3C 3G1 Canada.

    SOLAR SAILS:

	Starsailing. Solar Sails and Interstellar Travel. Louis Friedman,
	Wiley, New York, 1988, 146 pp., paper $9.95. (Not very technical,
	but an adequate overview.)

	"Roundtrip Interstellar Travel Using Laser-Pushed Lightsails
	(Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, vol. 21, pp. 187-95, Jan.-Feb.
	1984)

    TETHERS:

	_Tethers and Asteroids for Artificial Gravity Assist in the Solar
	System,_ by P.A. Penzo and H.L. Mayer., _Journal of Spacecraft
	and Rockets_ for Jan-Feb 1986.

	    Details how a spacecraft with a kevlar tether of the same mass
	    can change its velocity by up to slightly less than 1 km/sec. if
	    it is travelling under that velocity wrt a suitable asteroid.

    GENERAL:

	"Alternate Propulsion Energy Sources", Robert Forward
	    AFPRL TR-83-067.
	    NTIS AD-B088 771/1	  PC A07/MF A01   Dec 83 138p

	    Keywords: Propulsion energy, metastable helium, free-radical
	    hydrogen, solar pumped (sic) plasmas, antiproton annihiliation,
	    ionospheric lasers, solar sails, perforated sails, microwave
	    sails, quantum fluctuations, antimatter rockets... It's a wide,
	    if not deep, look at exotic energy sources which might be useful
	    for space propulsion. It also considers various kinds of laser
	    propulsion, metallic hydrogen, tethers, and unconventional
	    nuclear propulsion. The bibliographic information, pointing to
	    the research on all this stuff, belongs on every daydreamer's
	    shelf.

	Future Magic. Dr. Robert L. Forward, Avon, 1988. ISBN 0-380-89814-4.

	    Nontechnical discussion of tethers, antimatter, gravity control,
	    and even futher-out topics.


    SPY SATELLITES

    *Deep Black*, by William Burrows;
	"best modern general book for spysats."

    1) A Base For Debate: The US Satellite Station at Nurrungar, Des Ball,
    Allen and Unwin Australia, 1987 ISBN 0 04 355027 4 [ covers DSP early
    warning satellites]

    2) Pine Gap: Australia and the US Geostationary Signals intelligence
    satellite program, Des Ball, Allen and Unwin Australia, 1988 ISBN 0 04
    363002 5. [covers RHYOLITE/AQUACADE, CHALET/VORTEX, and MAGNUM signals
    intelligence satellites]

    3) Guardians: Strategic Reconnaissance Satellites, Curtis Peebles, 1987,
    Ian Allan, ISBN 0 7110 17654 [ good on MOL, military Salyut and Soviet
    satellites, less so on others. Tends to believe what he's told so flaws
    in discussion of DSP, RHYOLITE et al..]

    4) America's Secret Eyes In Space: The Keyhole Spy Satellite Program,
    Jeffrey Richelson, 1990, Harper and Row, ISBN 0 88730 285 8 [ in a class
    of its own, *the* historical reference on the KEYHOLE satellites]

    5) Secret Sentries in Space, Philip J Klass, 1971.
	"long out of print but well worth a look"


    SPACE SHUTTLE COMPUTER SYSTEMS

    %J Communications of the ACM
    %V 27
    %N 9
    %D September 1984
    %K Special issue on space [shuttle] computers

    %A Myron Kayton
    %T Avionics for Manned Spacecraft
    %J IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems
    %V 25
    %N 6
    %D November 1989
    %P 786-827

    Other various AIAA and IEEE publications.

    Computers in Spaceflight: The NASA Experience
    James E.  Tomayko
    1988?


    SETI COMPUTATION (SIGNAL PROCESSING)

    %A D. K. Cullers
    %A Ivan R. Linscott
    %A Bernard M. Oliver
    %T Signal Processing in SETI
    %J Communications of the ACM
    %V 28
    %N 11
    %D November 1984
    %P 1151-1163
    %K CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: D.4.1 [Operating Systems]:
    Process Management - concurrency; I.5.4 [Pattern Recognition]:
    Applications - signal processing; J.2 [Phsyical Sciences and Engineering]:
    astronomy
    General Terms: Design
    Additional Key Words and Phrases: digital Fourier transforms,
    finite impulse-response filters, interstellar communications,
    Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence, signal detection,
    spectrum analysis


    AMATEUR SATELLIES & WEATHER SATELLITES

    A fairly long writeup on receiving and interpreting weather satellite
    photos is available from the Ames SPACE archive in
    pub/SPACE/FAQ/WeatherPhotos.

    The American Radio Relay League publication service offers the following
    references (also see the section on AMSAT in the space groups segment of
    the FAQ):

	ARRL Satellite Experimenters Handbook,		#3185, $20
	ARRL Weather Satellite Handbook,		#3193, $20
	IBM-PC software for Weather Satellite Handbook, #3290, $10

	AMSAT NA 5th Space Symposium,			#0739, $12
	AMSAT NA 6th Space Symposium,			#2219, $12

	Shipping is extra.

    The American Radio Relay League
    Publications Department
    225 Main Street
    Newington, CT 06111
    (203)-666-1541


    TIDES

    Srinivas Bettadpur contributed a writeup on tides, available from the
    Ames SPACE archive in pub/SPACE/FAQ/Tides. It covers the following
    areas:

	- 2-D Example of Tidal Deformation
	- Treatment of Tidal Fields in Practice
	- Long term evolution of the Earth-Moon system under tides

    The writeup refers to the following texts:

	"Geophysical Geodesy" by K. Lambeck
	"Tides of the planet Earth" by P. Melchior

File 41/1144: rec.sport.hockey Frequently Asked Questions (70.0%)



rec.sport.hockey answers to Frequently Asked Questions and other news:
 

0. New Info.
1. NHL
2. NHL Minor Leagues
3. College Hockey (North America)
4. Other leagues (e.g. Europe, Canada Cup tournament)
5. E-mail files
6. USENET Hockey Pool
7. Up-coming Dates
8. Answers to some frequently asked questions
9. Miscellaneous
 
 Send comments, suggestions and criticisms regarding this FAQ list via e-
mail to hamlet@u.washington.edu.
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 0. New Info.
 
 This section will describe additions since the last post so that you can 
decide if there is anything worth reading. Paragraphs containing new 
information will be preceded by two asterisks (**).

 1.: New Anaheim contact, Winnipeg to keep affiliate in Moncton.
 2.: New Milwaukee contact, IHL broadcaster of the year named, Rheaume to 
start against Cyclones, San Diego sets record.
 3.: Ticket info included for 1994 NCAA Division I Championships.
 4.: World Championship Pool B results listed, Sweden Hockey Games final 
standings listed, Swedish Elite League final standings listed, new Olypmic 
Hockey mailing list.
 5.: New Montreal mailing list address.
 6.: 
 7.: 
 8.: 
 9.: 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
  1. NHL - National Hockey League
 
 For detailed information concerning a team (particularly where to get 
tickets and merchandise, where to watch games in town....), send e-mail to 
the net contact(s) for the team.

                             First   # of   Last
 Team                   Div  Season  Cups   Cup    Net Contacts
 ---------------------  ---  ------  ----  ------ ----------------------
**
 Anaheim Mighty Ducks    -   93-94      -    -    Kris Myers
                                                  kris@fs2.assist.uci.edu
 Boston Bruins           A   24-25      5  71-72  
 Buffalo Sabres          A   70-71      0    -    Jeff Horvath
                                                  jhorvath@macc.wisc.edu
 Calgary Flames          S   80-81*     1  88-89  CALDWELL8102@mtroyal.ab.ca
 Chicago Blackhawks      N   26-27      3  60-61  John Scholvin
                                                  scholvin@casbah.acns.nwu.edu
 Detroit Red Wings       N   33-34*     7  54-55  SGLENN@cmsa.gmr.com
 Edmonton Oilers         S   79-80*     5  89-90  Andrew Scott
                                                  andrew@idacom.hp.com
 Hartford Whalers        A   79-80*     0    -    Matthew Olsen
                                                  dmolsen@athena.mit.edu
 Los Angeles Kings       S   67-68      0    -    Stan Willis
                                                  willis@empire.dnet.hac.com
 Minnesota North Stars   N   67-68*     0    -    Mitch McGowan
                                                  hamlet@u.washington.edu
 Montreal Canadiens      A   17-18     22  85-86  
 New Jersey Devils       P   82-83*     0    -    
 New York Islanders      P   72-73      4  82-83  Mark Anania
                                                  ananim@rpi.edu
 New York Rangers        P   26-27      3  39-40  Paul Romano
                                                  romano@monolith.bellcore.com
 Ottawa Senators         A   92-93      0    -    Scott Simpson
                                                  simpson@bnr.ca
 Philadelphia Flyers     P   67-68      2  74-75  Pete Clark
                                                  seth@hos1cad.att.com
 Pittsburgh Penguins     P   67-68      2  91-92  Lori Iannamico
                                                  lli+@cs.cmu.edu
                                                  Thomas Sullivan
                                                  tms@cs.cmu.edu
 Quebec Nordiques        A   79-80*     0    -
 St. Louis Blues         N   67-68      0    -    Joseph Achkar
                                                  jca2@cec1.wustl.edu
 San Jose Sharks         S   91-92      0    -    Nelson Lu
                                                  claudius@leland.stanford.edu
**
 South Florida           -   93-94      -    -    
 Tampa Bay Lightning     N   92-93      0    -    Tom Wilson
                                                  wilson@eola.cs.ucf.edu
 Toronto Maple Leafs     N   26-27*    11  66-67  Darryl Gamble
                                                  darryl@cs.yorku.ca
 Vancouver Canucks       S   70-71      0    -    Alan Chim
                                                  chim@sfu.ca
 Washington Capitals     P   74-75      0    -    David Lu
                                                  david@eng.umd.edu
 Winnipeg Jets           S   79-80*     0    -    umturne4@ccu.umanitoba.ca
 
 A=Adams N=Norris P=Patrick S=Smythe
 
 *Calgary: formerly Atlanta Flames (72/73-79/80)
  Detroit: formerly Detroit Cougars (26/27-29/30) -> Detroit Falcons 
(30/31-32/33)
  Edmonton: formerly Alberta Oilers (WHA) (72/73) -> Edmonton Oilers (WHA) 
(72/73-78/79)
  Hartford: formerly New England Whalers (WHA) (72/73-78/79)
  Minnesota: Cleveland Barons were merged with Minnesota for the 1978/79 
season.
  New Jersey: formerly Kansas City Scouts (74/75-75/76) -> Colorado 
Rockies (76/77-81/82)
  Quebec: formerly Quebec Nordiques (WHA) (72/73-78/79)
  Toronto: formerly Toronto Arenas (17/18-18/19) -> Toronto St. Patricks 
(19/20-25/26)
  Winnipeg: formerly Winnipeg Jets (WHA) (72/73-78/79)

 Teams with mailing lists, see section 5 for addresses: Boston, Buffalo, 
Los Angeles, Montreal, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Jose, 
Tampa Bay, Vancouver, Washington.

-----
 
- Schedule

 1992-1993 Schedule for the NHL

                                 April
    Sun       Mon       Tue       Wed       Thu       Fri       Sat
+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
!         !         !         !         ! 1       ! 2       ! 3       !
!         !         !         !         !Min @ Cal!Mon @ Was!Buf @ Bos!
!         !         !         !         !Det @ Chi!NYI @ NYR!Cal @ SJ !
!         !         !         !         !Har @ Pit!         !Chi @ StL!
!         !         !         !         !Que @ Ott!         !Van @ Det!
!         !         !         !         !Tor @ Phi!         !Win @ Edm!
!         !         !         !         !Win @ SJ !         !Ott @ Har!
!         !         !         !         !Van @ TB !         !Min @ LA !
!         !         !         !         !         !         !Mon @ NYI!
!         !         !         !         !         !         !NJ  @ Tor!
!         !         !         !         !         !         !TB  @ Phi!
!         !         !         !         !         !         !Pit @ Que!
+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
! 4       ! 5       ! 6       ! 7       ! 8       ! 9       !10       !
!Bos @ Buf!Har @ NYR!Bos @ Que!Edm @ Van!Que @ Bos!Van @ Cal!Bos @ Mon!
!Cal @ SJ !         !Buf @ Min!Har @ Ott!Chi @ NYI!Pit @ NYR!Buf @ Det!
!StL @ Chi!         !Cal @ LA !Mon @ Pit!Det @ TB !         !Chi @ TB !
!Pit @ NJ !         !Edm @ SJ !NYR @ NJ !SJ  @ LA !         !Har @ Que!
!NYR @ Was!         !NYI @ Was!         !Was @ Phi!         !LA  @ SJ !
!Van @ Ott!         !Phi @ Win!         !Tor @ Win!         !StL @ Min!
!         !         !StL @ TB !         !         !         !NJ  @ Was!
!         !         !         !         !         !         !Ott @ NYI!
!         !         !         !         !         !         !NYR @ Pit!
!         !         !         !         !         !         !Phi @ Tor!
+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
!11       !12       !13       !14       !15       !16       !17       !
!Ott @ Bos!Was @ Mon!Mon @ Buf!Bos @ Ott!Phi @ Buf!         !         !
!Que @ Buf!NYR @ Phi!Cal @ Edm!NYI @ Har!SJ  @ Cal!         !         !
!Cal @ Van!         !Chi @ Min!Pit @ NJ !Tor @ Chi!         !         !
!TB  @ Chi!         !LA  @ Van!Was @ NYR!Min @ Det!         !         !
!Win @ Edm!         !Ott @ Que!         !Edm @ Win!         !         !
!Tor @ Har!         !StL @ Tor!         !Har @ NYI!         !         !
!Min @ StL!         !TB  @ Win!         !Van @ LA !         !         !
!NYI @ NJ !         !         !         !NJ  @ Pit!         !         !
!         !         !         !         !TB  @ StL!         !         !
+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+

 The season will begin on 10/6 and end on 4/15. Playoffs will begin on 
4/18 and end on or before 6/14. 24 NHL regular season games will be played 
in non-NHL cities during 92-93 season. Cities: Milwaukee (2), Sacramento 
(2), Cleveland (2), Indianapolis, Phoenix, Miami, Oklahoma City, Dallas, 
Atlanta, Cincinnati, Providence, Peoria, Hamilton (4), Saskatoon (4), 
Halifax.

 Here is a chart showing the number of games between the teams (84 games 
each):

      N N N P P W   B B H M O Q   C D M S T T   C E L S V W
      J Y Y h i a   o u a o t u   h e i t B o   a d A J a i
        I R i t s   s f r n t e   i t n L   r   l m     n n
      = = = = = =   = = = = = =   = = = = = =   = = = = = =
 NJ : - 7 7 7 9 7   4 4 4 3 4 4   2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 2 2 2 2
 NYI: 7 - 7 9 7 7   4 3 4 4 3 3   2 2 2 3 2 2   2 3 2 2 2 2
 NYR: 7 7 - 7 7 9   3 4 3 4 3 4   2 2 2 2 3 2   2 2 2 3 2 2
 Phi: 7 9 7 - 7 7   4 3 3 4 3 4   2 3 2 2 2 2   3 2 2 2 2 2
 Pit: 9 7 7 7 - 7   5 4 3 3 4 3   2 2 2 2 2 2   2 3 2 2 2 2
 Was: 7 7 9 7 7 -   3 4 4 3 4 3   3 3 2 2 2 2   2 2 2 2 2 2

 Bos: 4 4 3 4 5 3   - 7 7 9 7 7   2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 2 2 2 2
 Buf: 4 3 4 3 4 4   7 - 9 7 7 7   2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 2 2 3 2
 Har: 4 4 3 3 3 4   7 9 - 7 7 7   2 2 2 3 2 2   2 2 2 2 2 3
 Mon: 3 4 4 4 3 3   9 7 7 - 7 7   2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 3 3 2 2
 Ott: 4 3 3 3 4 4   7 7 7 7 - 9   2 2 2 2 2 3   2 2 2 2 2 3
 Que: 4 3 4 4 3 3   7 7 7 7 9 -   2 2 2 2 3 3   2 2 2 2 2 2

 Chi: 2 2 2 2 2 3   2 2 2 2 2 2   - 9 7 7 7 7   3 4 5 3 4 3
 Det: 2 2 2 3 2 3   2 2 2 2 2 2   9 - 7 7 7 7   4 3 4 4 3 3
 Min: 2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 2 2 2 2   7 7 - 9 7 7   4 4 3 3 5 4
 StL: 2 3 2 2 2 2   2 2 3 2 2 2   7 7 9 - 7 7   4 3 3 3 4 4
 TB : 2 2 3 2 2 2   2 2 2 2 2 3   7 7 7 7 - 9   3 4 3 4 3 4
 Tor: 2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 2 2 3 3   7 7 7 7 9 -   4 3 4 4 3 3

 Cal: 2 2 2 3 2 2   2 2 2 2 2 2   3 4 4 4 3 4   - 7 7 9 7 7
 Edm: 2 3 2 2 3 2   2 2 2 2 2 2   4 3 4 3 4 3   7 - 7 7 7 9
 LA : 2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 2 3 2 2   5 4 3 3 3 4   7 7 - 7 9 7
 SJ : 2 2 3 2 2 2   2 2 2 3 2 2   3 4 3 3 4 4   9 7 7 - 7 7
 Van: 2 2 2 2 2 2   2 3 2 2 2 2   4 3 5 4 3 3   7 7 9 7 - 7
 Win: 2 2 2 2 2 2   2 2 3 2 3 2   3 3 4 4 4 3   7 9 7 7 7 -

 Valerie Hammerl  has posted this year's version 
of nhl.c, a schedule program for NHL games.  For example, users can find 
out the games played on a certain date or find out the next ten games 
played by team x. A copy can be obtained by e-mailing 


 Following is the neutral site schedule:

 Tue 10/13:  Calgary vs. Minnesota @ Saskatoon
 Tue 10/20:  Ottawa vs. Toronto @ Hamilton
 Tue 11/03:  Chicago vs. Washington @ Indianapolis
 Tue 11/17:  Toronto vs. Quebec @ Hamilton
 Wed 11/18:  Buffalo vs. New Jersey @ Hamilton
 Tue 12/01:  Los Angeles vs. Chicago @ Milwaukee
 Tue 12/08:  Montreal vs. Los Angeles @ Phoenix
 Wed 12/09:  Tampa Bay vs. New York Rangers @ Miami
 Sun 12/13:  Edmonton vs. New York Islanders @ Oklahoma City
 Tue 12/15:  New York Islanders vs. St. Louis @ Dallas
 Mon 01/04:  San Jose vs. Montreal @ Sacramento
 Mon 01/18:  Hartford vs. Winnipeg @ Saskatoon
 Mon 02/08:  Boston vs. Pittsburgh @ Atlanta
 Mon 02/08:  St. Louis vs. Hartford @ Peoria
 Tue 02/16:  Philadelphia vs. Calgary @ Cincinnati
 Sat 02/20:  Quebec vs. Tampa Bay @ Halifax
 Mon 02/22:  New York Rangers vs. San Jose @ Sacramento
 Mon 02/22:  Detroit vs. Philadelphia @ Cleveland
 Tue 02/23:  Winnipeg vs. Ottawa @ Saskatoon
 Mon 03/01:  Vancouver vs. Buffalo @ Hamilton
 Thu 03/11:  Minnesota vs. Vancouver @ Saskatoon
 Tue 03/16:  Washington vs. Detroit @ Milwaukee
 Tue 03/16:  New Jersey vs. Boston @ Providence  *
 Sun 03/21:  Pittsburgh vs. Edmonton @ Cleveland

 * Location subject to change

NHL Playoff Schedule:

Wales Conference Division Semifinals: April 18, 20, 22, 24, 26*, 28*, 30*
Campbell Conference Division Semifinals: April 19, 21, 23, 25, 27*, 29*, May 1*
Wales Conference Division Finals: May 2, 4, 6, 8, 10*, 12*, 14*
Campbell Conference Division Finals: May 3, 5, 7, 9, 11*, 13*, 15*
Wales Conference Final: May 16, 18, 20, 22, 24*, 26*, 28*
Campbell Conference Final: May 17, 19, 21, 23, 25*, 27*, 29*
Stanley Cup Final: June 1, 3, 5, 7, 9*, 11*, 14*

* - if neccessary

-----
 
- News & Scores
 
 SPIKE (bryan.k.strouse)  posts weekday news and 
box scores (Sunday through Thursday). John P. Curcio 
 posts weekend news and box scores. Both maintain 
e-mail lists for faster delivery.
 Net contacts post team news as they see/hear/read it.
 
-----
 
- Notable team news (transactions and announcements)
 
 Note that this information is culled from press releases and posts.  It 
is updated each month and only information currently under discussion or 
of continuing importance or interest will be listed for more than two 
postings.
 
 Boston Bruins
  Boston legislators and the developers proposing a new Boston Garden 
finally agreed to a deal that puts the 19,000-seat, $160 million project 
back on track to be finished in September 1995.
  Right wing Daniel Marois will be sidelined indefinitely following 
surgery to repair a herniated disc in his back.
**
  Sent defenseman Glen Murray to Providence of the American Hockey League.

 Buffalo Sabres
1-800-333-PUCK (1-800-333-7825)
  Acquired left winger Bob Errey from Pittsburgh for defenseman Mike 
Ramsey.
**
  Veteran Buffalo Sabres broadcaster Ted Darling will be inducted into the 
club's Hall of Fame Sunday, April 11.  Darling, who joined the expansion 
Sabres in 1970, was the team's play-by-play announcer on both television 
and radio until illness forced him out of the booth during last season.
**
  Recalled forwards Viktor Gordiouk and Doug MacDonald from Rochester of 
American Hockey League.

 Calgary Flames
  Acquired veteran right wing Greg Paslawski from Philadelphia for future 
considerations.
**
  Recalled center Todd Harkins and left winger Tomas Forslund from Salt 
Lake City of International Hockey League.

 Chicago Blackhawks
        The $175 million, privately financed United Center, scheduled to 
open in August 1994, will be home to the NBA's Chicago Bulls and NHL's 
Chicago Blackhawks. The stadium is owned by entities controlled by the two 
teams. The owners apparently still have not made a decision on whether the 
old Chicago Stadium will be razed for parking space once the new facility, 
located directly across the street, opens.
  Suspended defenseman Craig Muni indefinitely for failing to report 
following a trade with Edmonton.

 Detroit Red Wings
  Acquired defenseman Steve Konroyd from Hartford for a sixth-round draft 
pick.
  Annnounced the signing of right wing Joe Frederick, their 13th pick in 
the 1989 National Hockey League entry draft.
**
  Two contrite hockey fans have returned the stolen Michigan Sports Hall 
of Fame plaque honoring Detroit Red Wing great Gordie Howe. The bronze 
plaque was stolen more than four years ago from Cobo Hall in Detroit, site 
of the Michigan Hall of Fame.

 Edmonton Oilers
  Sent forward Esa Tikkanen to the New York Rangers for center Doug 
Weight.
  Traded defenseman Craig Muni to Chicago for forward Mike Hudson.
  NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said the Edmonton Oilers' lease with 
Northlands Coliseum must be improved if the team is to survive in the 
city. Edmonton Northlands is a non-profit agency set up by the city to 
administer exhibition facilities including the Coliseum.  Oilers owner 
Peter Pocklington calls his lease with Northlands horrendous and has 
threatened to move the team if he doesn't get a better deal. He makes no 
money from parking, concessions or building advertising. The 17,313-seat 
Coliseum also has few of the lucrative private boxes that produce 
significant revenues for other owners.
  Announced center Kevin Todd will not need surgery but will miss the 
remainder of the season with a separated shoulder.

 Hartford Whalers
  Sent defenseman Steve Konroyd to Detroit for a sixth-round draft pick.
  Acquired left winger Robert Kron and a third-round draft pick from 
Vancouver for left winger Murray Craven and a fifth-round draft pick.
**
  The state of Connecticut will begin negotiations to buy the Civic Center 
from the city in an effort to keep the financially struggling Hartford 
Whalers franchise in the city.

 Los Angeles Kings
  Sent center John McIntyre to the New York Rangers for defenseman Mark 
Hardy and Ottawa's fifth-round 1993 draft pick.

 Minnesota North Stars
1-800-800-0435 if calling from the U.S.
1-800-800-0458 if calling from Canada
  The Dallas City Council has approved an agreement with the Minnesota 
North Stars that will bring the NHL club to Reunion Arena next season.
  Defenseman Mark Tinordi, captain of the North Stars, will be sidelined 
the rest of the season, including any postseason games the North Stars 
might play, because of a broken collarbone.
  Acquired defenseman Mark Osiecki from Winnipeg for ninth- and 10th-round 
draft picks in 1993.
  Added defenseman Travis Richards from the University of Minnesota.
  A former employee filed a sexual harassment suit against Minnesota North 
Star owner Norman Green. Karen (Kari) Dziedzic, Green's former executive 
assistant, claims Green often instructed her to wear cosmetics, described 
her outfits as "very hot" and "very sexy," once slapped her hand as she 
was about to eat and humiliated her by grabbing her hand and rubbing it 
through a client's hair.
  The Minnesota North Stars, who will move to Dallas after this season, 
announced that nearly 11,000 season ticket reservations have been made for 
their new home at Reunion Arena, which has a capacity of 16,800.
  The Met Center commission has told the Minnesota North Stars that it 
wants the club out - with its keys returned - at midnight after the last 
home game.  The club is moving to Dallas for next season.  The club must 
pay unpaid interest of $4,492.80 on the team's late rent payment for 1992, 
which was made earlier this month, and has been instructed not to take 
property such as the scoreboard and Zamboni ice-surfacing machine.
**
  Derian Hatcher's game-misconduct penalty was rescinded by the NHL, 
allowing the Minnesota defenseman to play in the North Stars' last two 
regular-season games.  Hatcher was given the penalty during a fight at the 
end of a loss at St. Louis on Sunday, April 11.  But the league didn't 
rescind the game-misconduct penalty Shane Churla received.  The Stars 
recalled center Cal McGowan from their top minor league club in Kalamazoo, 
Mich., to replace Churla.

 Montreal Canadiens
  Acquired defenseman Rob Ramage from Tampa Bay for minor league 
defensemen Eric Charron and Alain Cote and future considerations.

 New Jersey Devils
**
  Bernie Nicholls publicly apologized for his criticism of referee Denis 
Morel after the Devils' 5-2 loss to the Buffalo Sabres.  Nicholls was 
ejected by Morel for being the third man in on a fight late in the second 
period of that game and afterward Nicholls called Morel "a homer" and "an 
embarrassment to the referee's association."

 New York Islanders
  Traded right wing Daniel Marois to Boston for a conditional draft 
choice.

 New York Rangers
  Obtained forward Esa Tikkanen from Edmonton for center Doug Weight.
  Acquired left winger Mike Hartman from Tampa Bay 
  Acquired center John McIntyre from Los Angeles for defenseman Mark Hardy 
and Ottawa's fifth-round 1993 draft pick.
  Defenseman Brian Leetch will undergo additional surgery on the right 
ankle he broke in a non-skating fall and is not expected to play again 
this season. Leetch suffered the broken ankle March 19 following a victory 
over San Jose. The team said he slipped on an icy patch of pavement as he 
was getting out of a taxi cab in front of his apartment.
**
  Announced that defenseman James Patrick will require surgery on a 
herniated disc in his back and will not play again this season.
**
  Returned goaltender Corey Hirsch to Binghamton of the American Hockey 
League.

 Ottawa Senators
        The Ottawa Senators received the go-ahead to build the 18,500-seat 
Palladium on the proposed location in nearby Kanata, Ont.  The projected 
cost is C$150 million. Construction will be postponed until the 1995-96 
season, one year behind schedule.
  The Ottawa Senators lost their 37th consecutive NHL road game to tie the 
1974-75 Washington Capitals for most road losses in a row.
**
  Assigned left wing Martin St. Amour to New Haven of the American Hockey 
League.

 Philadelphia Flyers
  The opening date of Spectrum II has been pushed back to fall 1995. 
Formal groundbreaking has been postponed indefinitely.
  Traded veteran right wing Greg Paslawski to the Calgary Flames for 
future considerations.

 Pittsburgh Penguins
  Traded left winger Bob Errey to Buffalo for defenseman Mike Ramsey.
  Reacquired defenseman Peter Taglianetti from Tampa Bay Lightning for a 
third-round 1993 draft choice.
**
  Revolutionary Comics of San Diego agreed to destroy all available copies 
of a Mario Lemieux comic book in a settlement with the Pittsburgh Penguins 
over a trademark infringement lawsuit.  The Penguins sued in February 
charging that the "Sport Stars Mario Lemieux" comic infringed on the 
team's logo and uniform, which are registered trademarks.

 Quebec Nordiques
1-800-463-3333

 St. Louis Blues
  St. Louis Blues center Ron Sutter will miss the rest of the season as a 
result of separating his right shoulder.

 San Jose Sharks
  The San Jose Sharks announced that ticket prices will increase by about 
30% for the 1993-94 season when they move from the Cow Palace into a new 
$155-million arena in San Jose.
**
  Recalled defenseman Tom Pederson from Kansas City of the International 
Hockey League.
**
  Reached agreement in principle with left wing Alexander Cherbayev.

 Tampa Bay Lightning
1-800-881-2639
        At least two investor groups are poised to build a sports arena in 
downtown Tampa if the delay-plagued company that holds a lease from the 
Tampa Bay Lightning bows out. Tampa Coliseum Inc. has a lease with the 
National Hockey League team to develop an entertainment and sports arena 
next to Tampa Stadium, but has been unable to raise enough money for the 
project.
  Sent left winger Mike Hartman to the New York Rangers for center Randy 
Gilhen.
  Sent defenseman Peter Taglianetti to Pittsburgh for a third-round 1993 
draft choice.
  Sent defenseman Rob Ramage to the Montreal Canadiens for minor league 
defensemen Eric Charron and Alain Cote and future considerations.
**
  Manon Rheaume's first starting appearance in goal for the Atlanta 
Knights was impressive enough for her coach to say she has a chance to be 
a backup goalie for another minor league team next season. Rheaume, the 
first female to play professional hockey, stopped 25 shots and gave up six 
goals against the Cincinnati Cyclones on Saturday night, April 10. After 
the game, her coach, Gene Ubriaco, said Rheaume performed well enough to 
compete for the No. 2 goalie spot with the Louisville IceHawks of the East 
Coast Hockey League next season. The Knights and the IceHawks are minor 
league clubs of the Tampa Bay Lightning.
**
  As their first season comes to a close, there are rumors swirling that 
the Tampa Bay Lightning just might become the Atlanta Lightning.  Or the 
Minnesota Lightning.  But they are just rumors, according to Lightning 
general manager Phil Esposito.  ESPN reported on Sunday, April 11, that 
the Lightning, who have been playing in 10,400-seat Expo Hall, are 
exploring opportunities to move to either Atlanta or Minneapolis.  But 
Esposito said there was no truth to the report.  "We were disappointed 
with ESPN's irresponsible comment," Esposito said.  "There is just no 
substance to the rumor." Rumors have been swirling for the past two years 
regarding a move by Tampa Bay, which is presently discussing plans to 
build a new arena.

 Toronto Maple Leafs
**
  Defenseman Matt Martin, who helped Maine win the 1993 NCAA hockey 
championship, gave up his final year of eligibility and signed a contract 
with the Toronto Maple Leafs.

 Vancouver Canucks
       The Vancouver Canucks have cleared the last hurdle in their effort 
to build a new stadium. Vancouver council has given the green light for 
the 100 million dollar complex. It will seat 20 thousand people and will 
have an adjoining office tower. It will be built between the viaducts near 
B.C. Place in Vancouver. Site preparation will begin this summer, with a 
completion date of Fall 1995.
  Traded left winger Robert Kron and a third-round draft pick to Hartford 
for left winger Murray Craven and a fifth-round draft pick.
  Obtained defenseman Dan Ratushny from Winnipeg for a ninth-round draft 
pick.
**
  Signed right wing Brian Loney to a multi-year contract and assigned him 
to Hamilton of American Hockey League (AHL).

 Washington Capitals
(301) 808-CAPS
  Traded goaltender Jim Hrivnak and future considerations to Winnipeg for 
goaltender Rick Tabaracci.

 Winnipeg Jets
        Winnipeg Jets have been allowed economic assistance in order to 
keep them in the Smythe division as a result of expansion.
  Sent defenseman Mark Osiecki to Minnesota for ninth- and 10th-round 
draft picks in 1993.
  Sent goaltender Rick Tabaracci to Washington for Jim Hrivnak and future 
considerations.
  Sent defenseman Dan Ratushny to Vancouver for a ninth-round draft pick.
  Winnipeg's Teemu Selanne broke the NHL's rookie points record. The Jets 
rookie tied the record of 109 points, set by Peter Stastny with Quebec 
(1980-81), with a goal, his 66th of the season, and moved ahead on an 
assist in a 5-4 loss to Toronto.
**
  The Fort Wayne Komets said they have been told by Winnipeg that the Jets 
will keep a minor league affiliation with Moncton of the American Hockey 
League. There have been reports the Jets would move players from Moncton 
to Fort Wayne next season.

-----

- Expansion news:

  The National Hockey League announced that the expansion Anaheim and 
South Florida franchises will join the league for the 1993- 1994 season.

        Disney and National Hockey League officials announced Monday, 
March 1, that the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, Disney's expansion team, will 
take to the ice next fall. Michael Eisner, chairman and chief executive 
officer of the Walt Disney Co., said the Mighty Ducks will play at the 
Pond, the new Anaheim sports arena, near Disney's flagship theme park. The 
arena is under construction and will be completed in June. The Pond seats 
17,350. The team still must meet the league's requirement that it sell at 
least 10,000 season tickets for the final grant of NHL membership.

        Anaheim named Jack Ferreira general manager and Pierre Gauthier 
assistant general manager.
**
  Veteran NHL scout Al Godfrey has been hired as the Midwest regional 
scout for the Anaheim Mighty Ducks.

        Philadelphia Flyers' senior vice president Bobby Clarke was named 
Monday, March 1, to the post of general manager for Miami's NHL expansion 
team. Franchise owner H. Wayne Huizenga made the announcement at the Miami 
Arena, three months after being awarded a franchise. Huizenga said he 
plans to have a team on the ice in time for the beginning of the NHL 
season in October.

-----

- Realignment:

Eastern Conference

Atlantic Division

Washington Capitals, New Jersey Devils, New York Islanders, New York 
Rangers, Philadelphia Flyers, South Florida, Tampa Bay Lightning

Northeast Division

Boston Bruins, Buffalo Sabres, Hartford Whalers, Montreal Canadiens, 
Ottawa Senators, Pittsburgh Penguins, Quebec Nordiques

Western Conference

Central Division

Chicago Blackhawks, Dallas Stars, Detroit Red Wings, St. Louis Blues, 
Toronto Maple Leafs, Winnipeg Jets

Pacific Division

Anaheim Mighty Ducks, Calgary Flames, Edmonton Oilers, Los Angeles Kings, 
San Jose Sharks, Vancouver Canucks

  Schedule: Eastern Conference teams will play five games against each of 
six divisional opponents (30); four games against each of the seven teams 
in the conference's other division (28) and two games against each of the 
12 Western Conference members (24).

Western Conference teams will play six games against each of five 
divisional opponents (30); four games against each of the six teams in the 
conference's other division (24) and two games against each of the 14 
Eastern Conference clubs (28).

  Playoffs: The system will be conference-based, with the No. 1 team 
meeting the No. 8 team in the first round, No. 2 vs. No. 7, No. 3 vs. No. 
6 and No. 4 vs. No. 5. Matchups will be based on overall points with the 
four division champions being placed in the first- or second-place seeds 
in each conference and being assured of home-ice in the first two playoff 
rounds. All series will be best of seven (2-2-1-1-1 rotation) except 
matchups between Central and Pacific teams.  Those series will rotate 2-3-
2 to reduce travel.  In those cases, the team with the most regular-season 
points will choose whether to start the series at home or away.

-----

- Draft news:

        Under terms of the new expansion draft, which will be held in 
June, each of the 24 existing clubs will be allowed to protect one 
goaltender, five defensemen and nine forwards. The most recent expansion 
drafts allowed teams to protect two goalies and did not make a distinction 
between forwards and defensemen.
        First-year pros only will be exempt from the draft, which is down 
from the two-year exemption teams had last season. San Jose, Tampa Bay and 
Ottawa still will be allowed to exempt second-year pros.
        Each of the 24 teams will lose two players, with a maximum loss of 
one goaltender and a maximum loss of one defenseman. The one exception is 
that a team which loses a goaltender can then no longer lose a defenseman.
        At the end of the first phase of the draft, the two new franchises 
will have three goaltenders, eight defensemen and 13 forwards for a total 
of 24 players. A second phase then will be conducted where San Jose, Tampa 
Bay and Ottawa will select two players each from the rosters of the two 
new teams.
        Ottawa, Tampa Bay and San Jose will be guaranteed priority 
drafting selection in the 1993 draft as long as they have the three worst 
records. Anaheim and Miami will choose no lower than fourth and fifth. The 
expansion franchises will move up in the draft should either San Jose, 
Tampa Bay or Ottawa not finish in the bottom three positions.
        The two new teams will pick first and second in the 1994 Entry 
Draft, regardless of their finish in 1993-94. Should either of the two new 
teams not play next season they would have priority drafting position in 
1994.

        The owners announced the 1994 draft will be in Hartford and the 
1995 draft in Winnipeg. The 1994 draft was scheduled for Boston, but a 
delay in the construction of a new arena required the draft be moved.

-----
 
- League news:


  The NHL owners and players have resolved differences over salary 
arbitration procedures, clearing the way for about 40 hearings.  NHLPA 
executive director Bob Goodenow didn't disclose how the issues were 
resolved, but the prior sticking point had been the manner in which 
statistics were used in arbitration hearings.


  The NHL announced February 26, 1993, it will not make professional 
players available to compete in the 1994 Winter Olympics.

League Leadership:

        Los Angeles Kings owner Bruce McNall succeeded Blackhawks owner 
Bill Wirtz as chairman of the NHL's powerful Board of Governors. Appointed 
to join McNall on the Executive Committee were Ron Corey of the Montreal 
Canadiens, Mike Ilitch of the Detroit Red Wings, Peter Pocklington of the 
Edmonton Oilers and Ed Snider of the Philadelphia Flyers.

        Gary Bettman, vice president and general counsel of the National 
Basketball Association, was named commissioner of the National Hockey 
League, Friday, December 11, 1992.


        Henri Richard, Bernie Parent and Billy Smith have been named 
special ambassadors for the Stanley Cup Centennial, a season-long 
celebration of the NHL championship trophy. The trio will appear at 
league-wide function such as the All-Star Game and Stanley Cup playoffs.

        The National Hockey League named John N. Turner, former Prime 
Minister of Canada, to serve on Board of Directors of Hockey Hall of Fame 
and Museum and nominated Scotty Morrison, David M. Taylor, Larry Bertuzzi, 
Robert G. Bundy, Walter Bush, Murray Costello, Jim Gregory, Leslie Kaplan, 
Lawrence G. Meyer and Alan Tonks to serve on Board, which takes office 
March 30.

  NHL President Gil Stein was one of four individuals elected to the 
Hockey Hall of Fame Builder's category. The others were Buffalo Sabres' 
Chairman of the Board and President Seymour Knox III, Vancouver Canucks' 
Chairman Frank Griffiths and veteran Canadian hockey executive Fred Page. 
Former NHL linesman John D'Amico was selected in the Hall of Fame's 
Referee-Linesman category.

-----
 
- NHL TV

 Games are carried on TSN and CBC in Canada, on ESPN in the U.S.  Check 
your local listings.

        The National Hockey League has struck a conditional five-year deal 
with ESPN to televise professional hockey through the 1996-97 season.
        The series of agreements grants ESPN exclusive national coverage 
of the NHL starting with the 1992-93 season, and the cable network has an 
option to extend the term of that domestic agreement for four more years. 
The deal also grants ESPN exclusive international television distribution, 
excluding Canada, for the next five years.
        The league's new TV contract calls for ESPN to televise up to 25 
regular-season games to its domestic audience this coming season and 37 
playoff games, including the entire Stanley Cup Final. The majority of 
ESPN's regular-season games will be televised on Friday nights.

        NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman announced Wednesday, March 3, that 
ABC Sports will televise five Stanley Cup playoff games starting next 
month. ABC will carry the playoff games on its network through an 
arrangement with ESPN, the U.S. rightsholder for NHL games. ESPN will 
provide the production of the games. ABC owns ESPN.
  April 18 - Wales Conference Game #1 Quarterfinals
  April 25 - Campbell Conference Game #4 Quarterfinals
  May 2 - Wales Conference Game #1 Semifinals
  May 9 - Campbell Conference Game #4 Semifinals
  May 16 - Wales Conference Game #1 Finals

-----
 
- Award winners, all-star teams, hall of fame inductees, and draft picks
 
 91-92 Award Winners:
 Hart Trophy (MVP): Mark Messier (NYR)
 Vezina Trophy (best goalie): Patrick Roy (Mon)
 Norris Trophy (best defenseman): Brian Leetch (NYR)
 Calder Trophy (best rookie): Pavel Bure (Van)
 Selke Trophy (best defensive forward): Guy Carbonneau (Mon)
 Lady Byng Trophy (sportsmanship): Wayne Gretzky (LA)
 Jack Adams Award (best coach): Pat Quinn (Van)
 Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (perseverance): Mark Fitzpatrick (NYI)
 King Clancy Trophy (contribution to community): Ray Bourque (Bos)
 Jennings Trophy (lowest team GAA): Patrick Roy (Mon)
 Art Ross Trophy (most scoring points): Mario Lemieux (Pit)

        Hall of Famer players Frank Boucher and Red Dutton and executives 
Bruce McNall and Gil Stein Thursday were named the 1993 winners of the 
Lester Patrick Award for ``outstanding service to hockey in the United 
States''. The award is selected each year by a committee representing a 
wide cross-section of the hockey community.

 91-92 1st All-Star Team: Patrick Roy (G, Mon), Ray Bourque (D, Bos), 
Brian Leetch (D, NYR), Mark Messier (C, NYR), Brett Hull (RW, StL), Kevin 
Stevens (LW, Pit)

 92-93 All-Star Game Starters (as voted by fans):
Wales Conference: Mario Lemieux (C, Pittsburgh), Jaromir Jagr (W, 
Pittsburgh), Kevin Stevens (W, Pittsburgh), Ray Bourque (D, Boston), Brian 
Leetch (D, Rangers), Patrick Roy, (G, Montreal).
Campbell Conference: Steve Yzerman (C, Detroit), Brett Hull (W, St. 
Louis), Pavel Bure (W, Vancouver), Chris Chelios (D, Chicago), Paul Coffey 
(D, Los Angeles), Ed Belfour (G, Chicago)

 91-92 All-rookie team: Gilbert Dionne (LW, Mon), Tony Amonte (RW, NYR), 
Kevin Todd (C, NJ), Vladimir Konstantinov (D, Det), Nicklas Lidstrom (D, 
Det), Dominik Hasek (G, Chi).

 1992 Hall of Fame Inductees: Marcel Dionne, Bob Gainey, Lanny McDonald, 
and Woody Dumart.

 First round of the 1992 entry draft:
  # Player (pos, team)
  1 Roman Hamrlik (D, TB)
  2 Alexei Yashin (C, Ott)
  3 Mike Rathje (D, SJ)
  4 Todd Warriner (LW, Que)
  5 Darius Kasparaitis (D, NYI)
  6 Cory Stillman (C, Cal)
  7 Ryan Sittler (LW, Phi)
  8 Brandon Convery (C, Tor)
  9 Robert Petrovicky (C, Har)
 10 Andrei Nazarov (LW, SJ)
 11 David Cooper (D, Buf)
 12 Sergei Krivokrasov (LW, Chi)
 13 Joe Hulbig (LW, Edm)
 14 Sergei Gonchar (D, Was)
 15 Jason Bowen (LW, Phi)
 16 Dmitri Kvartalnov (LW, Bos)
 17 Sergei Bautin (D, Win)
 18 Jason Smith (D, NJ)
 19 Martin Straka (C, Pit)
 20 David Wilkie (D, Mon)
 21 Libor Polasek (C, Van)
 22 Curtis Bowen (LW, Det)
 23 Grant Marshall (RW, Tor)
 24 Peter Ferraro (C, NYR)

-----

- New NHL Rules

 Game ejection for instigating a fight.
 Helmets are optional.
 Grabbing an opponent's stick as a defensive move is a penalty.
 Diving to draw a penalty is a penalty.
 Coincidental minors when both teams are full-strength result in 4 vs. 4 
play.
 High sticking is from the waist up.

 - New CBA - ratified by NHLPA on 4/11/92
 
 Term: September 16, 1991 to September 15, 1993.
 
 Licensing and endorsements: Players own exclusive rights to their 
individual personality, including their likenesses.
 
 Salary arbitration: New rules negotiated; 8 salary arbitrators to be 
jointly agreed upon.
 
 Free agency: Compensation scale reduced for players age 30 and under. 
Group III free agent age reduced to 30 from 31. A player who has completed 
10 or more professional seasons (minor or NHL) and who in last year of 
contract didn't earn more than the average NHL salary, can elect once in 
his career to become an unrestricted free agent at the end of his 
contract.
 
 Salary and awards: Players' playoff fund increased to $7.5M in 1991-92 & 
$9M in 92-93. New minimum salary of $100,000.
 
 Insurance: $200,000 disability coverage. Dental & broad-based medical 
improvements. 100% increase in life insurance for players; coverage for 
wives.
 
 Pension: Improved pension contributions of $8000 to $12500 per player per 
year, depending on the player's number of NHL games. Agreement on language 
to guarantee continuation of Security Plan negotiated in 1986.
 
 Regular season: Increased from 80 to 84 games in 92-93. For 2 games 
played at neutral sites, all arrangements and revenues to be shared.
 
 Rosters: Kept at 18 skaters and 2 goaltenders for 92-93.
 
 Entry draft: Reduced to 11 rounds from 12.
 
 Supplemental draft: One selection for each non-playoff team.
 
 Joint study group: Examine financial state of NHL & issue report to 
assist in preparing for 1993 negotiations

-----
 
 NHL free agency categories (effective until 9/15/93)

 Group I:
  - players aged 24 and under
  - player's choice of player equalization or draft pick compensation
  - for compensation, old club has right to match offer from new club
  - for equalization, old club has no right to match offer
  - equalization, which can consist of players, draft picks, and/or cash,
    must be agreed upon between two clubs or submitted to arbitration

 Group II:
  - players aged 25 to 29
  - player's choice of player equalization or draft pick compensation
  - for equalization, old club has right to match offer only if it is
    at least $351,000
  - for compensation, schedule is:
    one first round pick if player signs for $350,000-$500,000/year
    two first round picks if player signs for $500,000-$1 million/year
    extra first round pick for each additional $1M over $1M/year

 Group III:
  - players aged 30 and over
  - old club gets no compensation, but has right to match offer
  - to receive right to match, old club must make qualifying offer of 15%
    over player's salary in prior season

 Group IV:
  - players considered defected free agents

 Group V:
  - player with 10 years of experience whose salary is below NHL average
    can choose to be a free agent without compensation once in his career.
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
2. NHL Minor Leagues

 The NHL minor leagues are the International Hockey League, the American 
Hockey League and the East Coast Hockey League.  Information on the 
Central Hockey League and the American Hockey Association can be found in 
section 4.

-----
 
 IHL
 
 contacts:
  IHL: Rob Springall 
  Atlanta Knights: Scott Clarkson 
  Cincinnati Cyclones: Joseph Combs 
  Cleveland Lumberjacks: Rob Gasser 
  Ft. Wayne Komets: Rob Gasser 
**
  Milwaukee Admirals: Jason Hanson 
  Salt Lake Golden Eagles: Roland Behunin 

  The International Hockey League has granted a franchise to a Las Vegas 
group headed by Henry Stickney for the 1993-1994 season.

**
        The International Hockey League named Bob Chase. voice of the Fort 
Wayne Komets, as the league's broadcaster of the year. The IHL also said 
the annual award, effective next year, will be named in Chase's honor.
        Also honored by the IHL were Jim Loria of the Kansas City Blades 
as marketing director of the year, Shelly Gartner of the Phoenix 
Roadrunners as merchandise manager of the year and Steve Doherty of the 
Kalamazoo Wings as public relations director of the year.

**
        The Atlanta Knights of the International Hockey League announced 
Thursday, April 8, that Manon Rheaume will be the starting goaltender in a 
home game Saturday night, April 10, against the Cincinnati Cyclones. 
Rheaume will become the first female to start in a regular season 
professional hockey game.

**
Fort Wayne -- Announced winger Scott Gruhl will retire at the end of the 
International Hockey League season. Gruhl will join the Muskegon Fury of 
the Colonial League.
**
  The Fort Wayne Komets said they have been told by Winnipeg that the Jets 
will keep a minor league affiliation with Moncton of the American Hockey 
League. There have been reports the Jets would move players from Moncton 
to Fort Wayne next season.

**
  The San Diego Gulls of the International Hockey League set a record with 
their 61st victory, 5-1, over the Salt Lake Golden Eagles. The Gulls (61-
11-8) became the first team in professional hockey to win that many games 
in a season. The 1976-77 Montreal Canadiens won 60 games.

  IHL's 1992 Turner Cup: The Kansas City Blades defeated Muskegon 
Lumberjacks 4 games to 0.

-----
 
 AHL

 contacts:
  AHL: Rob Springall 
       Bri Farenell 
       Mark Anania 

See Section 5 for newsletter information.

 Atlantic Division: Cape Breton, Fredericton, Halifax, Moncton, St. John's
 Northern Division: Adirondack, Capital District, Providence, New Haven, 
Springfield
 Southern Division: Baltimore, Binghamton, Hershey, Rochester, Utica, 
Hamilton

       The New Haven Senators have been sold by Peter Shipman to the 
Ottawa Senators NHL organization. They are the only Canadian NHL team with 
an American AHL affiliate, and have made it clear they intend to move the 
team to somewhere in the Canadian Atlantic Provinces. This sale and move 
has yet to be approved by the AHL head office, but is expected to pass 
easily at the general meeting in May.
  The Baltimore Skipjacks, the Washington Capitals' American Hockey League 
affliate, will skate next season as the Portland Pirates.
  The Calgary Flames will base their farm team in the AHL in St. John, New 
Brunswick next season.  The team will be called the St. John Blue Flames.
**
  The Fort Wayne Komets of the IHL said they have been told by Winnipeg of 
the NHL that the Jets will keep a minor league affiliation with Moncton of 
the American Hockey League. There have been reports the Jets would move 
players from Moncton to Fort Wayne next season.

  AHL's 1992 Calder Cup: The Adirondack Red Wings beat the St. John's 
Maple Leafs 4 games to 3. The home-ice curse held true as all games in the 
final were won by the visiting team. 
  John Anderson (New Haven) is 1992 winner of Les Cunningham Plaque as AHL 
MVP.
 
-----
 
 ECHL

contacts:
  ECHL, Toledo Storm: Rob Gasser 

        The Toledo Storm hockey team is asking SeaGate Convention Center 
to consider becoming its host site beginning with the 1994-95 season. The 
Storm, which has played its last two seasons in the Toledo Sports Arena, 
said it asked for 55 dates in the downtown facility. The Storm also has 
been talking with backers of a proposed ice complex in suburban Sylvania 
to become a primary tenant.

 ECHL's 1992 Riley Cup: Hampton Roads beat Louisville 4 games to 0.

See Section 5 for newsletter information.

-----
 
 Minor League Affiliates for NHL teams:
 
 Bos: Providence Bruins (AHL), Johnstown Chiefs (ECHL)
 Buf: Rochester Americans (AHL), Erie Panthers (ECHL)
 Cal: Salt Lake Golden Eagles (IHL), Roanoke Valley Rebels (ECHL)
 Chi: Indianapolis Ice (IHL), Columbus Chill (ECHL), St. Thomas (Col. HL)
 Det: Adirondack Red Wings (AHL), Toledo Storm (ECHL)
 Edm: Cape Breton Oilers (AHL), Winston-Salem Thunderbirds (ECHL)
 Har: Springfield Indians (AHL), Louisville Icehawks (ECHL)
 LA : Phoenix Roadrunners (IHL), Raleigh Icecaps (ECHL)
 Min: Kalamazoo Wings (IHL), Dayton Bombers (ECHL)
 Mon: Fredericton Canadiens (AHL), Winston-Salem Thunderbirds (ECHL), 
Flint (Col. HL)
 NJ : Utica Devils (AHL), Birmingham Bulls (ECHL)
 NYI: Capital District Islanders (AHL), Richmond Renegades (ECHL)
 NYR: Binghamton Rangers (AHL)
 Ott: New Haven Senators (AHL), Thunder Bay (Col. HL)
 Phi: Hershey Bears (AHL)
 Pit: Cleveland Lumberjacks (IHL), Knoxville Cherokees (ECHL)
 Que: Halifax Citadels (AHL), Greensboro Monarchs (ECHL)
 SJ : Kansas City Blades (IHL), Nashville Knights (ECHL)
 StL: Peoria Rivermen (IHL), Dayton Bombers (ECHL), Flint (Col. HL)
 TB : Atlanta Knights (IHL)
 Tor: St. John's Maple Leafs (AHL), Raleigh Icecaps (ECHL), Brantford 
(Col. HL)
 Van: Columbus Chill (ECHL), Hamilton Canucks (AHL)
 Was: Baltimore Skipjacks (AHL), Hampton Roads Admirals (ECHL)
 Win: Moncton Hawks (AHL), Thunder Bay (Col. HL)
 
 Ind: Cincinnati Cyclones (IHL)
      Fort Wayne Komets (IHL)
      Michigan Falcons (Colonial HL)
      Milwaukee Admirals (IHL)
      San Diego Gulls (IHL)
      St. Thomas (Colonial HL)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
3. College Hockey
 
contacts:
  NCAA: Mike Machnik 
  Wisconsin Badgers: Jeff Horvath 
  CCHA, Bowling Green State: Keith Instone 
  ECAC, Clarkson: Bri Farenell 

- e-mail lists:
 Wayne Smith  maintains 2 lists, one for discussions 
(HOCKEY-L) and one for news (HOCKEY-D):
 
 send e-mail to  with body:
 SUBSCRIBE HOCKEY-L 
 or
 SUBSCRIBE HOCKEY-D 
   (a read-only list containing news from HOCKEY-L)

Up-to-date Division I standings and scores can be obtained through the 
archives of the College Hockey Mailing List.  Send a message to the server 
at listserv@maine.maine.edu with the body containing ONLY the commands 
(either or both)

 - ftp site: andy.bgsu.edu
  The directory "pub/Hockey" contains CCHA press releases, scores, 
standings, and rosters. The sub-directory "Archives" has archives of the 
Division I college hockey mailing list since 1989. Also, archives from the 
Division III list since May 1992 are available.

  NCAA hockey championship:
              Lake Superior State 6, Boston University 1

  Freshman Paul Kariya who was named winner of the 1992-93 Hobey Baker 
Award as college hockey's top player.

**
  The NCAA Division I Hockey Championships will be held at the St. Paul 
Civic Center in St. Paul, Minnesota, on March 31 and April 2, 1994.
  For priority seating call the University of Minnesota Ticket Office at 
(612) 624-8080, between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday or 
send a postcard to:

University of Minnesota Ticket Office
1994 NCAA Hockey Championships
516 15th Avenue SE
Minneapolis  MN  55455

- NCAA Division I Teams
 
 CCHA (Central Collegiate Hockey Association):
Bowling Green, Ferris State, Illinois-Chicago, Lake Superior, Miami, 
Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State, Western Michigan, Notre Dame, Kent 
State, Alaska-Fairbanks (affiliate member )
 
        CCHA Playoff structure:  The top 6 will host the bottom 6 (1 vs 
12, 2 vs 11, etc) in a two-of-three weekend series The six winners will 
advance to Joe Louis Arena for single elimination the rest of the way. The 
top 2 remaining seeds get a bye while 3 plays 6 and 4 plays 5 on the first 
night. On the second night, the 4 remaining teams battle it out, leaving 
only two to play for the championship, on the third night. Alaska-
Fairbanks, as an affiliate member, will be seeded from #7 to #12 by the 
league office.

 ECAC (Eastern College Athletic Conference) (men's):
Brown, Clarkson, Colgate, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, RPI, St. 
Lawrence, Union, Vermont, Yale

 ECAC (Eastern College Athletic Conference) (women's):
Brown, Colby, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, New Hampshire, Northeastern, 
Princeton, Providence, Rochester Institute of Technology, St. Lawrence, 
Yale

        The Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference unveiled the nation's 
first intercollegiate women's ice hockey league and announced the 12 teams 
will begin play in the 1993-94 season. The top eight finishers in the ECAC 
Women's Ice Hockey League will qualify for a post-season tournament. The 
league replaces an informal 15-team conference of nine Division I and six 
Division III schools, which held their own respective division tournaments 
at the end of the regular season. The ECAC said it would discontinue its 
Division III women's tournament after the 1992-93 season.

 Hockey East:
Boston College, Boston University, UMass-Lowell, Maine, Merrimack, New 
Hampshire, Northeastern, Providence
 
 WCHA (Western Collegiate Hockey Association):
Colorado College, Denver, Michigan Tech, Minnesota, Minnesota-Duluth, 
North Dakota, Northern Michigan, St Cloud, Wisconsin
 
Alaska-Anchorage has joined the WCHA as a full-fledged member for 93-94
 
 Independents:
Air Force, Alabama-Huntsville, Alaska-Anchorage, Alaska-Fairbanks, Army

-----

 - Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union

 CIAU Championships:
 Finalists:
 Team:                                         Division:
 University of Alberta Golden Bears            West
 University of Guelph Gryphons                 Ontario West
 University of Toronto Varsity Blues           Ontario East
 University of Acadia Axemen                   East

 Semi-finals:  Acadia 9, Alberta 4
               Toronto 3, Guelph  2
 Finals:  Acadia 12, Toronto 1

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
4. Other Hockey Leagues
 
 - 1992 World Championships in Czechoslovakia
 
 Sweden defeated Finland 5-2 (gold medal match)
 Czechoslovakia defeated Switzerland 5-2 (bronze medal match)
 
 Final Standings (round robin):
 
 GROUP A   W T L  GF GA Pts   GROUP B  W T L  GF GA PTS
 Finland   5 0 0  32  8  10   Russia   4 1 0  23 10   9
 Germany   4 0 1  30 14   8   Czech    4 0 1  18  7   8
 USA       2 1 2  14 15   5   Switz    2 2 1  12 11   6
 Sweden    1 2 2  14 12   4   Canada   2 1 2  15 18   5
 Italy     1 1 3  10 18   3   Norway   1 0 4   8 16   2
 Poland    0 0 5   8 41   0   France   0 0 5   8 22   0
 
 Austria will replace Poland in Pool A of 1993 WC in Germany
 
  The 1993 World Championships (Pool A) is scheduled to run from Apr 18 to 
May 2 in Munich, Germany.

-----
**
 - 1993 World Championships (Pool B) in Eindhoven, the Netherlands

                    #g    w l t    pts      gf    ga
1. Great Britain     7    7 0 0    14       50    13
2. Poland            7    6 1 0    12       71    12
3. Netherlands       7    5 2 0    10       47    20
4. Denmark           7    4 3 0     8       38    24
5. Japan             7    3 4 0     6       34    31
6. Romania           7    2 5 0     4       20    44
7. China             7    1 6 0     2       12    79
8. Bulgaria          7    0 7 0     0        9    58

Great Britain advances to Pool A.  Bulgaria is relegated to Pool C.

-----
 
 - 1992 Olympic Games
**
- e-mail lists:
 Charlie Slavin  maintains OlymPuck - The Olympic 
Hockey Discussion List:
 
 send e-mail to  with body:
SUBSCRIBE   OlymPuck   your_name   favorite country(ies)

 CIS won the gold, Canada the silver, and Czechoslovakia the bronze 
(defeated USA).
 
 Yale hockey coach Tim Taylor was named coach for the '94 US Olympic Team.
 
 Dany Dube from the UQTR Patriotes (CIAU) and Tom Renney from the Kamloops 
Blazers (WHL) are co-coaches of Canada's national program.

     The 1998 Nagano Winter Olympic Organizing Committee said it has 
approved the addition of women's ice hockey and curling to the list of 
official medal events at the Games.  The decision, which came at the 
organizing committee meeting here, followed an accord reached in Nagano 
between the committee and the IOC Coordination Committee.  The decision 
will be formally ratified by an Executive Board meeting of the 
International Olympic Committee (IOC) and its Session.  As a result, the 
number of total events at Nagano will increase to 64 in seven sports.

-----
 
- 1991 Canada Cup
 
 Team Canada defeated Team USA 2 games to 0.
 
-----

 - 1992 Izvestia hockey tournament

 Final:  Russia II - Czechoslovakia  2-1
 Game for 3rd and 4th place:  Russia I - Sweden  4-1
 Game for 5th and 6th place:  Finland - Switzerland  3-1
 Game for 7th and 8th place:  Canada - Germany  6-1

 Final Standings for the 25th Izvestia Cup:
  1. Russia II (the Russian Olympic team)
  2. Czechoslovakia
  3. Russia I
  4. Sweden
  5. Finland
  6. Switzerland
  7. Canada
  8. Germany

-----

- 1992 Germany Cup

        Russia defeated Team Canada 6-3 to win the $170,000 four-team 
Germany Cup for the third time. The Russian team, coached for the first 
time by the legendary Boris Michailov, assured itself of the $67,000 
winner's check after a 3-1 win over Czechoslovakia. The former Soviet 
Union and Commonwealth of Independent States captured the tournament in 
1988 and 1991 under Viktor Tikhonov.

-----

- 1992 Spengler Cup

        Canada, with Fabian Joseph scoring his second goal of the game at 
3:47 of overtime, beat Farjestad (Sweden) 6-5 in the final of the Spengler 
Cup at Davos, Switzerland. The Canadians overcame a two-goal deficit in 
the final two minutes of regulation and went on to earn their second 
overtime victory within 15 hours.

 Final:

 Team Canada - Farjestad (Sweden)  6-5 (1-1,2-2,2-2,1-0)  OT

-----

- 1992 European cup finals

Duesseldorf, December 30, 1992



  This was the third successive European championship for a Swedish team: 
in 1990 and 1991 the champion was Djurgaarden (Stockholm).

-----

- 1993 Sweden Hockey Games
**
 Final Standings:

                     GP  W T L  GF-GA      P
 1. Sweden            3  2 0 1  13- 8  +5  4
 2. Czech Republic    3  2 0 1  16-11  +5  4
 3. Russia            3  1 1 1   9-11  -2  3
 4. Canada            3  0 1 2  13-21  -8  1

 Sweden wins due to head-to-head result vs the Czech republic.

-----
 
- Junior Leagues
 
 contact:
  WHL: Randy Coulman 
       Mitch McGowan 

        The site for the 75th Memorial Cup Tournament has yet to be 
chosen.  It will be staged in Ontario but the exact location won't be 
determined until next spring.
        In March of '93, the two regular-season division champions from 
the Ontario Hockey League will meet in a best-of-seven series at the start 
of the playoff season.  The winner of the series earns the right to host 
the Memorial Cup, traditionally held in May.
        The eventual OHL champion will also participate in the tourney. 
But if the league champs also happen to be the club hosting the Memorial 
Cup, then the league finalists will advance as well."

 Charles Poulin (Mon draft) of St-Hyacinthe (QMJHL) is '92 Canadian Hockey 
League Player of the Year.
 
 1992 Memorial Cup at Seattle
 
 Round-robin standings              W  L  GF  GA
 Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds (OHL)  3  0  14   8
 Kamloops Blazers (WHL)             2  1  10   7
 Seattle Thunderbirds (WHL host)    1  2   9  10
 Verdun College Francais (QMJHL)    0  3   5  13 
 
 Semifinal   Kamloops 8  Seattle 3
 Final       Kamloops 5  Sault Ste. Marie 4
 
-----

 - Central Hockey League
 
 contact:
  Marc Foster 
              
  Ted Wollnik 

See Section 5 for newsletter information.

 CHL:
Fort Worth Fire, Wichita Thunder, Dallas Freeze, Tulsa Oilers, Memphis 
River Kings, Oklahoma City Blazers

  Six non-affiliated teams play a 60 game schedule extending from early 
November to mid March. Each team is owned by the league, with local 
interests controlling day to day operations. Each team has a $100,000 
salary cap for 17 total players (16 dress up). Unlike the ECHL, players 
are not limited to three years in the league.
  A Western Division may be added to the Central Hockey League for the 93-
94 season if the plans of CHL president Ray Miron materialize.  Miron 
confirmed that El Paso, Amarillo, Tuscon, and Albuquerque are cities under 
consideration for the Western Division, which would play some interlocking 
games with the Eastern Division.  Meanwhile, San Antonio and Houston are 
close to being confirmed as the league's newest members.

-----

 - Major League Hockey
 
        A new hockey league with franchises throughout the United States 
and Canada will begin play in the fallof 1993, officials announced 
Wednesday, February 10.
        Major League Hockey was founded by Roy Boe, former president of 
the New York Islanders of the National Hockey League and the New York/New 
Jersey Nets of the American and National Basketball associations.
        According to Boe, the league will debut with six to eight teams 
playing a schedule of approximately 80 games. Franchise applications have 
been received from groups in Chicago, Cleveland, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, 
Houston, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Phoenix, San Francisco, Saskatoon, Toronto 
and Worcester, Mass., Boe said.
        Although the league will not raid existing leagues to stock its 
rosters, Boe said it will seek the ``world's finest hockey players.''
        Boe said league play will have an international flair and 
discussed implementing some rules which are reminiscent of those of the 
IIHF.
        ``We're removing the red line, moving the goal nets forward and 
eliminating all tie games,'' said Boe.
        The MLH office will operate out of Stamford, Conn.

-----
 
- British Premier Division:
 
 contacts:
  Neil A. McGlynn:  (from NA)
                    (from Europe)
  Steve Salvini: 
 
 Contact Steve for the GB USENET draft.

 e-mail list: send e-mail to  to 
subscribe.

 Durham Wasps defeated Nottingham Panthers 7-6 in '92 British championship 
game.
 
-----
 
- Finnish Elite League (SM-LIIGA):

 contacts:
  Juha Koivisto & Kimmo Kauranen  
  Vesa J Pyyluoma 

Final standings 91-92:
  1) Jokerit, Helsinki 2) JyP HT, Jyvaskyla  3) HIFK, Helsinki
  4) Assat, Pori       5) TPS, Turku         6) Lukko, Rauma
  7) KalPa, Kuopio     8) HPK, Hameenlinna   9) Ilves, Tampere
  10) Reipas, Lahti   11) Tappara, Tampere  12) JoKP, Joensuu
  JoKP dropped and Kiekko-Espoo from Espoo qualified to the SM-LIIGA

Individual stats leaders 91-92:
  Points:  Makela Mikko, TPS      25+45=70   (+ playoffs:  2+3=5 )
  Scoring: Selanne Teemu, Jokerit 39+23=62   (+ playoffs: 10+7=17)

All Stars 91-92:
  Briza Petr (Lukko),  Virta Hannu (TPS),  Laurila Harri (JyP HT),
  Makela Mikko (TPS),  Janecky Otakar (Jokerit),  Selanne Teemu (Jokerit)

-----
 
- German Hockey League:
 
 contact:
  Andreas Stockmeier  or 
 
 Duesseldorfer Eishockey-Gemeinschaft defeated SB Rosenheim in '92 German 
final

-----

 - Swedish Elite League (Elitserien):

 contact:
  Staffan Axelsson 

**
 1992-93 regular season final standings:
 1. Vasteras      2. Brynas        3. Malmo         4. Farjestad
 5. MoDo          6. Lulea         7. Leksand       8. Djurgarden
 9. HV 71        10. Rogle        11. Frolunda     12. AIK

 Brynas defeated Lulea 3 games to 2 for the 1993 Swedish hockey 
championship.

-----
 
 - Swiss First Division:

 Kloten became the 1992-93 champions of the Swiss League Nationale A
by beating Fribourg-Gotteron 4-2 to sweep the final series 3-0.

-----
 
 - 1992 Women's World Championships at Finland
  1 Canada, 2 USA, 3 Finland, 4 Sweden, 5 China, 6 Norway, 7 Denmark, 
  8 Switzerland
 
-----

 1993 World Junior Hockey Championships at Sweden

 Final Standings:

                   GP  W T L  GF-GA  +/-   P
 1. Canada          7  6 0 1  37-17  +20  12
 2. Sweden          7  6 0 1  53-15  +38  12
 3. Czechoslovakia  7  4 1 2  38-27  +11   9
 4. USA             7  4 0 3  32-23  + 9   8
 5. Finland         7  3 1 3  31-20  +11   7
 6. Russia          7  2 2 3  26-20  + 6   6
 7. Germany         7  1 0 6  16-37  -21   2
 8. Japan           7  0 0 7   9-83  -74   0

 Canada wins gold due to head-to-head result vs Sweden.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
5. Info available via e-mail

  When requesting items via e-mail please include your preferred address 
in the body of the message.  Sometimes the reply-to address is not a good 
thing to go by.

 - ftp site: wuarchive.wustl.edu (128.252.135.4)
        In directory /doc/misc/sports/nhl there are some new hockey files.
        Get the README file for information and contents.

---

 - E-mail lists:
 
 List Topic (Freq.)                      To Subscribe
 Boston Bruins                           bruins-request@cs.Usask.CA
     List Address                        bruins@cs.Usask.CA
 Buffalo Sabres                          sabres-request@potter.csh.rit.edu
     List Address                        sabres@potter.csh.rit.edu
 Los Angeles Kings                       kings-request@cs.stanford.edu
     List Address                        kings@cs.stanford.edu
**
 Montreal Canadiens                      habs-request@janus.sdsu.edu
     List Address                        habs@janus.sdsu.edu
 Philadelphia Flyers                     seth@hos1cad.att.com
 Pittsburgh Penguins                     gp2f+@andrew.cmu.edu
     List Address                        gp2f@andrew.cmu.edu
 St. Louis Blues                         jca2@cec1.wustl.edu
 San Jose Sharks                         sharks-request@medraut.apple.com
     List Address                        sharks@medraut.apple.com
 Tampa Bay Lightning                     wilson@cs.ucf.edu
 Vancouver Canucks                       boey@sfu.ca
     List Address                        vancouver-canucks@sfu.ca
 Washington Capitals                     david@eng.umd.edu
     List Address                        caps@monster.umd.edu
 NHL Boxscores (M-F)                     bks@cbnewsh.cb.att.com
 NHL Boxscores (S-S)                     jpc@philabs.philips.com
 NHL Goalie Stats (d)                    coulman@cs.Usask.CA
 NHL Scores (n)                          wilson@cs.ucf.edu
 NHL Team Stats (w)                      wilson@cs.ucf.edu
 AHL Newsletter                          ahl-news-request@hamlet.cmu.edu
     List Address                        ahl-news@hamlet.cmu.edu
 ECHL Newsletter                         echl-news-request@andrew.cmu.edu
     List Address                        echl-news@andrew.cmu.edu
 US College Hockey                       (see section 3)
 NCAA Division III Hockey                hockey3-request@hooville.mitre.org
     List Address                        hockey3@request.mitre.org
 CHL Newsletter                          mfoster@geohub.gcn.uoknor.edu
 British League                          uk-hockey-request@uk.ac.hw.cs
**
Olympic Hockey                           (see section 4)

 Freq: M-F=Monday-Friday, S-S=Saturday-Sunday, d=daily, n=nightly, 
w=weekly
 
 If you have something interesting, make it available. When requesting, 
use the keyword in the body or subject. Also, specify team, date, etc., 
where applicable.
 
 Available from Eric Rickin :
 Keyword    Description
 AHLADDR    AHL team addresses
 CANJUNIORS Canada junior teams
 NHLTV      TV stations for each team
 NHLRADIO   Radio stations for each team
 USJUNIORS  US junior teams
 XXXXDRAFT  XXXX (for XXXX=1989-1992) NHL Entry Draft
 1991EXP    1991 NHL Expansion & Dispersal Draft
 
 Available from Rob Springall :
 Keyword    Description
 AHL        Up-to-date info on the AHL
 IHL        Up-to-date info on the IHL
 NHL.C      A C program that prints the 91-92 NHL schedule for a specified 
            day
 
 Available from Stan Willis :
 Keyword    Description
 ATTEND     91-92 NHL team home attendance report by quarters
 PSLOGOS    NHL team logos in PostScript
 
 Available from David Anthony Wyatt :
 Keyword    Description
 ALLLIST    All-time List of Professional Hockey Franchises
 
 Available from Roland Behunin :
 Keyword    Description
 SATINFO    Satellite info for NHL teams
 
 Available from Mike Machnik :
 Keyword    Description
 DIV1SCHED  92-93 NCAA Division I scores
 Mike can also provide a schedule for any of the 46 Division I teams to 
people who ask.  E-mail him for details.

 Available from Bill Clare :
 Keyword    Description
 RETIRED    List of retired numbers for NHL players
 
 Available from Staffan Axelsson :
 Keyword    Description
 WCMEDALS   World Championships Medalists 1920-1992
 WCSTAND    World Championships All-Time Standings, Pool A 1920-1992
 WCALSTAR   World Championships All-Star Teams 1961-1992
 WCROSTXX   World Championships Gold Winning Teams' Rosters 1958-1992 
            (Specify XX=58-92)
 WJHC       History of medals given at the World Junior Hockey 
            Championships
 WJHCSTAT   Team and player stats from the World Junior Hockey 
            Championships.

 Available from Paul Brownlow :
 Keyword    Description
 CHLPOY     Past Canadian Hockey League players of the year
 MEMCUP     Past Memorial Cup winners

 Available from :
 To use the statsmailer, send e-mail to "wilson@cs.ucf.edu" with subject 
"statsmailer" and a body containing the word HELP to receive a list of 
allowable commands. Things available: NHL team/league schedules/calendars, 
a plethora of team statistics, scores of games, and some assorted hockey 
files. Seasons 1988-1992 available. New material was added on 1/19/93.

 Available from Mitch McGowan 
 Keyword    Description
 ROSTERS    1993 NHL All-Star Game rosters
 NHLLEAD    1991-92 NHL Leaders (Scoring, Goals, Assists, Power-play 
            goals, Short-handed goals, Game-winning goals, Shots, Goals-
            against average, Victories, Save percentage, Shutouts)
 ZAMBONI    Alan Thicke's "Book of Zamboni" opening from the 1991 NHL  
            Awards broadcast

 Available from Matt Militzok 
 Keyword    Description
 STATS      Up-to-date NHL statistics

 Available from Harry Peltz 
 Keyword    Description
 SCORES     Compilation of NHL scores for the current month (in compressed 
and uuencoded format)
Dates can also be specified for specific box scores, but try not to 
request too many at one time (Max 5 box scores or three days).

 Available from Richard Stueven 
 Keyword    Description
 DIRECT     Current NHL directory file

 Available from Michael Burger 
 Keyword    Description
 TVINFO     TV/Radio stations for all teams along with network 
            information.

Up-to-date Division I standings and scores can be obtained through the 
archives of the College Hockey Mailing List.  Send a message to the server 
at listserv@maine.maine.edu with the body containing ONLY the commands 
(either or both)

GET 9293CONF STAND (for all Division I conference standings)
GET 9293COMP SCHEDULE (for a full-season listing of Division I scores)

The schedule is about 1000 lines long and the standings file is about 50 
lines.  These files are updated more-or-less weekly around Monday.  
Contact Mike Machnik (nin15b34@merrimack.edu) with any questions.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
6. USENET Hockey Pool
 
 send e-mail to .
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 7. Up-coming Dates

 Apr 18 - May 2: The 1993 World Championships (Pool A), Munich, Germany.
 Jun 26: NHL entry draft, Quebec City, Quebec.
 Feb 12 - Feb 27, 1994: XVII Olympic Winter Games, Lillehammer, Norway.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 8. Answers to some frequently asked questions:
 
 Q: Why are the Montreal Canadiens called the Habs?
 A: Most of the team during the 40-50's was made up of people who lived in 
and around Montreal. Hence they were called "Les Habitants" (natives of 
Montreal). This was then shortened to the Habs.
 
 Q: Why is the Montreal Canadiens logo a large C with an H within it?
 A: In 1914-15, the Canadiens logo consisted of C with an A within it to 
signify Club Athletique Canadien (CAC). The next year, CAC no longer 
existed and it was changed to what it is now to signify Club de Hockey.

 Q: What is the most informative hockey publication?
 A: The Hockey News is preferred by most North American hockey fans. It is 
a weekly journal with up-to-date info.
Phone/fax: 0483 776141 (UK and rest of Europe)
 
 Q: How does a 5-minute power-play count in the penalty killing stats in 
the NHL?
 A: If X goals are scored, then the team gets credit for X goals in X+1 
chances.
 
 Q: How is +/- computed in the NHL?
 A: First, +/- only applies to skaters. Except for a power-play goal, when 
a goal is scored, each skater on the ice for the scoring team is given a 
+, and each skater on the ice for the other team is given a -. Short-
handed goals do count for +/-.
 
 Q: What is the five-hole?
 A: The space between a goalie's pads. There are five major scoring zones: 
(1) upper left corner of goal, (2) upper right, (3) lower left, (4) lower 
right, and (5) five-hole.
 
 Q: What is the meaning of throwing an octopus on the ice?
 A: This tradition began in Detroit in the 1950's when two best-of-seven 
series were required to win the Stanley Cup. Every time Detroit won a 
game, an octopus with one less arm was thrown on the ice.

 Q: Who was the first woman to play in an NHL game?
 A: Manon Rheaume, a 20-year-old goaltender, became the first woman ever 
to play in an NHL game on September 23, 1992 when she started in net for 
the expansion Tampa Bay Lightning in an exhibition against the St. Louis 
Blues. Rheaume played the first period before 8,223 at the 10,400-seat 
Expo Hall on the Florida State Fairgrounds and allowed two goals on nine 
shots. She left with the score tied 2-2, although the Lightning ultimately 
lost the game, 6-4.

 Q: What is the richest contract in NHL history?
 A: Mario Lemieux, the superstar center of the Pittsburgh Penguins, signed 
the richest contract in NHL history, a seven-year deal believed to be 
worth about $42 million. Lemieux will earn between $6 million and $7 
million a year, nearly twice as much as any other player in the league.

 Q: Who is the new commissioner of the NHL?
 A: Gary Bettman, vice president and general counsel of the National 
Basketball Association, was named commissioner of the National Hockey 
League, Friday, December 11, 1992. Bettman joined the NBA in 1981 as 
assistant general counsel. He became the league's chief legal officer in 
September of 1984. A New York resident, Bettman graduated from Cornell 
University in 1974 and from New York University School of Law in 1977.

 Q: How many professional hockey leagues are there in North America?
 A: Six:  National, American, International, East Coast, Central and 
Colonial Hockey Leagues.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
9. Miscellaneous:
 
 For field hockey discussions, go to the newsgroup rec.sport.hockey.field.
 For skating discussions, go to the newsgroup rec.skate.
 
 Some sites get another hockey group, called clari.sports.hockey. c.s.h 
consists of the UPI feed for all UPI news articles that are related to 
hockey, including game results, summaries, scores, standings, etc.  Much 
of the information in the NHL team news section comes from this newsgroup.
 
  The rec.sport.hockey Frequently Asked Questions posting is posted semi-
monthly, usually on the 1st and 15th of each month, during the hockey 
season.  This file was originally created by Tom Wilson, who posted it 
during the 1991-92 season.  It was taken over by Mitch McGowan for the 
1992-93 season.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
  Please make corrections via e-mail, indicating "r.s.h FAQ" as the 
subject line. Feel free to start a discussion on any previously mentioned 
topic (but use an appropriate subject line).
 
Mitch McGowan 

1


File 42/1144: Re: Please help an Amiga user find comfort in Windows (91.0%)


>From: stlombo@eos.acm.rpi.edu (Steve J. Lombardi)
>Subject: Please help an Amiga user find comfort in Windows
>Date: 18 May 1993 00:25:14 GMT
>By night I'm an Amiga user. By day I work with windows. I'd be much more 
>comfortable in windows if I had Two things.
>
>1. A good Personal information manager. You know- a calendar, address book,
>reminder list etc... rolled into one clean interface.
>
>2. A good file manager. Microsofts is very poor by my standards. How
>about one that has a left and right window and allows file operations 
>between them. being able to launch programs from the same interface
>would be nice. as well as text reading and graphics viewing. Those
>who are familiar with Directory Opus on the Amiga know what I'm
>looking for.
I have written the file manager HFM, wich has two windows which compare
the files in two directorys to find out wether there are equal or 
similar files. The 7 most important operations, copy, move, delete,
show the file, start a progam, navigate in the directory tree can be
invoked by dragging a directory entry with the mouse. This is very
convenient, because the selection of the file and the operation to
be performed, occur in one move. For bitmap graphic viewing the
program vpic can be integrated, for spreadsheat and database files
I use the view program from PCTOOLS 7.1. HFM can be configured to
use arbitrary viewers to show special data formats. It does
also present archives from pkzip etc. as simulated subdirectorys.
This filemanager has a somewhat non standart user interface, but
it is very convienient to use and is the prefered file manager 
in several labs in our university. 
The drawback of this filemanager is, it's still a dos program and
the development of a windows version has not yet begun. I use the
program package run18.zip, where run tells its windows companion
sched.exe which windows program should be started. In this way you
can start a windows program from a dosbox. The new version 3.19
(to be released soon) includes a new command for automating this
windows program start.
FTP archives for the mentioned programs (all these archives have several
mirror sites)
Simtel oak.oakland.edu 141.210.10.117
/filutl/hfm318.zip
/gif/vpic60e.zip
Garbo garbo.uwasa.fi 128.214.87.1
/dirutil/hfm318.zip
CICA ftp.cica.indiana.edu 129.79.20.17 
/util/run18.zip
-

Andreas Helke, Molekulare Genetik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Germany
email un69ef@genius.embnet.dkfz-heidelberg.de
The header of this posting does not contain a valid smtp mail address.

File 43/1144: FAQ - What is the DoD? (71.5%)


This is a periodic posting intended to answer the Frequently Asked
an expiration time of over a month. Thus, unless your site's news
software is ill-mannered, this posting should always be available.
This WitDoDFAQ is crossposted to all four rec.motorcycles groups in an
attempt to catch most new users, and followups are directed to
rec.motorcycles.

Last changed 9-Feb-93 to add a message from the KotL, and a bit of
Halon.

			VERSION 1.1

This collection was originally assembled by Lissa Shoun, from the
original postings. With Lissa's permission, I have usurped the title of
KotWitDoDFAQ. Any corrections, additions, bribes, etc. should be aimed at
blgardne@javelin.sim.es.com.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

How do I get a DoD number?	by Blaine Gardner	DoD #46
DoD "Road Rider" article	by Bruce Tanner		DoD #161
What is the DoD?		by John Sloan		DoD #11
The DoD Logo			by Chuck Rogers		DoD #3
The DoD  (this started it all)	by The Denizen of Doom	DoD #1
The DoD Anthem			by Jonathan Quist	DoD #94
Why you have to be killed	by Blaine Gardner	DoD #46
The rec.moto.photo.archive	courtesy of Bruce Tanner DoD #161
Patches? What patches?		by Blaine Gardner	DoD #46
Letter from the AMA museum      by Jim Rogers, Director DoD #395
The DoD Rules			by consensus
Other rec.moto resources	by various Keepers	DoD #misc
The rec.moto.reviews.archive	courtesy of Loki Jorgenson DoD #1210
Updated stats & rides info	by Ed Green (DoD #111) and others

------------------------------------------------------------------------
			How do I get a DoD number?

If the most Frequently Asked Question in rec.motorcycles is "What is the
DoD?", then the second most Frequently Asked Question must be "How do I
get a DoD number?" That is as simple as asking the Keeper of the List
(KotL, accept no substitue Keepers) for a number. If you're feeling
creative, and your favorite number hasn't been taken already, you can
make a request, subject to KotL approval. (Warning, non-numeric, non-
base-10 number requests are likely to earn a flame from the KotL. Not
that you won't get it, but you _will_ pay for it.)

Oh, and just one little, tiny suggestion. Ask the KotL in e-mail. You'll
just be playing the lightning rod for flames if you post to the whole
net, and you'll look like a clueless newbie too.

By now you're probably asking "So who's the KotL already?". Well, as
John Sloan notes below, that's about the only real "secret" left around
here, but a few (un)subtle hints can be divulged. First, it is not myself,
nor anyone mentioned by name in this posting (maybe :-), though John was
the original KotL. Second, in keeping with the true spirit of Unix, the
KotL's first name is only two letters long, and can be spelled entirely
with hexadecimal characters. (2.5, the KotL shares his name with a line-
oriented text utility.) Third, he has occasionally been seen posting
messages bestowing new DoD numbers (mostly to boneheads with "weenie
mailers"). Fourth, there is reason to suspect the KotL of being a
Dead-Head.

***************** Newsflash: A message from the KotL ******************

Once you have surmounted this intellectual pinnacle and electronically
groveled to the KotL, please keep in mind that the KotL does indeed
work for a living, and occasionally must pacify its boss by getting
something done.  Your request may languish in mailer queue for (gasp!)
days, perhaps even (horrors!) a week or two.  During such times of
economic activity on the part of the KotL's employers, sending yet
another copy of your request will not speed processing of the queue (it
just makes it longer, verification of this phenominon is left as an
excersize for the reader).  If you suspect mailer problems, at least
annotate subsequent requests with an indication that a former request
was submitted, lest you be assigned multiple numbers (what, you think
the KotL *memorizes* the list?!?).

***********************************************************************

One more thing, the KotL says that its telepathic powers aren't what
they used to be. So provide some information for the list, will ya?
The typical DoD List entry contains number, name, state/country, &
e-mail address. For example:

0111:Ed Green:CA:ed.green@East.Sun.COM

(PS: While John mentions below that net access and a bike are the only
requirements for DoD membership, that's not strictly true these days, as
there are a number of Denizens who lack one or both.)

Blaine (Dances With Bikers) Gardner   blgardne@javelin.sim.es.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------

            "Denizens of Doom", by Bruce Tanner (DoD 0161)

      [Road Rider, August 1991, reprinted with Bruce's permission]

There is a group of motorcyclists that gets together and does all the normal 
things that a bunch of bikers do.  They discuss motorcycles and  
motorcycling, beverages, cleaning fluids, baklavah, balaclava, caltrops,  
helmets, anti-fog shields, spine protectors, aerodynamics, three-angle valve
seats, bird hits, deer whistles, good restaurants, racing philosophy, 
traffic laws, tickets, corrosion control, personalities, puns, double 
entendres, culture, absence of culture, first rides and friendship.  They 
argue with each other and plan rides together.

The difference between this group and your local motorcycle club is that, 
although they get together just about everyday, most have never seen each 
other face to face.  The members of this group live all over the known world 
and communicate with each other electronically via computer.

The computers range from laptops to multi-million dollar computer centers;  
the people range from college and university students to high-tech industry 
professionals to public-access electronic bulletin-board users.  Currently, 
rec.motorcycles (pronounced "wreck-dot-motorcycles," it's the file name for 
the group's primary on-line "meeting place") carries about 2250 articles per 
month;  it is read by an estimated 29,000 people.  Most of the frequent 
posters belong to a motorcycle club, the Denizens of Doom, usually referred 
to as the DoD.

The DoD started when motorcyclist John R. Nickerson wrote a couple of 
parodies designed to poke fun at motorcycle stereotypes.  Fellow computer 
enthusiast Bruce Robinson posted these articles under the pen name, "Denizen 
of Doom."  A while later Chuck Rogers signed off as DoD nr. 0003 Keeper of 
the Flame.  Bruce was then designated DoD nr. 0002, retroactively and, of 
course, Nickerson, the originator of the parodies, was given DoD nr. 0001.

The idea of a motorcycle club with no organization, no meetings and no rules 
appealed to many, so John Sloan -- DoD nr. 0011 -- became Keeper of the 
List, issuing DoD numbers to anyone who wanted one.  To date there have been 
almost 400 memberships issued to people all over the United States and 
Canada, as well as Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, France, 
Germany, Norway and Finland.

Keeper of the List Sloan eventually designed a club patch.  The initial run 
of 300 patches sold out immediately.  The profits from this went to the 
American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation.  Another AMHF fund raiser -- 
selling Denizens of Doom pins to members -- was started by Arnie Skurow a 
few months later.  Again, the project was successful and the profits were 
donated to the foundation.  So far, the Denizens have contributed over $1500 
to the AMA museum.  A plaque in the name of the Denizens of Doom now hangs 
in the Motorcycle Heritage Museum.

As often as possible, the DoD'ers crawl out from behind their CRTs and go 
riding together.  It turns out that the two largest concentrations of 
DoD'ers are centered near Denver/Boulder, Colorado, and in California's 
"Silicon Valley."  Consequently, two major events are the annual Assault on 
Rollins Pass in Colorado, and the Northern versus Southern California 
"Joust."

The Ride-and-Feed is a bike trip over Rollins Pass, followed by a big 
barbecue dinner.  The concept for the Joust is to have riders from Northern 
California ride south; riders from Southern California to ride north, 
meeting at a predesignated site somewhere in the middle.  An additional plan 
for 1991 is to hold an official Denizens of Doom homecoming in conjunction 
with the AMA heritage homecoming in Columbus, Ohio, in July.

Though it's a safe bet the the Denizens of Doom and their collective 
communications hub, rec.motorcycles, will not replace the more traditional 
motorcycle organizations, for those who prowl the electronic pathways in 
search of two-wheeled camaraderie, it's a great way for kindred spirits to 
get together.  Long may they flame.


"Live to Flame -- Flame to Live"	[centerbar]

This official motto of the Denizens of Doom refers to the ease with which 
you can gratuitously insult someone electronically, when you would not do 
anything like that face to face.  These insults are known as "flames";  
issuing them is called "flaming."  Flames often start when a member 
disagrees with something another member has posted over the network.  A 
typical, sophisticated, intelligent form of calm, reasoned rebuttal would be 
something like:  "What an incredibly stupid statement, you Spandex-clad 
poseur!"  This will guarantee that five other people will reply in defense 
of the original poster, describing just what they think of you, your riding 
ability and your cat.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

          _The Denizens of Doom: The Saga Unfolds_

                  by John Sloan  DoD #0011

Periodically the question "What is DoD?" is raised. This is one of
those questions in the same class as "Why is the sky blue?", "If there
is a God, why is there so much suffering in the world?" and "Why do
women inevitably tell you that you're such a nice guy just before they
dump you?", the kinds of questions steeped in mysticism, tradition,
and philosophy, questions that have inspired research and discussion
by philosophers in locker rooms, motorcycle service bays, and in the
halls of academe for generations. 

A long, long time ago (in computer time, where anything over a few
minutes is an eternity and the halting problem really is a problem) on
a computer far, far away on the net (topologically speaking; two
machines in the same room in Atlanta might route mail to one another
via a system in Chicago), a chap who wished to remain anonymous (but
who was eventually assigned the DoD membership #1) wrote a satire of
the various personalities and flame wars of rec.motorcycles, and
signed it "The Denizen of Doom". Not wishing to identify himself, he
asked that stalwart individual who would in the fullness of time
become DoD #2 to post it for him. DoD #2, not really giving a whit
about what other people thought and generally being a right thinking
individual, did so.  Flaming and other amusements followed. 

He who would become the holder of DoD membership #3 thought this was
the funniest thing he'd seen in a while (being the sort that is pretty
easily amused), so he claimed membership in the Denizens of Doom
Motorcycle Club, and started signing his postings with his membership
number. 

Perhaps readers of rec.motorcycles were struck with the vision of a
motorcycle club with no dues, no rules, no restrictions as to brand or
make or model or national origin of motorcycle, a club organized
electronically.  It may well be that readers were yearning to become a
part of something that would provide them with a greater identity, a
gestalt personality, something in which the whole was greater than the
sum of its parts.  It could also be that we're all computer nerds who
wear black socks and sneakers and pocket protectors, who just happen
to also love taking risks on machines with awesome power to weight
ratios, social outcasts who saw a clique that would finally be open
minded enough to accept us as members. 

In a clear case of self fulfilling prophesy, The Denizens of Doom
Motorcycle Club was born. A club in which the majority of members have
never met one another face to face (and perhaps like it that way), yet
feel that they know one another pretty well (or well enough given some
of the electronic personalities in the newsgroup). A club organized
and run (in the loosest sense of the word) by volunteers through the
network via electronic news and mail, with a membership/mailing list
(often used to organize group rides amongst members who live in the
same region), a motto, a logo, a series of photo albums circulating
around the country (organized by DoD #9), club patches (organized by
#11), and even an MTV-style music video (produced by #47 and
distributed on VHS by #18)! 

Where will it end? Who knows? Will the DoD start sanctioning races,
placing limits on the memory and clock rate of the on-board engine
management computers? Will the DoD organize poker runs where each
participant collects a hand of hardware and software reference cards?
Will the DoD have a rally in which the attendees demand a terminal
room and at least a 386-sized UNIX system? Only time will tell. 

The DoD has no dues, no rules, and no requirements other than net
access and a love for motorcycles. To become a member, one need only
ask (although we will admit that who you must ask is one of the few
really good club secrets). New members will receive via email a
membership number and the latest copy of the membership list, which
includes name, state, and email address. 

The Denizens of Doom Motorcycle Club will live forever (or at least
until next year when we may decided to change the name). 

                  Live to Flame - Flame to Live

------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The DoD daemon as seen on the patches, pins, etc. by

	Chuck Rogers,  car377@druhi.att.com,  DoD #0003
 

                :-(           DoD            )-: 
               :-(  x    __         __    x   )-:      
              :-(  x    / /         \ \    x   )-:     
             :-(  x    / / -\-----/- \ \    x   )-:    
            :-(  L     | \/  \   /  \/ |     F   )-:   
            :-(  I     | /    \ /    \ |     L   )-:   
            :-(  V     \/ __   /   __ \/     A   )-:   
            :-(  E     / /  \     /  \ \     M   )-:   
            :-(        | |   \   /   | |     E   )-:   
            :-(  T     | | . | _ | . | |         )-:   
            :-(  O     | \___// \\___/ |     T   )-:   
            :-(         \     \_/     /      O   )-:   
            :-(  F       \___     ___/           )-:   
            :-(  L        \ \     / /        L   )-:   
            :-(  A         \ vvvvv /         I   )-:   
            :-(  M         | (   ) |         V   )-:   
            :-(  E         | ^^^^^ |         E   )-:   
             :-(  x        \_______/        x   )-:    
              :-(  x                       x   )-:     
               :-(  x   rec.motorcycles   x   )-:
                :-(          USENET          )-:


------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      The DoD

              by the Denizen of Doom    DoD #1
 
Welcome one and all to the flamingest, most wonderfullest newsgroup of
all time: wreck.mudder-disciples or is it reak.mudder-disciples? The
Names have been changes to protect the Guilty (riders) and Innocent
(the bikes) alike. If you think you recognize a contorted version of
your name, you don't. It's just your guilt complex working against
you. Read 'em and weep. 

We tune in on a conversation between some of our heros. Terrible
Barbarian is extolling the virtues of his Hopalonga Puff-a-cane to
Reverend Muck Mudgers and Stompin Fueling-Injection: 


     crowd eh?  I mean like I like riding my Yuka-yuka Fudgeo-Jammer
     11 but what the heck.  


     least he is selling his BMW and uses a Hopalonga Intercorruptor!
     Not as good as a Puff-a-cane, should have been called a
     Woosh-a-stream.



     what they say, eh? 


High Tech: Hi, I'm a 9 and the BMW is the greatest.






Muck, Arlow, High: Beats Me, Wilhelm.





     even Villy Ogle flamed me for that! 


Out of the blue the West coasters arrive, led by Tread Orange with
Dill Snorkssy, Heritick Ratatnack, Buck Garnish, Snob Rasseller and
the perenial favorite: Hooter Boobin Brush! 











     ride! 


     They even have luggage made by Sourkraut!


Terrible, Heritick, Dill, Buck: Nahhhhh!!!

Stompin, Tread, High, Chunky, Snob: Yesss Yessssss!!!

Before this issue could be resolved the Hopalonga crew called up more
cohorts from the local area including Polyanna Stirrup and the
infamous Booster Robiksen on his Cavortin! 

     I use on my Hopalonga Evening-Bird Special. Helpful for getting
     it up on the ole ventral stand!  

     Sumarikis and Kersnapis are good too! 






Snob, Tread: Nawwwwww.






Two more riders zoom in, in the form of Pill Turret and Phalanx Lifter.


And Now even more west coasters pour in.
Road O'Noblin: Hopalonga's are the greatest!

Maulled Beerstein: May you sit on a bikejector!

Suddenly more people arrived from the great dark nurth:
Kite Lanolin: Hey, BMW's are great, men.


More riders from the west coast come into the discussion:
Aviator Sourgas: Get a Burley-Thumpison with a belted-rigged frame.

Guess Gasket: Go with a BMW or Burley-Thumpison.

With a roar and a screech the latest mudder-disciple thundered in. It
was none other that Clean Bikata on her Hopalonga CaBammerXorn. 







burst into song: (singing) Beemer Babe, Beemer Babe give me a
thrill... 

Road, Terrible, Polyanna, Maulled, Dill etc.: Wadddoes BMW stand for? 

Heritick, Stompin, Snob, Chunky, Tread, Kite, High, Arlow: BEAT'S ME,
     WILHEM! 

Road, Terrible, Polyanna, Maulled, Dill etc.: Oh, don't you mean BMW? 

And so the ensuing argument goes until the skies clouded over and the
thunder roared and the Greatest Mudder-Disciple (G.M.D.) of them all
boomed out.
     Bigot & Suction powered mini-trikes for your childish actions. 


Does this mean that all of the wreck.mudder-disciples will be riding
mini-trikes?  Are our arguing heros doomed?  Tune in next week for the
next gut wretching episode of "The Yearning and Riderless" with its
ever increasing cast of characters.  Where all technical problems will
be flamed over until well done.  Next week's episode will answer the
question of: "To Helmet or Not to Helmet" will be aired, this is heady
material and viewer discretion is advised. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------

          Script for the Denizens of Doom Anthem Video

                by Jonathan E. Quist   DoD #94


[Scene:  A sterile engineering office.  A lone figure, whom we'll call
Chuck, stands by a printer output bin, wearing a white CDC lab coat,
with 5 mechanical pencils in a pocket protector.] 

(editor's note: For some reason a great deal of amusement was had at
the First Annual DoD Uni-Coastal Ironhorse Ride & Joust by denizens
referring to each other as "Chuck". I guess you had to be there. I
wasn't.) 

 cow-towing to the whims of a machine, and saying yessir, nosir,
 may-I-have-another-sir.  My mother made me do it.  I wanted
 to live a man's life,
[Music slowly builds in background]
 riding Nortons and Triumphs through the highest mountain passes
 and the deepest valleys,
 living the life of a Motorcyclist;
 doing donuts and evading the police;
 terrorizing old ladies and raping small children;
 eating small dogs for tea (and large dogs for dinner).  In short,

	I Want to be      A Denizen!

[Chuck rips off his lab coat, revealing black leather jacket (with
fringe), boots, and cap.  Scene simultaneously changes to the top of
an obviously assaulted Rollins Pass.  A small throng of Hell's Angels
sit on their Harleys in the near background, gunning their engines,
showering lookers-on with nails as they turn donuts, and leaking oil
on the tarmac.  Chuck is standing in front of a heavily chromed Fat
Boy.] 

Chuck [Sings to the tune of "The Lumberjack Song"]:

I'm a Denizen and I'm okay,
I flame all night and I ride all day.

[Hell's Angels Echo Chorus, surprisingly heavy on tenors]:
He's a Denizen and he's okay,
He flames all night and he rides all day.

I ride my bike;
I eat my lunch;
I go to the lavat'ry.
On Wednesdays I ride Skyline,
Running children down with glee.

[Chorus]:
He rides his bike;
He eats his lunch;
He goes to the lavat'ry.
On Wednesdays he rides Skyline,
Running children down with glee.

[Chorus refrain]:
'Cause He's a Denizen...

I ride real fast,
My name is Chuck,
It somehow seems to fit.
I over-rate the worst bad f*ck,
But like a real good sh*t.

Oh, I'm a Denizen and I'm okay!
I flame all night and I ride all day.

[Chorus refrain]:
Oh, He's a Denizen...

I wear high heels
And bright pink shorts,
 full leathers and a bra.
I wish I rode a Harley,
 just like my dear mama.

[Chorus refrain]

------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Why you have to be killed.

Well, the first thing you have to understand (just in case you managed
to read this far, and still not figure it out) is that the DoD started
as a joke. And in the words of one Denizen, it intends to remain one.

Sometime in the far distant past, a hapless newbie asked: "What does DoD
stand for? It's not the Department of Defense is it?" Naturally, a
Denizen who had watched the movie "Top Gun" a few times too many rose
to the occasion and replied:

"That's classified, we could tell you, but then we'd have to kill you."

And the rest is history.

A variation on the "security" theme is to supply disinformation about
what DoD stands for. Notable contributions (and contributers, where
known) include:

Daughters of Democracy (DoD 23)		Doers of Donuts
Dancers of Despair (DoD 9)		Debasers of Daughters
Dickweeds of Denver			Driveway of Death
Debauchers of Donuts			Dumpers of Dirtbikes

Note that this is not a comprehensive list, as variations appear to be
limited only by the contents of one's imagination or dictionary file.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     The rec.moto.photo archive

First a bit of history, this all started with Ilana Stern and Chuck
Rogers organizing a rec.motorcycles photo album. Many copies were made,
and several sets were sent on tours around the world, only to vanish in
unknown locations. Then Bruce Tanner decided that it would be appropriate
for an electronic medium to have an electronic photo album. Bruce has not
only provided the disk space and ftp & e-mail access, but he has taken
the time to scan most of the photos that are available from the archive.

Not only can you see what all these folks look like, you can also gawk
at their motorcycles. A few non-photo files are available from the
server too, they include the DoD membership list, the DoD Yellow Pages,
the general rec.motorcycles FAQ, and this FAQ posting.

Here are a couple of excerpts from from messages Bruce posted about how
to use the archive.

**********************************************************

Via ftp:

cerritos.edu [130.150.200.21]

Via e-mail:

The address is server@cerritos.edu.  The commands are given in the body of the
message.  The current commands are DIR and SEND, given one per line.  The
arguments to the commands are VMS style file specifications.  For
rec.moto.photo the file spec is [DOD]file.  For example, you can send:

dir [dod]
send [dod]bruce_tanner.gif
send [dod]dodframe.ps

and you'll get back 5 mail messages; a directory listing, 3 uuencoded parts
of bruce_tanner.gif, and the dodframe.ps file in ASCII.

Oh, wildcards (*) are allowed, but a maximum of 20 mail messages (rounded up to
the next whole file) are send.  A 'send [dod]*.gif' would send 150 files of
50K each; not a good idea.
-- 
Bruce Tanner        (213) 860-2451 x 596    Tanner@Cerritos.EDU
Cerritos College    Norwalk, CA             cerritos!tanner

**********************************************************

A couple of comments: Bruce has put quite a bit of effort into this, so
why not drop him a note if you find the rec.moto.photo archive useful?
Second, since Bruce has provided the server as a favor, it would be kind
of you to access it after normal working hours (California time). 

------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Patches? What patches?

You may have heard mention of various DoD trinkets such as patches &
pins. And your reaction was probably: "I want!", or "That's sick!", or
perhaps "That's sick! I want!"

Well, there's some good news and some bad news. The good news is that
there's been an amazing variety of DoD-labeled widgets created. The bad
news is that there isn't anywhere you can buy any of them. This isn't
because of any "exclusivity" attempt, but simply because there is no
"DoD store" that keeps a stock. All of the creations have been done by
individual Denizens out of their own pockets. The typical procedure is
someone says "I'm thinking of having a DoD frammitz made, they'll cost
$xx.xx, with $xx.xx going to the AMA museum. Anyone want one?" Then
orders are taken, and a batch of frammitzes large enough to cover the
pre-paid orders is produced (and quickly consumed). So if you want a
DoD doodad, act quickly the next time somebody decides to do one. Or
produce one yourself if you see a void that needs filling, after all
this is anarchy in action.

Here's a possibly incomplete list of known DoD merchandise (and
perpetrators). Patches (DoD#11), pins (DoD#99), stickers (DoD#99),
motorcycle license plate frames (DoD#216), t-shirts (DoD#99), polo shirts
(DoD#122), Zippo lighters (DoD#99) [LtF FtL], belt buckles (DoD#99), and
patches (DoD#99) [a second batch was done (and rapidly consumed) by
popular demand].

All "profits" have been donated to the American Motorcyclist Association
Motorcycle Heritage Museum. As of June 1992, over $5500 dollars has been
contributed to the museum fund by the DoD. If you visit the museum,
you'll see a large plaque on the Founders' Wall in the name of "Denizens
of Doom, USENET, The World", complete with a DoD pin.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's a letter from the AMA to the DoD regarding our contributions.

~Newsgroups: rec.motorcycles
~From: Arnie Skurow 
~Subject: A letter from the Motorcycle Heritage Museum
~Date: Mon, 13 Apr 1992 11:04:58 GMT

I received the following letter from Jim Rogers, director of the Museum,
the other day.

"Dear Arnie and all members of the Denizens of Doom:

Congratulations and expressions of gratitude are in order for you and the
Denizens of Doom!  With your recent donation, the total amount donated is
now $5,500.  On behalf of the AMHF, please extend my heartfeld gratitude
to all the membership of the Denizens.  The club's new plaque is presently
being prepared.  Of course, everyone is invited to come to the museum to 
see the plaque that will be installed in our Founders Foyer.  By the way,
I will personally mount a Denizens club pin on the plaque.  Again, thank 
you for all your support, which means so much to the foundation, the
museum, and the fulfillment of its goals.

                                Sincerely,


                                Jim Rogers, D.O.D. #0395
                                Director

P.S.  Please post on your computer bulletin board."

As you all know, even though the letter was addressed to me personally,
it was meant for all of you who purchased DoD goodies that made this
amount possible.

Arnie

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Rules, Regulations, & Bylaws of the Denizens of Doom Motorcycle Club

From time to time there is some mention, discussion, or flame about the
rules of the DoD. In order to fan the flames, here is the complete text
of the rules governing the DoD.

			Rule #1. There are no rules.
			Rule #0. Go ride.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

		Other rec.motorcycles information resources.

There are several general rec.motorcycles resources that may or may not
have anything to do with the DoD. Most are posted on a regular basis,
but they can also be obtained from the cerritos ftp/e-mail server (see
the info on the photo archive above).

A general rec.motorcycles FAQ is maintained by Dave Williams.
Cerritos filenames are FAQn.TXT, where n is currently 1-5.

The DoD Yellow Pages, a listing of motorcycle industry vendor phone
numbers & addresses, is maintained by bob pakser.
Cerritos filename is YELLOW_PAGES_Vnn, where n is the rev. number.

The List of the DoD membership is maintained by The Keeper of the List.
Cerritos filename is DOD.LIST.

This WitDoD FAQ (surprise, surprise!) is maintained by yours truly.
Cerritos filename is DOD_FAQ.TXT.

Additions, corrections, etc. for any of the above should be aimed at
the keepers of the respective texts.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

(Loki Jorgenson loki@Physics.McGill.CA) has provided an archive site
for motorcycle and accessory reviews, here's an excerpt from his
periodic announcement.

**********************************************************

	The Rec.Motorcycles.Reviews Archives (and World Famous Llama
  Emporium) contains a Veritable Plethora (tm) of bike (and accessories)
  reviews, written by rec.moto readers based on their own experiences.
  These invaluable gems of opinion (highly valued for their potential to
  reduce noise on the list) can be accessed via anonymous FTP, Email
  server or by personal request:

  Anonymous FTP:		ftp.physics.mcgill.ca (132.206.9.13)
					under ~ftp/pub/DoD
  Email archive server:		rm-reviews@ftp.physics.mcgill.ca
  Review submissions/questions:	rm-reviews@physics.mcgill.ca

  NOTE: There is a difference in the addresses for review submission
      and using the Email archive server (ie. an "ftp.").

  To get started with the Email server, send an Email message with a line
  containing only "send help".  

  NOTE: If your return address appears like
	domain!subdomain!host!username
      in your mail header, include a line like (or something similar)
	path username@host.subdomain.domain 

	If you are interested in submitting a review of a bike that you
  already own(ed), PLEASE DO!  There is a template of the format that the
  reviews are kept in (more or less) available at the archive site .
  For those who have Internet access but are unsure of how anonymous
  FTP works, an example script is available on request.

**********************************************************

Reviews of any motorcycle related accessory or widget are welcome too.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Updated stats & rec.motorcycles rides info

Some of the info cited above in various places tends to be a moving
target. Rather than trying to catch every occurence, I'm just sticking
the latest info down here.

Estimated rec.motorcycles readership: 35K  [news.groups]
 
Approximate DoD Membership: 975  [KotL]

DoD contributions to the American Motorcyclist Association Motorcycle
Heritage Museum. Over $5500  [Arnie]
 
                        Organized (?) Rides:

Summer 1992 saw more organized rides, with the Joust in its third
year, and the Ride & Feed going strong, but without the Rollins Pass
trip due to the collapse of a tunnel.  The East Coast Denizens got
together for the Right Coast Ride (RCR), with bikers from as far north
as NH, and as far south as FL meeting in the Blueridge Mountains of
North Carolina.  The Pacific Northwest crew organized  the first Great
Pacific Northwest Dryside Gather (GPNDG), another successful excuse for
riding motorcycles, and seeing the faces behind the names we all have
come to know so well.  [Thanks to Ed Green for the above addition.]

Also worth mentioning are: The first rec.moto.dirt ride, held in the
Moab/Canyonlands area of southern Utah. Riders from 5 states showed up,
riding everything from monster BMWs to itty-bitty XRs to almost-legal
2-strokes.  And though it's not an "official" (as if anything could be
official with this crowd) rec.moto event, the vintage motorcycle races
in Steamboat Springs, Colorado always provides a good excuse for netters
to gather.  There's also been the occasional Labor Day gather in Utah.
European Denizens have staged some gathers too.  (Your ad here,
reasonable rates!)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- 
Blaine Gardner @ Evans & Sutherland   580 Arapeen Drive, SLC, Utah 84108
       blgardne@javelin.sim.es.com     BIX: blaine_g@bix.com      FJ1200
Half of my vehicles and all of my computers are Kickstarted.      DoD#46
-- 
Blaine Gardner @ Evans & Sutherland   580 Arapeen Drive, SLC, Utah 84108
       blgardne@javelin.sim.es.com     BIX: blaine_g@bix.com      FJ1200
Half of my vehicles and all of my computers are Kickstarted.      DoD#46

File 44/1144: Announcing the Motif++ mailing list (88.0%)


I am glad and proud to announce the new mailing-list for the PD Motif C++
bindings. I got over 40 replies in about one week of people interested in
such a list, and the software has now been properly installed, so the list
is now up and running. For those interested in joining, please send e-mail
to that extend to 'motif++-request@cv.ruu.nl' or 'rvloon@cv.ruu.nl'.

The blurb everyone who joins gets follows, as well as the original 
announcement for where Motif++ can be obtained.

Enjoy!

8< - 8< -


Welcome to the Motif++ Mailing List!

The Motif++ mailing list is a mailing list dedicated to Motif++, the PD C++
wrapper library for Motif, where people can ask questions about Motif++, 
swap stories, and give new ideas about new directions and improvements for the 
bindings. 

All requests of an administrative nature, like subscription, removal, etc.
should be directed to motif++-request@cv.ruu.nl

All e-mail sent to motif++@cv.ruu.nl will be sent to the entire list, so
please make sure when using 'vacation' type programs that will reply to
messages automatically, that the address for the mailing-list is excluded 
from auto-replies.

Enjoy!

Ronald van Loon     | In theory, there is no difference 
(rvloon@cv.ruu.nl)  | between theory and practice.
3DCV Group, Utrecht |   
The Netherlands     | In practice however, there is.

8< - 8< -

Hello Motif World,

over the past half year there have been a lot of relatively minor changes to
the Motif++ bindings. Imake support has been improved, a few defaults have
been changed, and a lot of other small things have been added.

This is basically a release which drops the 'gamma' status. Next release will
incorporate some improvements by Stefan Schwarz, and possibly will support
X11R5 and Motif 1.2.x.

Note to all of those who keep copies of the archive: please retrieve this
distribution (during off-peak hours), and delete all previous copies.

Here is the original ANNOUNCEMENT:

HISTORY

The University of Lowell, supported by a grant of the Open Software Foundation,
has developed a wrapper-library, that encapsulates Motif widgets in C++
classes. All resources of these Widgets can now be set through
member-functions, while objects can be used in callback-functions. The library
was made available for free or nominal cost for anonymous ftp at 129.63.1.1.
However, the library contained a large number of bugs and oversights, and only
worked under X11R3. Due to lack of subsequent fundings, the bindings are no
longer actively supported by the University of Lowell.

I, Ronald van Loon, at a certain point last year, have taken the Lowell 
bindings, fixing the bugs I came across, adding missing memberfunctions, and
enhancing functionality and made the bug-fixed library available for the
general public for anonymous ftp (made possible by Rick Murphy at DEC).

NEW RELEASE

I am now pleased to announce a new and updated release of the Motif++
bindings. 

This release offers:

- Full Motif1.1 and X11R4 support
- Support for Xbae widgetset 
- Two additional widgets, written by myself, that can be used to indicate
  progress in an application.
- Imake support. NB: this release relies heavily on the existence of imake
		     and its config files on your site. I have tried to
		     provide the bindings with a standard Makefile, tweakable
		     for those unfortunates without imake. I have not severely
		     tested the standard Makefile though. Contact me if you
		     have problems. The reason for calling this a gamma
		     release lies in the fact that I do not have a multitude
		     of platforms to test the Imake-files on.
- Lots of testfiles (even somewhat useful programs)
- An article I wrote on the usage of Motif, X and C++, previously posted
  on Usenet.

WHERE TO GET THE NEW MOTIF BINDINGS


Anonymous ftp at decuac.dec.com (192.5.214.1), directory /pub/X11.


Please be patient as the network link is quite slow. Please do not FTP large
files during working hours.

Also note that there is also a motif++.31.jan.92.tar.Z file at this site; this
is an old version of the bindings.


Those who don't have ftp can send me e-mail, and I will send the bindings by
e-mail.

REQUEST

Those who use the bindings and find bugs, or see room for improvement, please
contact me, and I will try to incorporate them in a future release (in case of
bugs, a bug-fix of course ;-). 

MORE INFORMATION 

Contact me at "rvloon@cv.ruu.nl".
If you are desperate, then you can call me at
+31 30 506711 (that is Utrecht, the Netherlands; those within the Netherlands
call 030-506711).

Enjoy!

-- 
Ronald van Loon     | In theory, there is no difference 
(rvloon@cv.ruu.nl)  | between theory and practice.
3DCV Group, Utrecht |   
The Netherlands     | In practice however, there is.

File 45/1144: Re: Date is stuck (91.8%)


Directory PD1:
 Filename   Type Length   Date    Description
==============================================
CLKDEV14.ZIP  B   37122  910729  Keep DOS time in synch with battery clock chip

An index of all files in the WSMR-SIMTEL20.Army.Mil MS-DOS collection
is available in two formats:

Directory PD1:
 Filename   Type  Description
==============================================
SIMIBM.ZIP    B   Comma-delim list of all MSDOS files w/descrip.
SIMLIST.ZIP   B   Text format list of all MSDOS files w/descrip.

These files are updated every 7-10 days.  See AAAREAD.ME in that
directory for details. 

SIMTEL20 allows only nine ANONYMOUS FTP logins during weekday
prime time, 5am to 3pm Mountain Time (GMT-7), but 27 otherwise.

SIMTEL20 files are also available by anonymous ftp from mirror sites
OAK.Oakland.Edu (141.210.10.117), wuarchive.wustl.edu (128.252.135.4),
archive.orst.edu (128.193.2.13), ftp.uu.net (137.39.1.9), nic.funet.fi
(128.214.6.100), src.doc.ic.ac.uk (146.169.3.7), nic.switch.ch
(130.59.1.40), archie.au (139.130.4.6), NCTUCCCA.edu.tw (140.111.3.21),
by e-mail through the BITNET/EARN file servers, or by uucp from UUNET's
1-900-GOT-SRCS.  See UUNET file uunet!~/info/archive-help for details.

OAK.Oakland.Edu is the primary mirror site for WSMR-SIMTEL20.Army.Mil.
All other mirrors (except wuarchive) and all LISTSERV and TRICKLE
servers get their SIMTEL20 files from OAK instead of SIMTEL20 because
it is much faster and allows more simultaneous ftp connections.  OAK is
always "in sync" with SIMTEL20 because I maintain it, in addition to my
duties at SIMTEL20.  I run OAK's mirror program whenever new files are
added at SIMTEL20.

MSDOS-Ann@TACOM-EMH1.Army.Mil is a ONE-WAY (moderated) mailing list
which is used by the Internet MS-DOS archive managers to announce new
additions to their collections. 

The announcements posted to this mailing list are also posted to Usenet
newsgroup comp.archives.msdos.announce.  If your host has Usenet News
please do not subscribe to MSDOS-Ann.

To add yourself to the mailing list send e-mail to
listserv@TACOM-EMH1.Army.Mil with this command in the
body of the message:

    subscribe msdos-ann

To subscribe something other than the account the mail is coming from,
such as a local redistribution list, then add that address to the
"subscribe" command; for example, to subscribe "local-msdos-ann":

    subscribe local-msdos-ann@your.domain.net msdos-ann

Please do not include a signature because it may confuse the server.
Send mail with the word  help  in the body of the message to get a
complete list of commands and their syntax.

If you later change your mind and wish to unsubscribe, send e-mail
from the same address where you were when you subscribed.  Send to
listserv@TACOM-EMH1.Army.Mil with this command in the body of the
message:

unsubscribe msdos-ann

This server is only for mailing lists and information files.  It will
not send program files. 

Keith
--
Keith Petersen
Maintainer of the MS-DOS archive at WSMR-SIMTEL20.Army.Mil [192.88.110.20]

File 46/1144: Re: Save my hard disk?! (allocation error, cross-linked) (87.2%)




 Brad Banko writes:
>While running the MS Quick C compiler in a DOS window under Windows 3.1 
>this evening, I got a "program has violated system integrity... close all 
>applications, exit windows and restart your computer" error.

Gawd, I love Windows :-)

>1)  Is there an easy way to restore everything to working order?
>What might be some better approaches?

You'll probably want to delete any damaged executables and reload them
fresh.  Data files should be examined and repaired.

>2)  What might have caused this?  Does the SMARTDRV cache make me more
>vulnerable?  (I'm suspicious of hard drive caches especially when they
>cache data writing.)

You're not stupid.  Smartdrive caches things, and Windows also runs a
swap file which may contain data also.  All of this is pretty risky
stuff in a PC environment.

>The straightforward approach would be to run chkdsk with the /f option to 
>fix the disk and then it looks like I would probably have to reinstall Windows
>and a few other things.

A reasonably accurate prediction...


Here's a brief description of how DOS stores files:

There are three pieces to a file.  The directory entry, the FAT chain,
and the data area.  You can think of these as a sheet of lined
notebook paper, a sheet of graph paper, and a stack of 3X5 cards.

The directory entry (notebook paper) holds the file name, actual size,
and first cluster number.  It also holds some other information that's not
important right now.

The File Allocation Table (FAT) chain (graph paper) tells where to find
the actual data.  Each square of graph paper holds a number.  If the
number is zero, the cluster associated with this box is available.  If it
holds a "magic" number, it is either the last piece of a file or a bad
(unuseable) spot on the disk.  Any other number tells which cluster
contains the next section of the file.

The data area (3X5 cards) is where the actual information is stored.
The data area is organized as clusters of a fixed size; storage is
doled out in "chunks" of one cluster each.  (In your case, one cluster
is 2048 bytes.)  As a cluster is filled, another is allocated.

To read a file, you first look at the directory entry to get the
starting cluster number.  Now you read the data from that cluster.
Next, look at the FAT entry for the cluster you just read.  This will
tell you the cluster number for the next chunk of the file.
Naturally, these numbers are usually sequential, but they can jump
around and even go backwards.  Continue reading, one cluster at a
time, as you walk this chain through the FAT, until you hit the marker
which says it's the last cluster in the file.

CHKDSK is the DOS utility that checks the sanity and coherence of
the directories and the FAT and can bludgeon most flaws into
submission.  It doesn't have any intelligence, so you have to
double-check anything it "fixes".

Now let's do a bit of a post-mortem:

>C:\GFX\VPIC46\CVPIC.EXE
>C:\GFX\VPIC46\VPIC.TXT
>C:\GFX\VPIC46\VIDEO7.CFG
>C:\GFX\VPIC46\ORCPRO2.CFG
>C:\GFX\VPIC46\VGA.CFG
>C:\GAME\GOOSE\BIRD2.X
>C:\WINMISC\ADV21\WINADV.EXE
>   Allocation error, size adjusted

All of these files have sizes (according to the FAT) which don't match
the size reported in their directory entries.  CHKDSK /F will alter
the directory entries to match the FAT size.  (In other words,   the
directory entry for CVPIC.EXE may say the file is 64,877 bytes long.
But CHKDSK found a FAT chain of 43 clusters attached to it.  (My numbers,
obviously, are made up.))

>   316 lost allocation units found in 224 chains.
>    647168 bytes disk space would be freed

Disk space was found which is allocated in the FAT, but is not attached
to any directory entry.  CHKDSK /F gives you the option of converting these
"lost chains" to files.  You can then examine the files (FILE0000.CHK
through FILE0223.CHK) and rename or discard them.  Or, if you tell
CHKDSK _not_ to convert them to files, then those clusters will simply
be marked "available" in the FAT.


>C:\GFX\VPIC46\CVPIC.EXE
>   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16133

...

>C:\386SPART.PAR
>   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16133

These files are both referencing the _same_ data cluster.  Obviously,
one of them (at least) must be wrong.  It's interesting to note that

To fix this, you should copy each cross-linked file to a new name.
This will "fix" the cross-link by giving the files unique data spaces.
Now delete the cross-linked files.  Examine the copies and try to
assemble them properly.  Good luck.  (Hint:  "Missing pieces" are
likely to be found in those "lost chains" at the top...)

>  42366976 bytes total disk space
>   3958784 bytes in 4 hidden files
>    153600 bytes in 67 directories
>  36042752 bytes in 1496 user files
>   1564672 bytes available on disk

Your disk is pretty close to full.  This may be the actual cause of
the problem; perhaps Windows needed to expand its swapfile by an
amount which exceeded available disk space...

In any case, the short summary is that something trashed your FAT.
There are utilities that can mirror your FAT and help repair damage
after something like this, but you have to run them _before_ the
problem occurs.  Sorry.


-- 
----------------------------------------------------
Gordon S. Hlavenka           cgordon@vpnet.chi.il.us
Vote straight ticket Procrastination party Dec. 3rd!
-- 
----------------------------------------------------
Gordon S. Hlavenka           cgordon@vpnet.chi.il.us
Vote straight ticket Procrastination party Dec. 3rd!

File 47/1144: TCP/IP through Windows 3.1 (91.4%)


I don't know much about computers, so please bear with me. Here's my question:

         university mainframe (an IBM 3090 running VMS/MVS), and log on to my
         account. When I installed SLIP on my computer, I had to configure it
         for my modem (14.4 kbs Etronics internal) and had to supply the phone
         number to dial to reach the mainframe. The way it works now is that
         I type "telnet uicvm" or "tn3270 uicvm" (either will work) at the DOS
         prompt. UICVM is the node name of the mainframe. The program then
         dials the mainframe, establishes a protocol, and gives me the logon
         screen. "TELNET" and "TN3270" are the names of batch files in my SLIP
         directory. I have been told that a kermit protocol is used for the
         session.

         hardly ever use DOS directly. SLIP will not run under Windows. I
         talked to the people at our computer center, and they suggested that
         I use a packet driver called WINPKT.COM with SLIP. They gave me
         instructions on how to load it before I start Windows, and how to
         modify the TCPSTART and TCPSTOP batch files (in the SLIP directory)
         to ensure that it would work. I did all that and I could run SLIP
         from Windows, but there were other problems. For one thing, SLIP
         would not hang up the phone when I exited. I had to run my communi-
         cations program to hang up the phone or reboot the computer when
         that didn't work. For another, there were too many errors. It often
         took me 3-4 tries to connect to the mainframe. Our computer center
         does not support SLIP under Windows, so I can't keep going back to
         them with more questions.

         and do what SLIP is supposed to do? I need a package that is not too
         expensive, which is why I am looking for shareware. I have heard that
         there are regular commercial packages that do all this, but they cost
         hundreds of dollars. These are the main requirements:

         1. Must be able to run under Windows 3.1
         2. Must allow VT100 and IBM TN3270 terminal emulation
         3. Must allow ftp file transfers, since that's the only kind the
            mainframe allows. No Y-modem or Z-modem etc. I believe the ftp
            transfers are made through a kermit protocol, but I'm hazy about
            that.

         A subsidiary feature (that would be nice to have) if it's a true
         Windows program (rather than a DOS program modified to run under
         Windows) is the ability to run the session in a window concurrently
         with other applications and to cut and paste between the telnet
         session and other applications.

Any information received is appreciated.

Pankaj Saxena
u09416@uicvm.uic.edu

File 48/1144: Re: Help viewing Voyager CD ROMs on Mac (91.3%)


>Two and a half years ago I purchased a set of CD ROMs from the
>University of Colorado Lab for Atmos. and Space Physics.  They
>were Space Sciences Sampler and Voyagers to the Outer Planets.
>...
>With Pixel Pusher we could never get past messages something like
>This file has no PDS label, please fill in the following info
>(a bunch of slots with most zeros).  Yet, we could open the
>image file in Word and see the label file at the beginning.

The compressed image format used for the Voyager disks is not (yet)
supported by any Macintosh display software that I know of. However,
there does exist a program that can convert the images to a format that
is recognized by recent versions of both Pixel Pusher and NIH/Image. It
is called "PDS Decompress" and is available via anonymous ftp from the
"pub" directory on "delcano.mit.edu" [18.75.0.80]. This is a Binhex/
Stuffit archive and contains the application itself, Think-C source,
and a very brief description.

The most recent version of NIH/Image (1.48) may be down-loaded from
"starhawk.jpl.nasa.gov", where it is located in "image148.hqx" in the
"pub" directory. This archive also contains source code, but not the
documentation, which is located in the "image1455.hqx" archive in the
same directory.

Regards,
Peter G. Ford
Manager, Microwave SubNode
NASA Planetary Data System

File 49/1144: Save my hard disk?! (allocation error, cross-linked) (88.9%)


Hi.

While running the MS Quick C compiler in a DOS window under Windows 3.1 
this evening, I got a "program has violated system integrity... close all 
applications, exit windows and restart your computer" error.

I started to do this when I immediately got a "Serious disk error" message
from Windows.  "hit return to retry".  I did that about 5 times and then
rebooted to find that quite a few files have been corrupted somehow.
(I am including the chkdsk output below.)


1)  Is there an easy way to restore everything to working order?
What might be some better approaches?

2)  What might have caused this?  Does the SMARTDRV cache make me more
vulnerable?  (I'm suspicious of hard drive caches especially when they
cache data writing.)

The straightforward approach would be to run chkdsk with the /f option to 
fix the disk and then it looks like I would probably have to reinstall Windows
and a few other things.

Thanks for your comments and suggestions.

Brad Banko

ps:  this is a 386sx machine with a 40Mb hard drive and 2 Mb of RAM.


chkdsk output:
======================================================================
Volume Serial Number is 1159-09D3
Errors found, F parameter not specified
Corrections will not be written to disk

   Allocation error, size adjusted
   Allocation error, size adjusted
   Allocation error, size adjusted
   Allocation error, size adjusted
   Allocation error, size adjusted
   Allocation error, size adjusted
   Allocation error, size adjusted

   316 lost allocation units found in 224 chains.
    647168 bytes disk space would be freed

   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16133
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16138
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16139
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16140
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16141
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16146
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16151
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16152
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16153
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16154
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16155
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16156
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16157
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16208
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16184
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16185
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16186
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16187
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16188
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16189
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16190
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16191
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16199
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16201
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16382
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16380
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16367
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16341
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16151
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16257
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16339
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16184
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16201
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16257
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16265
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16275
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16339
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16133
   Is cross linked on allocation unit 16146

  42366976 bytes total disk space
   3958784 bytes in 4 hidden files
    153600 bytes in 67 directories
  36042752 bytes in 1496 user files
   1564672 bytes available on disk

      2048 bytes in each allocation unit
     20687 total allocation units on disk
       764 available allocation units on disk

    655360 total bytes memory
    579712 bytes free
-- 
Brad Banko;  Dept of Physics;  U of Illinois;  b-banko@uiuc.edu
=========================================================================
See one.  Do one.  Teach one.			73 de kb8cne @ n9lnq.il

File 50/1144: 10th International Obfuscated C Code Contest Opening (part 2 of 2) (84.4%)


Enclosed are the rules, guidelines and related information for the 10th
International Obfuscated C Code Contest.  (This is part 2 of a 2 part
shar file).

Enjoy!

chongo  /\oo/\
Larry Bassel

=-=

#!/bin/sh
# This is part 02 of a multipart archive
# ============= mkentry.c ==============
echo "x - extracting mkentry.c (Text)"
sed 's/^X//' << 'SHAR_EOF' > mkentry.c &&
X/* @(#)mkentry.c	1.24 3/1/93 02:28:49 */
X/*
X * Copyright (c) Landon Curt Noll & Larry Bassel, 1993.  
X * All Rights Reserved.  Permission for personal, education or non-profit use 
X * is granted provided this this copyright and notice are included in its 
X * entirety and remains unaltered.  All other uses must receive prior 
X * permission in writing from both Landon Curt Noll and Larry Bassel.
X */
X/*
X * mkentry - make an International Obfuscated C Code Contest entry
X *
X * usage:
X *	mkentry -r remarks -b build -p prog.c -o ioccc.entry
X *
X *	-r remarks		file with remarks about the entry
X *	-b build		file containing how prog.c should be built
X *	-p prog.c		the obfuscated program source file
X *	-o ioccc.entry		ioccc entry output file
X *
X * compile by:
X *	cc mkentry.c -o mkentry
X */
X/*
X * Placed in the public domain by Landon Curt Noll, 1992.
X *
X * THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS'' AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
X * WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
X * MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
X */
X/*
X * WARNING:
X *
X * This program attempts to implement the IOCCC rules.  Every attempt
X * has been made to make sure that this program produces an entry that
X * conforms to the contest rules.  In all cases, where this program
X * differs from the contest rules, the contest rules will be used.  Be
X * sure to check with the contest rules before submitting an entry.
X *
X * Send questions or comments (but not entries) about the contest, to:
X *
X *	...!{sun,pacbell,uunet,pyramid}!hoptoad!judges
X *	judges@toad.com
X * The rules and the guidelines may (and often do) change from year to
X * year.  You should be sure you have the current rules and guidelines
X * prior to submitting entries.  To obtain all 3 of them, send Email
X * to the address above and use the subject 'send rules'.
X *
X * Because contest rules change from year to year, one should only use this
X * program for the year that it was intended.  Be sure that the RULE_YEAR
X * define below matches this current year.
X */
X
X#include 
X#include 
X#include 
X#include 
X#include 
X
X/* logic */
X#ifndef TRUE
X# define TRUE 1
X#endif /* TRUE */
X#ifndef FALSE
X# define FALSE 0
X#endif /* FALSE */
X#define EOF_OK TRUE
X#define EOF_NOT_OK FALSE
X
X/* global limits */
X#define RULE_YEAR 1993		/* NOTE: should match the current year */
X#define START_DATE "1Mar92 0:00 UTC"	/* first confirmation received */
X#define MAX_COL 79		/* max column a line should hit */
X#define MAX_BUILD_SIZE 256	/* max how to build size */
X#define MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE 3217	/* max program source size */
X#define MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE2 1536	/* max program source size not counting
X				   whitespace and {}; not followed by
X				   whitespace or EOF */
X#define MAX_TITLE_LEN 12	/* max chars in the title */
X#define MAX_ENTRY_LEN 1		/* max length in the entry input line */
X#define MAX_ENTRY 8		/* max number of entries per person per year */
X#define MAX_FILE_LEN 1024	/* max filename length for a info file */
X
X/* where to send entries */
X#define ENTRY_ADDR1 "...!{apple,pyramid,sun,uunet}!hoptoad!obfuscate"
X#define ENTRY_ADDR2 "obfuscate@toad.com"
X
X/* uuencode process - assumes ASCII */
X#define UUENCODE(c) (encode_str[(int)(c)&0xff])
X#define UUENCODE_LEN 45		/* max uuencode chunk size */
X#define UUINFO_MODE 0444	/* mode of an info file's uuencode file */
X#define UUBUILD_MODE 0444	/* mode of the build file's uuencode file */
X#define UUBUILD_NAME "build"	/* name for the build file's uuencode file */
X#define UUPROG_MODE 0444	/* mode of the program's uuencode file */
X#define UUPROG_NAME "prog.c"	/* name for the program's uuencode file */
X
X/* encode_str[(char)val] is the uuencoded character of val */
Xchar encode_str[256+1] = "`!\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_ !\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_ !\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_ !\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_";
X
X/* global declarations */
Xchar *program;			/* our name */
Xlong start_time;		/* the startup time */
X
X/* forward declarations */
Xvoid parse_args();
Xvoid usage();
XFILE *open_remark();
XFILE *open_build();
XFILE *open_program();
XFILE *open_output();
Xvoid output_entry();
Xvoid output_remark();
Xvoid output_author();
Xvoid output_info();
Xvoid output_build();
Xvoid output_program();
Xvoid output_end();
Xint get_line();
Xvoid output_till_dot();
Xint col_len();
Xvoid check_io();
Xvoid uuencode();
X
Xmain(argc, argv)
X    int argc;		/* arg count */
X    char **argv;	/* the args */
X{
X    FILE *remark=NULL;	/* open remarks stream */
X    FILE *build=NULL;	/* open build file stream */
X    FILE *prog=NULL;	/* open program stream */
X    FILE *output=NULL;	/* open output stream */
X    char *rname=NULL;	/* file with remarks about the entry */
X    char *bname=NULL;	/* file containing how prog.c should be built */
X    char *pname=NULL;	/* the obfuscated program source file */
X    char *oname=NULL;	/* ioccc entry output file */
X    struct tm *tm;	/* startup time structure */
X
X    /*
X     * check on the year
X     */
X    start_time = time((long *)0);
X    tm = gmtime(&start_time);
X    if (tm->tm_year != RULE_YEAR-1900) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	"%s: WARNING: this program applies to %d, which may differ from %d\n\n",
X	    argv[0], RULE_YEAR, 1900+tm->tm_year);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * parse the command line args
X     */
X    parse_args(argc, argv, &rname, &bname, &pname, &oname);
X
X    /*
X     * open/check the input and output files
X     *
X     * We open and truncate the output file first, in case it is the same
X     * as one of the input files.
X     */
X    output = open_output(oname);
X    remark = open_remark(rname);
X    build = open_build(bname);
X    prog = open_program(pname);
X    if (output==NULL || remark==NULL || build==NULL || prog==NULL) {
X	exit(1);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * output each section
X     */
X    output_entry(output, oname);
X    output_remark(output, oname, remark, rname);
X    output_author(output, oname);
X    output_info(output, oname);
X    output_build(output, oname, build, bname);
X    output_program(output, oname, prog, pname);
X    output_end(output, oname);
X
X    /* 
X     * flush the output 
X     */
X    if (fflush(output) == EOF) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: flush error in %s: ", program, oname);
X	perror("");
X	exit(2);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * final words
X     */
X    printf("\nYour entry can be found in %s.  You should check this file\n", 
X	oname);
X    printf("correct any problems and verify that the uudecode utility will\n");
X    printf("correctly decode your build file and program.\n\n");
X    printf("This program has been provided as a guide for submitters.  In\n");
X    printf("cases where it conflicts with the rules, the rules shall apply.\n");
X    printf("It is your responsibility to ensure that your entry conforms to\n");
X    printf("the current rules.\n\n");
X    printf("Email your entries to:\n");
X    printf("\t%s\n", ENTRY_ADDR1);
X    printf("\t%s\n\n", ENTRY_ADDR2);
X    printf("Please use the following subject when you Email your entry:\n");
X    printf("\tioccc entry\n\n");
X    /* all done */
X    exit(0);
X}
X
X/*
X * parse_args - parse the command line args
X *
X * Given the command line args, this function parses them and sets the
X * required name flags.  This function will return only if the command
X * line syntax is correct.
X */
Xvoid
Xparse_args(argc, argv, rname, bname, pname, oname)
X    int argc;		/* arg count */
X    char **argv;	/* the args */
X    char **rname;	/* file with remarks about the entry */
X    char **bname;	/* file containing how prog.c should be built */
X    char **pname;	/* the obfuscated program source file */
X    char **oname;	/* ioccc entry output file */
X{
X    char *optarg;	/* -flag option operand */
X    int flagname;	/* the name of the -flag */
X    int i;
X
X    /*
X     * Not everyone has getopt, so we must parse args by hand.
X     */
X    program = argv[0];
X    for (i=1; i < argc; ++i) {
X
X	/* determine the flagname */
X	if (argv[i][0] != '-') {
X	    usage(1);
X	    /*NOTREACHED*/
X	}
X	flagname = (int)argv[i][1];
X
X	/* determine the flag's operand */
X	if (flagname != '\0' && argv[i][2] != '\0') {
X	    optarg = &argv[i][2];
X	} else {
X	    if (i+1 >= argc) {
X		usage(2);
X		/*NOTREACHED*/
X	    } else {
X		optarg = argv[++i];
X	    }
X	}
X
X	/* save the flag's operand in the correct global variable */
X	switch (flagname) {
X	case 'r':
X	    *rname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	case 'b':
X	    *bname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	case 'p':
X	    *pname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	case 'o':
X	    *oname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	default:
X	    usage(3);
X	    /*NOTREACHED*/
X	}
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * verify that we have all of the required flags
X     */
X    if (*rname == NULL || *bname == NULL || *pname == NULL || *oname == NULL) {
X	usage(4);
X	/*NOTREACHED*/
X    }
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * usage - print a usage message and exit
X *
X * This function does not return.
X */
Xvoid
Xusage(exitval)
X    int exitval;		/* exit with this value */
X{
X    fprintf(stderr,
X	"usage: %s -r remarks -b build -p prog.c -o ioccc.entry\n\n", program);
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-r remarks\tfile with remarks about the entry\n");
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-b build\tfile containing how prog.c should be built\n");
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-p prog.c\tthe obfuscated program source file\n");
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-o ioccc.entry\tioccc entry output file\n");
X    exit(exitval);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_remark - open/check the remark file
X *
X * The remark file should be indented by 4 spaces, and should not extend 
X * beyond column MAX_COL.  These are not requirements, so we only warn.
X *
X * This function returns NULL on I/O or format error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_remark(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X    char buf[BUFSIZ+1];		/* input buffer */
X    int toolong=0;		/* number of lines that are too long */
X    int non_indent=0;		/* number of lines not indented by 4 spaces */
X
X    /*
X     * open the remark input file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "r");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open remark file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * look at each line
X     */
X    while (fgets(buf, BUFSIZ, stream) != NULL) {
X
X	/* count lines that do not start with 4 spaces */
X	if (buf[0] != '\n' && strncmp(buf, "    ", 4) != 0) {
X	    ++non_indent;
X	}
X
X	/* count long lines */
X	if (col_len(buf) > MAX_COL) {
X	    /* found a line that is too long */
X	    ++toolong;
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* watch for I/O errors */
X    check_io(stream, filename, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* note long lines if needed */
X    if (toolong > 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: WARNING: %d line(s) from %s extend beyond the 80th column\n",
X	    program, toolong, filename);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:          This is ok, but it would be nice to avoid\n\n",
X	    program);
X    }
X
X    /* note non-indented lines, if needed */
X    if (non_indent > 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: WARNING: %d line(s) from %s are not indented by 4 spaces\n",
X	    program, non_indent, filename);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:          This is ok, but it would be nice to avoid\n\n",
X	    program);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    rewind(stream);
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_build - open/check the build file
X *
X * The how to build file must not be longer than MAX_BUILD_SIZE bytes.
X *
X * This function returns NULL on I/O or size error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_build(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X    struct stat statbuf;	/* the status of the open file */
X
X    /*
X     * open the how to build input file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "r");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open how to build file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * determine the size of the file
X     */
X    if (fstat(fileno(stream), &statbuf) < 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot stat how to build file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X    if (statbuf.st_size > MAX_BUILD_SIZE) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: FATAL: the how to build file: %s, is %d bytes long\n",
X	    program, filename, statbuf.st_size);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        it may not be longer than %d bytes\n",
X	    program, MAX_BUILD_SIZE);
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_program - open/check the program source file
X *
X * The program source file must be <= 3217 bytes.  The number of
X * non-whitespace and }{; chars not followed by whitespace must
X * be <= 1536 bytes.
X *
X * This function returns NULL on I/O or size error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_program(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X    struct stat statbuf;	/* the status of the open file */
X    int count;			/* special count size */
X    int c;			/* the character read */
X
X    /*
X     * open the program source input file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "r");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open program source file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	exit(7);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * determine the size of the file
X     */
X    if (fstat(fileno(stream), &statbuf) < 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot stat program source file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X    if (statbuf.st_size > MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: FATAL: the program source file: %s, is %d bytes long\n",
X	    program, filename, statbuf.st_size);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        it may not be longer than %d bytes\n",
X	    program, MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE);
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * count the non-whitespace, non {}; followed by whitespace chars
X     */
X    count = 0;
X    c = 0;
X    while ((c=fgetc(stream)) != EOF) {
X	/* look at non-whitespace */
X	if (!isascii(c) || !isspace(c)) {
X	    switch (c) {
X	    case '{':		/* count if not followed by EOF or whitespace */
X	    case '}':
X	    case ';':
X		/* peek at next char */
X		c = fgetc(stream);
X		if (c != EOF && isascii(c) && !isspace(c)) {
X		    /* not followed by whitespace or EOF, count it */
X		    ungetc(c, stream);
X		    ++count;
X		}
X		break;
X	    default:
X		++count;
X		break;
X	    }
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* watch for I/O errors */
X    check_io(stream, filename, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* look at the special size */
X    if (count > MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE2) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: FATAL: the number of bytes that are non-whitespace, and\n",
X	    program);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        that are not '{', '}', ';' followed by whitespace\n",
X	    program);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        or EOF must be <= %d bytes\n",
X	    program, MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE2);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        in %s, %d bytes were found\n",
X	    program, filename, count);
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    rewind(stream);
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_output - open/check the entry output file
X *
X * This function returns NULL on open error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_output(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X
X    /*
X     * open the ioccc entry output file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "w");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open ioccc entry file for output: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	exit(8);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * output_entry - output the ---entry--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the entry section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_entry(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    char title[MAX_TITLE_LEN+1+1];	/* the entry's title */
X    char buf[MAX_COL+1+1];		/* I/O buffer */
X    int entry=0;			/* entry number */
X    int ret;				/* fields processed by fscanf */
X    int ok_line=0;			/* 0 => the line is not ok */
X    char skip;				/* input to skip */
X    FILE *date_pipe;			/* pipe to a date command */
X    time_t epoch_sec;			/* seconds since the epoch */
X    char *p;
X
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---entry---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the rule year
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "rule:\t%d\n", RULE_YEAR);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /* determine if this is a fix */
X    printf("Is this a fix, update or resubmittion to a ");
X    printf("previous entry (enter y or n)? ");
X    while (get_line(buf, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(buf[0]=='y' || buf[0]=='n')) {
X	printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X    }
X    if (buf[0] == 'y') {
X	fprintf(output, "fix:\ty\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X	printf("\nBe sure that the title and entry number that you give\n");
X	printf("are the same of as the entry you are replacing\n");
X    } else {
X	fprintf(output, "fix:\tn\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * write the title
X     */
X    printf("\nYour title must match expression be a [a-zA-Z0-9_=] character\n");
X    printf("followed by 0 to %d more [a-zA-Z0-9_=+-] characters.\n\n",
X	MAX_TITLE_LEN-1);
X    printf("It is suggested, but not required, that the title should\n");
X    printf("incorporate your username; in the\n");
X    printf("case of multiple authors, consider using parts of the usernames\n");
X    printf("of the authors.\n\n");
X    printf("enter your title: ");
X    do {
X	/* prompt and read a line */
X	if ((ok_line = get_line(title, MAX_TITLE_LEN+1, MAX_COL-9)) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\ntitle is too long, please re-enter: ");
X	    continue;
X	}
X
X	/* verify the pattern, not everyone has regexp, so do it by hand */
X	if (!isascii((int)title[0]) ||
X	    !(isalnum((int)title[0]) || title[0] == '_' || title[0] == '=')) {
X	    printf("\ninvalid first character in the title\n\n");
X	    printf("enter your title: ");
X	    ok_line = 0;
X	} else {
X	    for (p=(&title[1]); *p != '\0' && *p != '\n'; ++p) {
X		if (!isascii((int)*p) ||
X		    !(isalnum((int)*p) || 
X		      *p == '_' || *p == '=' || *p == '+' || *p == '-')) {
X		    printf("\ninvalid character in the title\n\n");
X		    printf("enter your title: ");
X		    ok_line = 0;
X		}
X	    }
X	}
X    } while (ok_line <= 0);
X    fprintf(output, "title:\t%s", title);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the entry number
X     */
X    printf("\nEach person may submit up to %d entries per year.\n\n",
X	MAX_ENTRY);
X    printf("enter an entry number from 0 to %d inclusive: ", MAX_ENTRY-1);
X    do {
X	/* get a valid input line */
X	fflush(stdout);
X	ret = fscanf(stdin, "%d[\n]", &entry);
X	check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X	/* skip over input until newline is found */
X	do {
X	    skip = fgetc(stdin);
X	    check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X	    if (skip != '\n') {
X		/* bad text in input, invalidate entry number */
X		entry = -1;
X	    }
X	} while (skip != '\n');
X
X	/* check if we have a number, and if it is in range */
X	if (ret != 1 || entry < 0 || entry > MAX_ENTRY-1) {
X	    printf(
X	      "\nThe entry number must be between 0 and %d inclusive\n\n",
X		MAX_ENTRY-1);
X	    printf("enter the entry number: ");
X	}
X    } while (ret != 1 || entry < 0 || entry > MAX_ENTRY-1);
X    fprintf(output, "entry:\t%d\n", entry);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the submission date
X     */
X    /* returns a newline */
X    epoch_sec = time(NULL);
X    fprintf(output, "date:\t%s", asctime(gmtime(&epoch_sec)));
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the OS/machine host information
X     */
X    printf(
X      "\nEnter the machine(s) and OS(s) under which your entry was tested.\n");
X    output_till_dot(output, oname, "host:");
X}
X
X/*
X * output_remark - output the ---remark--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the entry section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_remark(output, oname, remark, rname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    FILE *remark;		/* stream to the file containing remark text */
X    char *rname;		/* name of the remark file */
X{
X    char buf[BUFSIZ+1];		/* input/output buffer */
X
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---remark---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * copy the remark file to the section
X     */
X    while (fgets(buf, BUFSIZ, remark) != NULL) {
X	fputs(buf, output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X    check_io(remark, rname, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* be sure that the remark section ends with a newline */
X    if (buf[strlen(buf)-1] != '\n') {
X	fputc('\n', output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X}
X
X/*
X * output_author - output the ---author--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information from stdin, and write the author section.
X * If multiple authors exist, multiple author sections will be written.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_author(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    char buf[MAX_COL+1+1];	/* I/O buffer */
X    int more_auths;		/* TRUE => more authors to note */
X    int auth_cnt=0;		/* number of authors processed */
X
X    /*
X     * prompt the user for the author section
X     */
X    printf("\nEnter information about each author.  If your entry is after\n");
X    printf("%s and before the contest deadline, the judges\n", START_DATE);
X    printf("will attempt to Email back a confirmation to the first author\n");
X
X    /*
X     * place author information for each author in an individual section
X     */
X    do {
X
X	/* write the start of the section */
X	fprintf(output, "---author---\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* write the author */
X	printf("\nAuthor #%d name: ", ++auth_cnt);
X	while (get_line(buf, MAX_COL+1, MAX_COL-9) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nname too long, please re-enter: ");
X	}
X	fprintf(output, "name:\t%s", buf);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* write the organization */
X	printf("\nEnter the School/Company/Organization of author #%d\n",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	printf("\nAuthor #%d org: ", auth_cnt);
X	while (get_line(buf, MAX_COL+1, MAX_COL-9) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nline too long, please re-enter: ");
X	}
X	fprintf(output, "org:\t%s", buf);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* write the address */
X	printf(
X	    "\nEnter the postal address for author #%d.  Be sure to include\n",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	printf("your country and do not include your name.\n");
X	output_till_dot(output, oname, "addr:");
X
X	/* write the Email address */
X	printf(
X	    "\nEnter the Email address for author #%d.  Use an address from\n",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	printf(
X	    "a registered domain or well known site.  If you give several\n");
X	printf("forms, list them one per line.\n");
X	output_till_dot(output, oname, "email:");
X
X	/* write the anonymous status */
X	printf("\nShould author #%d remain anonymous (enter y or n)? ",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	while (get_line(buf, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(buf[0]=='y' || buf[0]=='n')) {
X	    printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X	}
X	fprintf(output, "anon:\t%s", buf);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* determine if there is another author */
X	printf("\nIs there another author (enter y or n)? ");
X	while (get_line(buf, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(buf[0]=='y' || buf[0]=='n')) {
X	    printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X	}
X	if (buf[0] == 'y') {
X	    more_auths = TRUE;
X	} else {
X	    more_auths = FALSE;
X	}
X    } while (more_auths == TRUE);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_info - output the ---info--- section(s)
X *
X * Read the needed information from stdin, and write the info section.
X * If multiple info files exist, multiple info sections will be written.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_info(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    char infoname[MAX_FILE_LEN+1];	/* filename buffer */
X    char yorn[1+1];		/* y or n answer */
X    char *uuname;		/* name to uuencode as */
X    FILE *infile;		/* info file stream */
X
X    /*
X     * prompt the user for info information
X     */
X    printf("\nInfo files should be used only to supplement your entry.\n");
X    printf("For example, info files may provide sample input or detailed\n");
X    printf("information about your entry.  Because they are supplemental,\n");
X    printf("the entry should not require them to exist.\n\n");
X
X    /*
X     * while there is another info file to save, uuencode it
X     */
X    printf("Do you have a info file to include (enter y or n)? ");
X    while (get_line(yorn, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(yorn[0]=='y' || yorn[0]=='n')) {
X	printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X    }
X    while (yorn[0] == 'y') {
X
X	/* read the filename */
X	printf("\nEnter the info filename: ");
X	while (get_line(infoname, MAX_FILE_LEN+1, 0) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nInfo filename too long, please re-enter: ");
X	}
X
X	/* compute the basename of the info filename */
X	/* remove the trailing newline */
X	uuname = &infoname[strlen(infoname)-1];
X	*uuname = '\0';
X	/* avoid rindex/shrrchr compat issues, do it by hand */
X	for (--uuname; uuname > infoname; --uuname) {
X	    if (*uuname == '/') {
X		++uuname;
X		break;
X	    }
X	}
X
X	/* attempt to open the info file */
X	infile = fopen(infoname, "r");
X	if (infile == NULL) {
X	    fprintf(stderr, "\n%s: cannot open info file: %s: ",
X		program, infoname);
X	    perror("");
X	    continue;
X	}
X
X	/*
X	 * write the start of the section
X	 */
X	fprintf(output, "---info---\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* uuencode the info file */
X	uuencode(output, oname, infile, infoname, UUINFO_MODE, uuname);
X
X	printf("\nDo you have another info file to include (enter y or n)? ");
X	while (get_line(yorn, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(yorn[0]=='y' || yorn[0]=='n')) {
X	    printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X	}
X    };
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_build - output the ---build--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information from stdin, and write the build section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_build(output, oname, build, bname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    FILE *build;		/* open build file stream */
X    char *bname;		/* name of the build file */
X{
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---build---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * uuencode the program file
X     */
X    uuencode(output, oname, build, bname, UUBUILD_MODE, UUBUILD_NAME);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_program - output the ---program--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the program section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_program(output, oname, prog, pname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    FILE *prog;			/* open program stream */
X    char *pname;		/* name of program file */
X{
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---program---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * uuencode the program file
X     */
X    uuencode(output, oname, prog, pname, UUPROG_MODE, UUPROG_NAME);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_end - output the ---end--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the 'end section'.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_end(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    /*
X     * write the final section terminator
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---end---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * get_line - get an answer from stdin
X *
X * This function will flush stdout, in case a prompt is pending, and
X * read in the answer.
X *
X * This function returns 0 if the line is too long, of the length of the
X * line (including the newline) of the line was ok.  This function does
X * not return if ERROR or EOF.
X */
Xint
Xget_line(buf, siz, maxcol)
X    char *buf;			/* input buffer */
X    int siz;			/* length of input, including the newline */
X    int maxcol;			/* max col allowed, 0 => disable check */
X{
X    int length;			/* the length of the input line */
X
X    /* flush terminal output */
X    fflush(stdout);
X
X    /* read the line */
X    if (fgets(buf, siz+1, stdin) == NULL) {
X	/* report the problem */
X	check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X
X    /* look for the newline */
X    length = strlen(buf);
X    if (buf[length-1] != '\n') {
X	int eatchar;		/* the char being eaten */
X
X	/* no newline found, line must be too long, eat the rest of the line */
X	do {
X	    eatchar = fgetc(stdin);
X	} while (eatchar != EOF && eatchar != '\n');
X	check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* report the situation */
X	return 0;
X    }
X
X    /* watch for long lines, if needed */
X    if (maxcol > 0 && (length > maxcol || col_len(buf) > maxcol)) {
X	/* report the situation */
X	return 0;
X    }
X
X    /* return length */
X    return length;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_till_dot - output a set of lines until '.' by itself is read
X *
X * This routine will read a set of lines until (but not including)
X * a single line with '.' is read.  The format of the output is:
X *
X *	leader:\tfirst line
X *	\tnext line
X *	\tnext line
X *	   ...
X *
X * This routine will not return if I/O error or EOF.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_till_dot(output, oname, leader)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    char *leader;		/* the lead text for the first line */
X{
X    char buf[BUFSIZ+1];		/* input buffer */
X    int count;			/* lines read */
X    int done=FALSE;		/* TRUE => finished reading input */
X
X    /* instruct the user on how to input */
X    printf("\nTo end input, enter a line with a single period.\n");
X
X    /* read lines until '.' or EOF */
X    count = 0;
X    while (!done) {
X	/* issue the prompt */
X	printf("%s\t", (count>0) ? "" : leader);
X	fflush(stdout);
X
X	/* get the line */
X	if (get_line(buf, BUFSIZ, MAX_COL-9) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nline too long, please re-enter:\n\t");
X	    continue;
X	}
X
X	/* note if '.' was read */
X	if (strcmp(buf, ".\n") == 0) {
X	    done = TRUE;
X	}
X
X	/* write line if we read something */
X	if (!done) {
X	    fprintf(output, "%s\t%s", (count++>0) ? "" : leader, buf);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* if no lines read, at least output something */
X    if (count <= 0) {
X	fprintf(output, "%s\t.\n", leader);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * col_len - determine the highest that a string would reach
X *
X * Given a string, this routine returns that a string would reach
X * if the string were printed at column 1.  Tab stops are assumed
X * to start at 9, 17, 25, 33, ...
X */
Xint
Xcol_len(string)
X    char *string;		/* the string to examine */
X{
X    int col;	/* current column */
X    char *p;	/* current char */
X
X    /* scan the string */
X    for (col=0, p=string; *p != '\0' && *p != '\n'; ++p) {
X	/* note the column shift */
X	col = (*p=='\t') ? 1+((col+8)/8*8) : col+1;
X    }
X    if (*p == '\n') {
X	--col;
X    }
X
X    /* return the highest column */
X    return col;
X}
X
X/*
X * check_io - check for EOF or I/O error on a stream
X *
X * Does not return if EOF or I/O error.
X */
Xvoid
Xcheck_io(stream, name, eof_ok)
X    FILE *stream;		/* the stream to check */
X    char *name;			/* the name of this stream */
X    int eof_ok;			/* EOF_OK or EOF_NOT_OK */
X{
X    /* test for I/O error */
X    if (ferror(stream)) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: error on %s: ", program, name);
X	perror("");
X	exit(1);
X
X    /* test for EOF */
X    } else if (eof_ok == EOF_NOT_OK && feof(stream)) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: EOF on %s\n", program, name);
X	exit(1);
X    }
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * uuencode - uuencode a file
X *
X * Perform the uuencoding process identical to the process performed
X * by the uuencode(1) utility.
X *
X * This routine implements the algorithm described in the uuencode(5)
X * 4.3BSD Reno man page.
X */
Xvoid
Xuuencode(output, oname, infile, iname, umode, uname)
X    FILE *output;		/* output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* output filename */
X    FILE *infile;		/* input file stream */
X    char *iname;		/* input filename */
X    int umode;			/* the mode to put on the uuencode file */
X    char *uname;		/* name to put on the uuencode file */
X{
X    char buf[UUENCODE_LEN+1];	/* the uuencode buffer */
X    int read_len;		/* actual number of chars read */
X    int val;			/* 6 bit chunk from buf */
X    char filler='\0';		/* filler uuencode pad text */
X    char *p;
X
X    /*
X     * output the initial uuencode header
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "begin %o %s\n", umode, uname);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * clear out the input buffer
X     */
X    for (p=buf; p < &buf[sizeof(buf)/sizeof(buf[0])]; ++p) {
X	*p = '\0';
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * We will process UUENCODE_LEN chars at a time, forming
X     * a single output line each time.
X     */
X    while ((read_len=fread(buf,sizeof(buf[0]),UUENCODE_LEN,infile)) > 0) {
X	
X	/*
X	 * the first character is the length character
X	 */
X	fputc(UUENCODE(read_len), output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/*
X	 * We will convert 24 bits at a time.  Thus we will convert
X	 * 3 sets of 8 bits into 4 sets of uuencoded 6 bits.
X	 */
X	for (p=buf; read_len>0; read_len-=3, p+=3) {
X
X	    /* bits 0 to 5 */
X	    val = (p[0]>>2)&0x3f;
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	    /* bits 6 to 11 */
X	    val = ((p[0]<<4)&0x30) | ((p[1]>>4)&0x0f);
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	    /* bits 12 to 17 */
X	    val = ((p[1]<<2)&0x3c) | ((p[2]>>6)&0x03);
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	    /* bits 18 to 23 */
X	    val = p[2]&0x3f;
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X	}
X
X	/* end of UUENCODE_LEN line */
X	fputc('\n', output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/*
X	 * clear out the input buffer  (don't depend on bzero() or memset())
X	 */
X	for (p=buf; p < &buf[sizeof(buf)/sizeof(buf[0])]; ++p) {
X	    *p = '\0';
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* check the last read on the input file */
X    check_io(infile, iname, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* write end of uuencode file */
X    fprintf(output, "%c\nend\n", UUENCODE(filler));
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X}
SHAR_EOF
chmod 0444 mkentry.c ||
echo "restore of mkentry.c failed"
set `wc -c mkentry.c`;Wc_c=$1
if test "$Wc_c" != "33961"; then
	echo original size 33961, current size $Wc_c
fi
# ============= obfuscate.info ==============
echo "x - extracting obfuscate.info (Text)"
sed 's/^X//' << 'SHAR_EOF' > obfuscate.info &&
X1993 Obfuscated contest information
X
XCopyright (c) Landon Curt Noll & Larry Bassel, 1993.  
XAll Rights Reserved.  Permission for personal, education or non-profit use is 
Xgranted provided this this copyright and notice are included in its entirety 
Xand remains unaltered.  All other uses must receive prior permission in writing 
Xfrom both Landon Curt Noll and Larry Bassel.
X
XThe International Obfuscated C Code Contest (IOCCC), in the sprit of
Xco-operation, is willing mention other programming contents, as space
Xpermits.  
X
XHow to have your contest included in this file:
X
X    If you wish the IOCCC judges to include your contest in this file,
X    send a request to:
X
X	judges@toad.com
X
X    We request that contest descriptions be limited to 50 lines and to
X    not exceed 2500 bytes.  We typically request that your contest
X    include a current description of the IOCCC.
X
X    In order to be included in this file for given year, we must
X    receive a current description no EARLIER than Jan 1 00:00:00 UTC and
X    no LATER than Feb 15 00:00:00 UTC.  Agreement to publish your
X    contest must also be obtained prior to Feb 15.  Annual contests
X    that fail to submit a new entry will be dropped from this file.
X
XOfficial Disclaimer:  (pardon the officialese)
X
X    The contents noted below, other than the IOCCC, are not affiliated 
X    with the IOCCC, nor are they endorsed by the IOCCC.  We reserve the 
X    right to refuse to print information about a given contest.
X
X    The information below was provided by the particular contest
X    organizer(s) and printed by permission.  Please contact the
X    contest organizer(s) directly regarding their contents.
X
XWith that official notice given, we present for your ENJOYMENT, the following
Xinformation about contents:
X
X---------------------------------------------------------------------------
X
X    10th International Obfuscated C Contest   
X    
X	"The original obfuscated contest"
X
X    Obfuscate:  tr.v.  -cated, -cating, -cates.  1. a.  To render obscure.
X                b.  To darken.  2. To confuse:  Their emotions obfuscated 
X		their judgment.  [LLat. obfuscare, to darken : ob(intensive) +
X                Lat. fuscare, to darken < fuscus, dark.] -obfuscation n.
X                obfuscatory adj.
X 
X    GOALS OF THE CONTEST:
X 
X        * To write the most Obscure/Obfuscated C program under the rules below.
X        * To show the importance of programming style, in an ironic way.
X        * To stress C compilers with unusual code.
X        * To illustrate some of the subtleties of the C language.
X        * To provide a safe forum for poor C code.  :-)
X 
X    The IOCCC is the grandfather of USENET programming contests.  Since
X    1984, this contest demonstrated that a program that mearly works
X    correctly is not sufficient.  The IOCCC has also done much to add
X    the arcane word 'obfuscated' back into the English language.
X    (see "The New Hacker's Dictionary" by Eric Raymond)
X 
X    You are strongly encouraged to read the new contest rules before
X    sending any entries.  The rules, and sometimes the contest Email
X    address itself, change over time.  A valid entry one year may
X    be rejected in a later year due to changes in the rules.  The typical
X    start date for contests is in early March.  Contest rules are normally not
X    finalized and posted until the beginning of the contest.  The typical 
X    closing date for contests are in early May.
X 
X    The contest rules are posted to comp.unix.wizards, comp.lang.c,
X    misc.misc, alt.sources and comp.sources.d.  If you do not have access 
X    to these groups, or if you missed the early March posting, you may 
X    request a copy from the judges, via Email, at;
X 
X        judges@toad.com   -or-   ...!{sun,uunet,utzoo,pyramid}!hoptoad!judges
X 
X    Previous contest winners are available via anonymous ftp from
X    ftp.uu.net under the directory /pub/ioccc.
X
X---------------------------------------------------------------------------
X
X    0th International Obfuscated Perl Contest
X	By: Landon Noll & Larry Wall
X
X    This content is being planned.  Someday when Landon & Larry are not too 
X    busy, they will actually get around to posting the first set of rules!
X
X    Landon says: "Yes, I know that I said we would have a contest in 1993,
X		  but other existing projects got in the way.  Hopefully
X		  something will be developed after Nov 1993."
X
X---------------------------------------------------------------------------
X
X                2nd International obFUsCaTeD POsTsCripT Contest
X                     Jonathan Monsarrat (jgm@cs.brown.edu)
X                         Alena Lacova (alena@nikhef.nl)
X
X    A  contest of  programming skills  and  knowledge, exclusively  for the
X    PostScript programming language. Its purpose:
X
X    * To spread knowledge of PostScript and its details.
X    * To applaud those with the best tricks.
X    * To prove  that humans can  beat those damnable  machine generators at
X      their own game by writing  the most obscure and mysterious PostScript
X      programs ever.
X
X    Winners will receive the fame and attention that goes with having their
X    program entry posted as a winner to programmers world-wide.
X
X    The 1993 contest rules and results are available by ftp as
X    ``wilma.cs.brown.edu:pub/postscript/obfuscated*.shar'', or individually
X    in the obfuscated directory. The judges will post the 1994 rules
X    in November to comp.lang.postscript on Usenet, and other places.
X    Send questions to jgm@cs.brown.edu.
X
X    Categories include: Best Obfuscated PostScript, Best Artwork,
X    Most Compact, Best Interactive Program, Most Useful, and
X    anything so unusual and creative that it deserves an award.
X
X    The judges will choose the winners of each category.
X
X    Alena Lacova  is a system  administrator at NIKHEF  (Institute for High
X    Energy and Nuclear  Physics) in the  Netherlands. She is  the author of
X    The PostScript Chaos  Programs, which draw  Julia sets, Mandelbrot sets
X    and other kinds of fractal functions.
X
X    Jonathan Monsarrat is a graduate  student from MIT and Brown University
X    in  the  U.S.A. He  is  the  FAQ maintainer  for  the  Usenet newsgroup
X    comp.lang.postscript and the author of The PostScript Zone and LameTeX.
X .
X
SHAR_EOF
chmod 0444 obfuscate.info ||
echo "restore of obfuscate.info failed"
set `wc -c obfuscate.info`;Wc_c=$1
if test "$Wc_c" != "6257"; then
	echo original size 6257, current size $Wc_c
fi
exit 0
-- 
Sunnyvale residents: Vote Landon Noll for Sunnyvale City Council seat 1.

File 51/1144: New Windows drivers for Cirrus GD5426 graphic cards! (88.1%)



I have uploaded the most recent Windows drivers for the Cirrus GD5426 
chip based display cards to the uploads directory at ftp.cica.indiana.edu
 (file is 5426dr13.zip). They're very recent, I downloaded them from the 
Cirrus BBS (570-226-2365) last night. If you are unable to get them there, 
email me and maybe I can upload them to some other sites as well.  
I have a local bus based card (VL24 Bitblaster from Micron) but I think 
the drivers work with ISA cards (or at least includes drivers for them).

I found the new drivers to be a significant improvement over the 1.2 version, 
improving my graphic winmarks (v3.11) by about 2 million (7.77 to 9.88) 
although this could be the result of intentional benchmark cheating on 
Cirrus's part but I don't think so.

From Steve Gibson's (columnist for Info World) graphic card comparisons 
(also found at the cica ftp site under the name winadv.zip) I extracted the 
following for the sake of comparison:

							Wintach
             		Winbn3.11	Word	Sprsht	Cad	Paint	Overall
Steve's system:
486/33 VLB:
ATI Graphics Ultra Pro	  9.33		10.34	 20.78	8.28	14.90	 13.58

my system -
486sx/33 VLB:
VL24 Bitblaster		  9.88		 8.65	 11.71	18.84	15.40	 13.65


Its no Viper, but I think its a hell of a deal at about a third of the cost of 
the ATI card and when compared to the other cards included in Gibson's review.

Micron system owner's, I would be interested to hear your opinions on the 
DTC 2270VL local bus disk controller. My system came with a Maxtor 7120 
drive (120 MB) and at first was only giving me disk winmarks of about 16 Kb/s, 
I am now at 22 Kb/s. Is this about as good as it gets? I can't get a Norton's
sysinfo disk reading because the contoller intercepts the calls, at 
least that was what the program said.


Oliver Weatherbee
oliver@earthview

File 52/1144: New Windows drivers for Cirrus GD5426 graphic cards (88.1%)



I have uploaded the most recent Windows drivers for the Cirrus GD5426 
chip based display cards to the uploads directory at ftp.cica.indiana.edu
 (file is 5426dr13.zip). They're very recent, I downloaded them from the 
Cirrus BBS (570-226-2365) last night. If you are unable to get them there, 
email me and maybe I can upload them to some other sites as well.  
I have a local bus based card (VL24 Bitblaster from Micron) but I think 
the drivers work with ISA cards (or at least includes drivers for them).

I found the new drivers to be a significant improvement over the 1.2 version, 
improving my graphic winmarks (v3.11) by about 2 million (7.77 to 9.88) 
although this could be the result of intentional benchmark cheating on 
Cirrus's part but I don't think so.

From Steve Gibson's (columnist for Info World) graphic card comparisons 
(also found at the cica ftp site under the name winadv.zip) I extracted the 
following for the sake of comparison:

							Wintach
             		Winbn3.11	Word	Sprsht	Cad	Paint	Overall
Steve's system:
486/33 VLB:
ATI Graphics Ultra Pro	  9.33		10.34	 20.78	8.28	14.90	 13.58

my system -
486sx/33 VLB:
VL24 Bitblaster		  9.88		 8.65	 11.71	18.84	15.40	 13.65


Its no Viper, but I think its a hell of a deal at about a third of the cost of 
the ATI card and when compared to the other cards included in Gibson's review.

Micron system owner's, I would be interested to hear your opinions on the 
DTC 2270VL local bus disk controller. My system came with a Maxtor 7120 
drive (120 MB) and at first was only giving me disk winmarks of about 16 Kb/s, 
I am now at 22 Kb/s. Is this about as good as it gets? I can't get a Norton's
sysinfo disk reading because the contoller intercepts the calls, at 
least that was what the program said.


Oliver Weatherbee
oliver@earthview

File 53/1144: Micron computer owners, please read! (88.1%)



I have uploaded the most recent Windows drivers for the Cirrus GD5426 
chip based display cards to the uploads directory at ftp.cica.indiana.edu
 (file is 5426dr13.zip). They're very recent, I downloaded them from the 
Cirrus BBS (570-226-2365) last night. If you are unable to get them there, 
email me and maybe I can upload them to some other sites as well.  
I have a local bus based card (VL24 Bitblaster from Micron) but I think 
the drivers work with ISA cards (or at least includes drivers for them).

I found the new drivers to be a significant improvement over the 1.2 version, 
improving my graphic winmarks (v3.11) by about 2 million (7.77 to 9.88) 
although this could be the result of intentional benchmark cheating on 
Cirrus's part but I don't think so.

From Steve Gibson's (columnist for Info World) graphic card comparisons 
(also found at the cica ftp site under the name winadv.zip) I extracted the 
following for the sake of comparison:

							Wintach
             		Winbn3.11	Word	Sprsht	Cad	Paint	Overall
Steve's system:
486/33 VLB:
ATI Graphics Ultra Pro	  9.33		10.34	 20.78	8.28	14.90	 13.58

my system -
486sx/33 VLB:
VL24 Bitblaster		  9.88		 8.65	 11.71	18.84	15.40	 13.65


Its no Viper, but I think its a hell of a deal at about a third of the cost of 
the ATI card and when compared to the other cards included in Gibson's review.

Micron system owner's, I would be interested to hear your opinions on the 
DTC 2270VL local bus disk controller. My system came with a Maxtor 7120 
drive (120 MB) and at first was only giving me disk winmarks of about 16 Kb/s, 
I am now at 22 Kb/s. Is this about as good as it gets? I can't get a Norton's
sysinfo disk reading because the contoller intercepts the calls, at 
least that was what the program said.


Oliver Weatherbee
oliver@earthview

File 54/1144: The OTIS Project (FTP sites for original art and images) (86.2%)



	-------------------------------------
	+ ............The OTIS Project '93  +      
	+ "The Operative Term Is STIMULATE" + 
	-------------------------------------
	---this file last updated..4-21-93---


WHAT IS OTIS?

OTIS is here for the purpose of distributing original artwork
and photographs over the network for public perusal, scrutiny,    
and distribution.  Digital immortality.

The basic idea behind "digital immortality" is that computer networks   
are here to stay and that anything interesting you deposit on them
will be around near-forever.  The GIFs and JPGs of today will be the
artifacts of a digital future.  Perhaps they'll be put in different
formats, perhaps only surviving on backup tapes....but they'll be
there...and someone will dig them up.  
 
If that doesn't interest you... OTIS also offers a forum for critique
and exhibition of your works....a virtual art gallery that never closes
and exists in an information dimension where your submissions will hang
as wallpaper on thousands of glowing monitors.  Suddenly, life is 
breathed into your work...and by merit of it's stimulus, it will 
travel the globe on pulses of light and electrons.
 
Spectators are welcome also, feel free to browse the gallery and 
let the artists know what you think of their efforts.  Keep your own
copies of the images to look at when you've got the gumption...
that's what they're here for.

---------------------------------------------------------------

WHERE?             

OTIS currently (as of 4/21/93) has two FTP sites.  
 
 	141.214.4.135 (projects/otis), the UWI site
		
	sunsite.unc.edu (/pub/multimedia/pictures/OTIS), the SUNsite 
	(you can also GOPHER to this site for OTIS as well)

Merely "anonymous FTP" to either site on Internet and change to the
appropriate directory.  Don't forget to get busy and use the "bin"
command to make sure you're in binary.

OTIS has also been spreading to some dial-up BBS systems around North
America....the following systems have a substancial supply of
OTIStuff...
	Underground Cafe (Omaha) (402.339.0179) 2 lines
	CyberDen (SanFran?) (415.472.5527)  Usenet Waffle-iron

--------------------------------------------------------------
 
HOW DO YOU CONTRIBUTE?
              
What happens is...you draw a pretty picture or take a lovely   
photo, get it scanned into an image file, then either FTP-put
it in the CONTRIB/Incoming directory or use UUENCODE to send it to me
(email addresses at eof) in email.  After the image is received,
it will be put into the correct directory.  Computer originated works
are also welcome.

OTIS' directories house two types of image files, GIF and JPG.  
GIF and JPG files require, oddly enough, a GIF or JPG viewer to 
see.  These viewers are available for all types of computers at 
most large FTP sites around Internet.  JPG viewers are a bit
tougher to find.  If you can't find one, but do have a GIF viewer,  
you can obtain a JPG-to-GIF conversion program which will change    
JPG files to a standard GIF format. 

OTIS also accepts animation files.      

When you submit image files, please send me email at the same time
stating information about what you uploaded and whether it is to be
used (in publications or other projects) or if it is merely for people
to view.  Also, include some biographical information on yourself, we'll
be having info-files on each contributing artist and their works.  You 
can also just upload a text-file of info about yourself (instead of 
emailing).

If you have pictures, but no scanner, there is hope.  Merely send
copies to:

The OTIS Project
c/o Ed Stastny
PO BX 241113
Omaha, NE 68124-1113

I will either scan them myself or get them to someone who will  
scan them.  Include an ample SASE if you want your stuff back.  
Also include information on each image, preferably a 1-3 line 
description of the image that we can include in the infofile in the
directory where it's finally put.  If you have preferences as to what
the images are to be named, include those as well.  
 
Conversely, if you have a scanner and would like to help out, please
contact me and we'll arrange things.

If you want to submit your works by disk, peachy.  Merely send a 3.5"
disk to the above address (Omaha) and a SASE if you want your disk back.
This is good for people who don't have direct access to encoders or FTP,
but do have access to a scanner.  We accept disks in either Mac or IBM
compatible format.  If possible, please submit image files as GIF or
JPG.  If you can't...we can convert from most formats...we'd just rather
not have to.

At senders request, we can also fill disks with as much OTIS as they
can stand.  Even if you don't have stuff to contribute, you can send
a blank disk and an SASE (or $2.50 for disk, postage and packing) to 
get a slab-o-OTIS.

As of 04/21/93, we're at about 18 megabytes of files, and growing.  
Email me for current archive size and directory.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

DISTRIBUTION?

The images distributed by the OTIS project may be distributed freely   
on the condition that the original filename is kept and that it is
not altered in any way (save to convert from one image format to
another).  In fact, we encourage files to be distributed to local 
bulletin boards and such.  If you could, please transport the
appropriate text files along with the images.  
 
It would also be nice if you'd send me a note when you did post images
from OTIS to your local bbs.  I just want to keep track of them so
participants can have some idea how widespread their stuff is.

It's the purpose of OTIS to get these images spread out as much as
possible.  If you have the time, please upload a few to your favorite
BBS system....or even just post this "info-file" there.  It would be
keen of you.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

USE?

If you want to use any of the works you find on the OTIS directory,
you'll have to check to see if permission has been granted and the 
stipulations of the permission (such as free copy of publication, or
full address credit).  You will either find this in the ".rm" file for    
the image or series of images...or in the "Artists" directory under the 
Artists name.  If permission isn't explicitly given, then you'll have 
to contact the artist to ask for it.  If no info is available, email
me (ed@cwis.unomaha.edu), and I'll get in contact with the artist for 
you, or give you their contact information.
 
When you DO use permitted work, it's always courteous to let the artist
know about it, perhaps even send them a free copy or some such
compensation for their files.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

NAMING IMAGES?

Please keep the names of your files in "dos" format.  That means, keep
the filename (before .jpg or .gif) to eight characters or less.  The way
I usually do it is to use the initials of the artist, plus a three or
four digit "code" for the series of images, plus the series number.
Thus, Leonardo DeVinci's fifth mechanical drawing would be something
like:
 
	ldmek5.gif     OR    ldmek5.jpg    OR    ldmech5.gif   ETC

Keeping the names under 8 characters assures that the filename will
remain intact on all systems.  


---------------------------------------------------------------------- 

CREATING IMAGE FILES?

When creating image files, be sure to at least include your name
somewhere on or below the picture.  This gives people a reference in
case they'd like to contact you.  You may also want to include a title,
address or other information you'd like people to know.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

HMMM?!

That's about it for now.  More "guidelines" will be added as needed.
Your input is expected.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 	     (a sumerian deity) or it's followers, be they pope, priest,
	     or ezine administrator.  We do take sacrifices and donations
	     however.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 	     image files.  The files will go to the public at large.  
	     It's possible, as with any form of mass-media, that someone
	     could unscrupulously use your images for financial gain.  
    	     Unless you've given permission for that, it's illegal.  OTIS
	     takes no responsibility for this.  In simple terms, all rights
	     revert to the author/artist.  To leave an image on OTIS is to 
	     give permission for it to be viewed, copied and distributed 
	     electronically.  If you don't want your images distributed     
	     all-over, don't upload them.  To leave an image on OTIS is
	     NOT giving permission to have it used in any publication or
	     broadcast that incurs profit (this includes, but is not 
	     limited to, magazines, newsletters, clip-art software,        
	     screen-printed clothing, etc).  You must give specific
	     permission for this sort of usage.  

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Remember, the operative term is "stimulate".  If you know of people
that'd be interested in this sort of thing...get them involved...kick'm
in the booty....offer them free food...whatever...

....e  (ed@cwis.unomaha.edu)
       (ed@sunsite.unc.edu)

--
Ed Stastny           | OTIS Project, END PROCESS, SOUND News and Arts 
PO BX 241113	     | FTP: sunsite.unc.edu (/pub/multimedia/pictures/OTIS)
Omaha, NE 68124-1113 |      141.214.4.135 (projects/otis)
---------------------- EMail: ed@cwis.unomaha.edu, ed@sunsite.unc.edu

File 55/1144: Diffs to sci.space/sci.astro Frequently Asked Questions (83.9%)



DIFFS SINCE LAST FAQ POSTING (IN POSTING ORDER)

(These are hand-edited context diffs; do not attempt to use them to patch
old copies of the FAQ).

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.intro
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06400	Thu Apr  1 14:47:22 1993
--- FAQ.intro	Thu Apr  1 14:46:55 1993
***************
*** 101,107 ****
		  NASA Langley (Technical Reports)
		  NASA Spacelink
		  National Space Science Data Center
-		  Space And Planetary Image Facility
		  Space Telescope Science Institute Electronic Info. Service
		  Starcat
		  Astronomical Databases
--- 101,106 ----
***************
*** 130,135 ****
--- 129,135 ----
	      LLNL "great exploration"
	      Lunar Prospector
	      Lunar science and activities
+	      Orbiting Earth satellite histories
	      Spacecraft models
	      Rocket propulsion
	      Spacecraft design

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.net
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06405	Thu Apr  1 14:47:24 1993
--- FAQ.net	Thu Apr  1 14:46:57 1993
***************
*** 58,63 ****
--- 58,67 ----
      elements are sent out on the list from Dr. Kelso, JSC, and other sources
      as they are released. Email to elements-request@telesoft.com to join.

+     GPS Digest is a moderated list for discussion of the Global Positioning
+     System and other satellite navigation positioning systems. Email to
+     gps-request@esseye.si.com to join.
+
      Space-investors is a list for information relevant to investing in
      space-related companies. Email Vincent Cate (vac@cs.cmu.edu) to join.

***************
*** 223,227 ****
--- 227,241 ----
      1030. If in fact you should should learn of unauthorized access, contact
      NASA personnel.

+     Claims have been made on this news group about fraud and waste. None
+     have ever been substantiated to any significant degree. Readers
+     detecting Fraud, Waste, Abuse, or Mismanagement should contact the NASA
+     Inspector General (24-hours) at 800-424-9183 (can be anonymous) or write
+
+	  NASA
+	  Inspector General
+	  P.O. Box 23089
+	  L'enfant Plaza Station
+	  Washington DC 20024

  NEXT: FAQ #3/15 - Online (and some offline) sources of images, data, etc.

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.data
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06410	Thu Apr  1 14:47:26 1993
--- FAQ.data	Thu Apr  1 14:46:54 1993
***************
*** 216,237 ****
	  Telephone: (301) 286-6695

	  Email address:   request@nssdca.gsfc.nasa.gov
-
-
-     SPACE AND PLANETARY IMAGE FACILITY
-
-     Available 24 hours a day via anonymous FTP from pioneer.unm.edu. Has
-     approximately 150 CD-ROM's full of imagery, raw, and tabular data. To
-     start, get the file:
-
-	  pioneer.unm.edu:pub/info/beginner-info
-
-     This will hopefully give you all of the information you need to get data
-     from their machine. beginner-info has been translated to other
-     languages, you should look inside pub/info for the particular language
-     that meets your needs.
-
-     Contact help@pioneer.unm.edu.


      SPACE TELESCOPE SCIENCE INSTITUTE ELECTRONIC INFORMATION SERVICE
--- 216,221 ----

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.math
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06415	Thu Apr  1 14:47:28 1993
--- FAQ.math	Thu Apr  1 14:46:56 1993
***************
*** 60,65 ****
--- 60,71 ----
	  Gives series to compute positions accurate to 1 arc minute for a
	  period + or - 300 years from now. Pluto is included but stated to
	  have an accuracy of only about 15 arc minutes.
+
+     _Multiyear Interactive Computer Almanac_ (MICA), produced by the US
+     Naval Observatory. Valid for years 1990-1999. $55 ($80 outside US).
+     Available for IBM (order #PB93-500163HDV) or Macintosh (order
+     #PB93-500155HDV). From the NTIS sales desk, (703)-487-4650. I believe
+     this is intended to replace the USNO's Interactive Computer Ephemeris.

      _Interactive Computer Ephemeris_ (from the US Naval Observatory)
      distributed on IBM-PC floppy disks, $35 (Willmann-Bell). Covers dates

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.references
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06420	Thu Apr  1 14:47:30 1993
--- FAQ.references	Thu Apr  1 14:46:59 1993
***************
*** 93,100 ****
      US Naval Observatory
	  202-653-1079 (USNO Bulletin Board via modem)
	  202-653-1507 General
-	  202-653-1545 Nautical Almanac Office (info on the Interactive
-	      Computer Ephemeris)

      Willmann-Bell
      P.O. Box 35025
--- 93,98 ----
***************
*** 138,151 ****
      SDI's SSRT (Single Stage Rocket Technology) project has funded a
      suborbital technology demonstrator called DC-X that should fly in
      mid-1993. Further development towards an operational single-stage to
!     orbit vehicle is uncertain at present; for considerably more detail on
!     the SSRT program, get the document

!	  ames.arc.nasa.gov:pub/SPACE/FAQ/DeltaClipper

!     by anonymous FTP or through the email server.


      HOW TO NAME A STAR AFTER A PERSON

      Official names are decided by committees of the International
--- 136,151 ----
      SDI's SSRT (Single Stage Rocket Technology) project has funded a
      suborbital technology demonstrator called DC-X that should fly in
      mid-1993. Further development towards an operational single-stage to
!     orbit vehicle (called Delta Clipper) is uncertain at present.

!     An collection of pictures and files relating to DC-X is available by
!     anonymous FTP or email server in the directory

!	  bongo.cc.utexas.edu:pub/delta-clipper

+     Chris W. Johnson (chrisj@emx.cc.utexas.edu) maintains the archive.

+
      HOW TO NAME A STAR AFTER A PERSON

      Official names are decided by committees of the International
***************
*** 223,228 ****
--- 223,236 ----
      University Press, 1970. Information about the Lunar Orbiter missions,
      including maps of the coverage of the lunar nearside and farside by
      various Orbiters.
+
+
+     ORBITING EARTH SATELLITE HISTORIES
+
+     A list of Earth orbiting satellites (that are still in orbit) is
+     available by anonymous FTP in:
+
+	  ames.arc.nasa.gov:pub/SPACE/FAQ/Satellites


      SPACECRAFT MODELS

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.addresses
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06435	Thu Apr  1 14:47:34 1993
--- FAQ.addresses	Thu Apr  1 14:46:51 1993
***************
*** 75,80 ****
--- 75,85 ----
	  the latter, an SF 171 is useless. Employees are Caltech employees,
	  contractors, and for the most part have similar responsibilities.
	  They offer an alternative to funding after other NASA Centers.
+
+	  A fact sheet and description of JPL is available by anonymous
+	  FTP in
+
+	      ames.arc.nasa.gov:pub/SPACE/FAQ/JPLDescription

      NASA Johnson Manned Space Center (JSC)
      Houston, TX 77058

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.new_probes
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06450	Thu Apr  1 14:47:38 1993
--- FAQ.new_probes	Thu Apr  1 14:46:58 1993
***************
*** 8,13 ****
--- 8,19 ----
      team, ISAS/NASDA launch schedules, press kits.


+     ASUKA (ASTRO-D) - ISAS (Japan) X-ray astronomy satellite, launched into
+     Earth orbit on 2/20/93. Equipped with large-area wide-wavelength (1-20
+     Angstrom) X-ray telescope, X-ray CCD cameras, and imaging gas
+     scintillation proportional counters.
+
+
      CASSINI - Saturn orbiter and Titan atmosphere probe. Cassini is a joint
      NASA/ESA project designed to accomplish an exploration of the Saturnian
      system with its Cassini Saturn Orbiter and Huygens Titan Probe. Cassini
***************
*** 98,115 ****


      MAGELLAN - Venus radar mapping mission. Has mapped almost the entire
!     surface at high resolution. Currently (11/92) in mapping cycle 4,
!     collecting a global gravity map.


      MARS OBSERVER - Mars orbiter including 1.5 m/pixel resolution camera.
!     Launched 9/24/92 on a Titan III/TOS booster. MO is currently (3/93) in
      transit to Mars, arriving on 8/24/93. Operations will start 11/93 for
      one martian year (687 days).


!     TOPEX/Poseidon - Joint US/French Earth observing satellite, launched in
!     August 1992 on an Ariane 4 booster. The primary objective of the
      TOPEX/POSEIDON project is to make precise and accurate global
      observations of the sea level for several years, substantially
      increasing understanding of global ocean dynamics. The satellite also
--- 104,121 ----


      MAGELLAN - Venus radar mapping mission. Has mapped almost the entire
!     surface at high resolution. Currently (4/93) collecting a global gravity
!     map.


      MARS OBSERVER - Mars orbiter including 1.5 m/pixel resolution camera.
!     Launched 9/25/92 on a Titan III/TOS booster. MO is currently (4/93) in
      transit to Mars, arriving on 8/24/93. Operations will start 11/93 for
      one martian year (687 days).


!     TOPEX/Poseidon - Joint US/French Earth observing satellite, launched
!     8/10/92 on an Ariane 4 booster. The primary objective of the
      TOPEX/POSEIDON project is to make precise and accurate global
      observations of the sea level for several years, substantially
      increasing understanding of global ocean dynamics. The satellite also

===================================================================
diff -t -c -r1.18 FAQ.astronaut
*** /tmp/,RCSt1a06465	Thu Apr  1 14:47:43 1993
--- FAQ.astronaut	Thu Apr  1 14:46:52 1993
***************
*** 162,174 ****
      specific standards:

	   Distant visual acuity:
!		20/100 or better uncorrected,
		correctable to 20/20, each eye.

	   Blood pressure:
		140/90 measured in sitting position.

!     3. Height between 60 and 76 inches.

      Pilot Astronaut Candidate:

--- 162,174 ----
      specific standards:

	   Distant visual acuity:
!		20/150 or better uncorrected,
		correctable to 20/20, each eye.

	   Blood pressure:
		140/90 measured in sitting position.

!     3. Height between 58.5 and 76 inches.

      Pilot Astronaut Candidate:

File 56/1144: Reposting: 10th International Obfuscated C Code Contest rules (2 of 2) (84.6%)


We have received a number of requests for a reposting of the
International Obfuscated C Code Contest rules and guidelines.  Also
some people requested that these rules be posted to a wider set of
groups.  Sorry for the cross posting.

Some technical clarifications were made to the rules and guidelines.
(See the diff marks at the right hand edge)  The rules and guidelines
for this year remain the same, so people who have already or are
in the process of submitting entries for the 1993 IOCCC need not worry 
about these changes.

chongo  /\cc/\        chongo@toad.com
Larry Bassel                            lab@sun.com

=-=

#!/bin/sh
# This is part 02 of a multipart archive
# ============= mkentry.c ==============
echo "x - extracting mkentry.c (Text)"
sed 's/^X//' << 'SHAR_EOF' > mkentry.c &&
X/* @(#)mkentry.c	1.25 4/5/93 15:58:08 */
X/*
X * Copyright (c) Landon Curt Noll & Larry Bassel, 1993.
X * All Rights Reserved.  Permission for personal, education or non-profit use
X * is granted provided this this copyright and notice are included in its
X * entirety and remains unaltered.  All other uses must receive prior
X * permission in writing from both Landon Curt Noll and Larry Bassel.
X */
X/*
X * mkentry - make an International Obfuscated C Code Contest entry
X *
X * usage:
X *	mkentry -r remarks -b build -p prog.c -o ioccc.entry
X *
X *	-r remarks		file with remarks about the entry
X *	-b build		file containing how prog.c should be built
X *	-p prog.c		the obfuscated program source file
X *	-o ioccc.entry		ioccc entry output file
X *
X * compile by:
X *	cc mkentry.c -o mkentry
X */
X/*
X * Placed in the public domain by Landon Curt Noll, 1992.
X *
X * THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS'' AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
X * WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
X * MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
X */
X/*
X * WARNING:
X *
X * This program attempts to implement the IOCCC rules.  Every attempt
X * has been made to make sure that this program produces an entry that
X * conforms to the contest rules.  In all cases, where this program
X * differs from the contest rules, the contest rules will be used.  Be
X * sure to check with the contest rules before submitting an entry.
X *
X * FOR MORE INFORMATION:
X *
X *   You may contact the judges by sending Email to the following address:
X *
X *	...!{apple,pyramid,sun,uunet}!hoptoad!judges	(not the address for
X *	judges@toad.com					 submitting entries)
X *
X *   Questions and comments about the contest are welcome.
X *
X *  The rules and the guidelines may (and often do) change from year to
X *  year.  You should be sure you have the current rules and guidelines
X *  prior to submitting entries.  To obtain them, send Email to the address
X *  above and use the subject 'send rules'.
X *
X *  One may obtain winners of previous contests (1984 to date), via ftp from:
X *
X *	host: ftp.uu.net	(192.48.96.9)
X *	user: anonymous
X *	pass: yourname@yourhost
X *	dir:  ~/pub/ioccc
X *
X *  As a last resort, previous winners may be obtained by sending Email
X *  to the above address.  Please use the subject 'send YEAR winners',
X *  where YEAR is a single 4 digit year, a year range, or 'all'.
X *
X * Because contest rules change from year to year, one should only use this
X * program for the year that it was intended.  Be sure that the RULE_YEAR
X * define below matches this current year.
X */
X
X#include 
X#include 
X#include 
X#include 
X#include 
X
X/* logic */
X#ifndef TRUE
X# define TRUE 1
X#endif /* TRUE */
X#ifndef FALSE
X# define FALSE 0
X#endif /* FALSE */
X#define EOF_OK TRUE
X#define EOF_NOT_OK FALSE
X
X/* global limits */
X#define RULE_YEAR 1993		/* NOTE: should match the current year */
X#define START_DATE "1Mar92 0:00 UTC"	/* first confirmation received */
X#define MAX_COL 79		/* max column a line should hit */
X#define MAX_BUILD_SIZE 256	/* max how to build size */
X#define MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE 3217	/* max program source size */
X#define MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE2 1536	/* max program source size not counting
X				   whitespace and {}; not followed by
X				   whitespace or EOF */
X#define MAX_TITLE_LEN 12	/* max chars in the title */
X#define MAX_ENTRY_LEN 1		/* max length in the entry input line */
X#define MAX_ENTRY 8		/* max number of entries per person per year */
X#define MAX_FILE_LEN 1024	/* max filename length for a info file */
X
X/* where to send entries */
X#define ENTRY_ADDR1 "...!{apple,pyramid,sun,uunet}!hoptoad!obfuscate"
X#define ENTRY_ADDR2 "obfuscate@toad.com"
X
X/* uuencode process - assumes ASCII */
X#define UUENCODE(c) (encode_str[(int)(c)&0xff])
X#define UUENCODE_LEN 45		/* max uuencode chunk size */
X#define UUINFO_MODE 0444	/* mode of an info file's uuencode file */
X#define UUBUILD_MODE 0444	/* mode of the build file's uuencode file */
X#define UUBUILD_NAME "build"	/* name for the build file's uuencode file */
X#define UUPROG_MODE 0444	/* mode of the program's uuencode file */
X#define UUPROG_NAME "prog.c"	/* name for the program's uuencode file */
X
X/* encode_str[(char)val] is the uuencoded character of val */
Xchar encode_str[256+1] = "`!\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_ !\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_ !\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_ !\"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\\]^_";
X
X/* global declarations */
Xchar *program;			/* our name */
Xlong start_time;		/* the startup time */
X
X/* forward declarations */
Xvoid parse_args();
Xvoid usage();
XFILE *open_remark();
XFILE *open_build();
XFILE *open_program();
XFILE *open_output();
Xvoid output_entry();
Xvoid output_remark();
Xvoid output_author();
Xvoid output_info();
Xvoid output_build();
Xvoid output_program();
Xvoid output_end();
Xint get_line();
Xvoid output_till_dot();
Xint col_len();
Xvoid check_io();
Xvoid uuencode();
X
Xmain(argc, argv)
X    int argc;		/* arg count */
X    char **argv;	/* the args */
X{
X    FILE *remark=NULL;	/* open remarks stream */
X    FILE *build=NULL;	/* open build file stream */
X    FILE *prog=NULL;	/* open program stream */
X    FILE *output=NULL;	/* open output stream */
X    char *rname=NULL;	/* file with remarks about the entry */
X    char *bname=NULL;	/* file containing how prog.c should be built */
X    char *pname=NULL;	/* the obfuscated program source file */
X    char *oname=NULL;	/* ioccc entry output file */
X    struct tm *tm;	/* startup time structure */
X
X    /*
X     * check on the year
X     */
X    start_time = time((long *)0);
X    tm = gmtime(&start_time);
X    if (tm->tm_year != RULE_YEAR-1900) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	"%s: WARNING: this program applies to %d, which may differ from %d\n\n",
X	    argv[0], RULE_YEAR, 1900+tm->tm_year);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * parse the command line args
X     */
X    parse_args(argc, argv, &rname, &bname, &pname, &oname);
X
X    /*
X     * open/check the input and output files
X     *
X     * We open and truncate the output file first, in case it is the same
X     * as one of the input files.
X     */
X    output = open_output(oname);
X    remark = open_remark(rname);
X    build = open_build(bname);
X    prog = open_program(pname);
X    if (output==NULL || remark==NULL || build==NULL || prog==NULL) {
X	exit(1);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * output each section
X     */
X    output_entry(output, oname);
X    output_remark(output, oname, remark, rname);
X    output_author(output, oname);
X    output_info(output, oname);
X    output_build(output, oname, build, bname);
X    output_program(output, oname, prog, pname);
X    output_end(output, oname);
X
X    /*
X     * flush the output
X     */
X    if (fflush(output) == EOF) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: flush error in %s: ", program, oname);
X	perror("");
X	exit(2);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * final words
X     */
X    printf("\nYour entry can be found in %s.  You should check this file\n",
X	oname);
X    printf("correct any problems and verify that the uudecode utility will\n");
X    printf("correctly decode your build file and program.\n\n");
X    printf("This program has been provided as a guide for submitters.  In\n");
X    printf("cases where it conflicts with the rules, the rules shall apply.\n");
X    printf("It is your responsibility to ensure that your entry conforms to\n");
X    printf("the current rules.\n\n");
X    printf("Email your entries to:\n");
X    printf("\t%s\n", ENTRY_ADDR1);
X    printf("\t%s\n\n", ENTRY_ADDR2);
X    printf("Please use the following subject when you Email your entry:\n");
X    printf("\tioccc entry\n\n");
X    /* all done */
X    exit(0);
X}
X
X/*
X * parse_args - parse the command line args
X *
X * Given the command line args, this function parses them and sets the
X * required name flags.  This function will return only if the command
X * line syntax is correct.
X */
Xvoid
Xparse_args(argc, argv, rname, bname, pname, oname)
X    int argc;		/* arg count */
X    char **argv;	/* the args */
X    char **rname;	/* file with remarks about the entry */
X    char **bname;	/* file containing how prog.c should be built */
X    char **pname;	/* the obfuscated program source file */
X    char **oname;	/* ioccc entry output file */
X{
X    char *optarg;	/* -flag option operand */
X    int flagname;	/* the name of the -flag */
X    int i;
X
X    /*
X     * Not everyone has getopt, so we must parse args by hand.
X     */
X    program = argv[0];
X    for (i=1; i < argc; ++i) {
X
X	/* determine the flagname */
X	if (argv[i][0] != '-') {
X	    usage(1);
X	    /*NOTREACHED*/
X	}
X	flagname = (int)argv[i][1];
X
X	/* determine the flag's operand */
X	if (flagname != '\0' && argv[i][2] != '\0') {
X	    optarg = &argv[i][2];
X	} else {
X	    if (i+1 >= argc) {
X		usage(2);
X		/*NOTREACHED*/
X	    } else {
X		optarg = argv[++i];
X	    }
X	}
X
X	/* save the flag's operand in the correct global variable */
X	switch (flagname) {
X	case 'r':
X	    *rname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	case 'b':
X	    *bname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	case 'p':
X	    *pname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	case 'o':
X	    *oname = optarg;
X	    break;
X	default:
X	    usage(3);
X	    /*NOTREACHED*/
X	}
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * verify that we have all of the required flags
X     */
X    if (*rname == NULL || *bname == NULL || *pname == NULL || *oname == NULL) {
X	usage(4);
X	/*NOTREACHED*/
X    }
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * usage - print a usage message and exit
X *
X * This function does not return.
X */
Xvoid
Xusage(exitval)
X    int exitval;		/* exit with this value */
X{
X    fprintf(stderr,
X	"usage: %s -r remarks -b build -p prog.c -o ioccc.entry\n\n", program);
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-r remarks\tfile with remarks about the entry\n");
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-b build\tfile containing how prog.c should be built\n");
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-p prog.c\tthe obfuscated program source file\n");
X    fprintf(stderr, "\t-o ioccc.entry\tioccc entry output file\n");
X    exit(exitval);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_remark - open/check the remark file
X *
X * The remark file should be indented by 4 spaces, and should not extend
X * beyond column MAX_COL.  These are not requirements, so we only warn.
X *
X * This function returns NULL on I/O or format error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_remark(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X    char buf[BUFSIZ+1];		/* input buffer */
X    int toolong=0;		/* number of lines that are too long */
X    int non_indent=0;		/* number of lines not indented by 4 spaces */
X
X    /*
X     * open the remark input file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "r");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open remark file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * look at each line
X     */
X    while (fgets(buf, BUFSIZ, stream) != NULL) {
X
X	/* count lines that do not start with 4 spaces */
X	if (buf[0] != '\n' && strncmp(buf, "    ", 4) != 0) {
X	    ++non_indent;
X	}
X
X	/* count long lines */
X	if (col_len(buf) > MAX_COL) {
X	    /* found a line that is too long */
X	    ++toolong;
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* watch for I/O errors */
X    check_io(stream, filename, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* note long lines if needed */
X    if (toolong > 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: WARNING: %d line(s) from %s extend beyond the 80th column\n",
X	    program, toolong, filename);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:          This is ok, but it would be nice to avoid\n\n",
X	    program);
X    }
X
X    /* note non-indented lines, if needed */
X    if (non_indent > 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: WARNING: %d line(s) from %s are not indented by 4 spaces\n",
X	    program, non_indent, filename);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:          This is ok, but it would be nice to avoid\n\n",
X	    program);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    rewind(stream);
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_build - open/check the build file
X *
X * The how to build file must not be longer than MAX_BUILD_SIZE bytes.
X *
X * This function returns NULL on I/O or size error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_build(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X    struct stat statbuf;	/* the status of the open file */
X
X    /*
X     * open the how to build input file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "r");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open how to build file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * determine the size of the file
X     */
X    if (fstat(fileno(stream), &statbuf) < 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot stat how to build file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X    if (statbuf.st_size > MAX_BUILD_SIZE) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: FATAL: the how to build file: %s, is %d bytes long\n",
X	    program, filename, statbuf.st_size);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        it may not be longer than %d bytes\n",
X	    program, MAX_BUILD_SIZE);
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_program - open/check the program source file
X *
X * The program source file must be <= 3217 bytes.  The number of
X * non-whitespace and }{; chars not followed by whitespace must
X * be <= 1536 bytes.
X *
X * This function returns NULL on I/O or size error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_program(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X    struct stat statbuf;	/* the status of the open file */
X    int count;			/* special count size */
X    int c;			/* the character read */
X
X    /*
X     * open the program source input file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "r");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open program source file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	exit(7);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * determine the size of the file
X     */
X    if (fstat(fileno(stream), &statbuf) < 0) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot stat program source file: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X    if (statbuf.st_size > MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: FATAL: the program source file: %s, is %d bytes long\n",
X	    program, filename, statbuf.st_size);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        it may not be longer than %d bytes\n",
X	    program, MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE);
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * count the non-whitespace, non {}; followed by whitespace chars
X     */
X    count = 0;
X    c = 0;
X    while ((c=fgetc(stream)) != EOF) {
X	/* look at non-whitespace */
X	if (!isascii(c) || !isspace(c)) {
X	    switch (c) {
X	    case '{':		/* count if not followed by EOF or whitespace */
X	    case '}':
X	    case ';':
X		/* peek at next char */
X		c = fgetc(stream);
X		if (c != EOF && isascii(c) && !isspace(c)) {
X		    /* not followed by whitespace or EOF, count it */
X		    ungetc(c, stream);
X		    ++count;
X		}
X		break;
X	    default:
X		++count;
X		break;
X	    }
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* watch for I/O errors */
X    check_io(stream, filename, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* look at the special size */
X    if (count > MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE2) {
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s: FATAL: the number of bytes that are non-whitespace, and\n",
X	    program);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        that are not '{', '}', ';' followed by whitespace\n",
X	    program);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        or EOF must be <= %d bytes\n",
X	    program, MAX_PROGRAM_SIZE2);
X	fprintf(stderr,
X	    "%s:        in %s, %d bytes were found\n",
X	    program, filename, count);
X	return(NULL);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    rewind(stream);
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * open_output - open/check the entry output file
X *
X * This function returns NULL on open error.
X */
XFILE *
Xopen_output(filename)
X    char *filename;
X{
X    FILE *stream;		/* the opened file stream */
X
X    /*
X     * open the ioccc entry output file
X     */
X    stream = fopen(filename, "w");
X    if (stream == NULL) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: cannot open ioccc entry file for output: %s: ",
X	    program, filename);
X	perror("");
X	exit(8);
X    }
X
X    /* return the open file */
X    return(stream);
X}
X
X/*
X * output_entry - output the ---entry--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the entry section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_entry(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    char title[MAX_TITLE_LEN+1+1];	/* the entry's title */
X    char buf[MAX_COL+1+1];		/* I/O buffer */
X    int entry=0;			/* entry number */
X    int ret;				/* fields processed by fscanf */
X    int ok_line=0;			/* 0 => the line is not ok */
X    char skip;				/* input to skip */
X    FILE *date_pipe;			/* pipe to a date command */
X    time_t epoch_sec;			/* seconds since the epoch */
X    char *p;
X
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---entry---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the rule year
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "rule:\t%d\n", RULE_YEAR);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /* determine if this is a fix */
X    printf("Is this a fix, update or resubmittion to a ");
X    printf("previous entry (enter y or n)? ");
X    while (get_line(buf, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(buf[0]=='y' || buf[0]=='n')) {
X	printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X    }
X    if (buf[0] == 'y') {
X	fprintf(output, "fix:\ty\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X	printf("\nBe sure that the title and entry number that you give\n");
X	printf("are the same of as the entry you are replacing\n");
X    } else {
X	fprintf(output, "fix:\tn\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * write the title
X     */
X    printf("\nYour title must match expression be a [a-zA-Z0-9_=] character\n");
X    printf("followed by 0 to %d more [a-zA-Z0-9_=+-] characters.\n\n",
X	MAX_TITLE_LEN-1);
X    printf("It is suggested, but not required, that the title should\n");
X    printf("incorporate your username; in the\n");
X    printf("case of multiple authors, consider using parts of the usernames\n");
X    printf("of the authors.\n\n");
X    printf("enter your title: ");
X    do {
X	/* prompt and read a line */
X	if ((ok_line = get_line(title, MAX_TITLE_LEN+1, MAX_COL-9)) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\ntitle is too long, please re-enter: ");
X	    continue;
X	}
X
X	/* verify the pattern, not everyone has regexp, so do it by hand */
X	if (!isascii((int)title[0]) ||
X	    !(isalnum((int)title[0]) || title[0] == '_' || title[0] == '=')) {
X	    printf("\ninvalid first character in the title\n\n");
X	    printf("enter your title: ");
X	    ok_line = 0;
X	} else {
X	    for (p=(&title[1]); *p != '\0' && *p != '\n'; ++p) {
X		if (!isascii((int)*p) ||
X		    !(isalnum((int)*p) ||
X		      *p == '_' || *p == '=' || *p == '+' || *p == '-')) {
X		    printf("\ninvalid character in the title\n\n");
X		    printf("enter your title: ");
X		    ok_line = 0;
X		}
X	    }
X	}
X    } while (ok_line <= 0);
X    fprintf(output, "title:\t%s", title);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the entry number
X     */
X    printf("\nEach person may submit up to %d entries per year.\n\n",
X	MAX_ENTRY);
X    printf("enter an entry number from 0 to %d inclusive: ", MAX_ENTRY-1);
X    do {
X	/* get a valid input line */
X	fflush(stdout);
X	ret = fscanf(stdin, "%d[\n]", &entry);
X	check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X	/* skip over input until newline is found */
X	do {
X	    skip = fgetc(stdin);
X	    check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X	    if (skip != '\n') {
X		/* bad text in input, invalidate entry number */
X		entry = -1;
X	    }
X	} while (skip != '\n');
X
X	/* check if we have a number, and if it is in range */
X	if (ret != 1 || entry < 0 || entry > MAX_ENTRY-1) {
X	    printf(
X	      "\nThe entry number must be between 0 and %d inclusive\n\n",
X		MAX_ENTRY-1);
X	    printf("enter the entry number: ");
X	}
X    } while (ret != 1 || entry < 0 || entry > MAX_ENTRY-1);
X    fprintf(output, "entry:\t%d\n", entry);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the submission date
X     */
X    /* returns a newline */
X    epoch_sec = time(NULL);
X    fprintf(output, "date:\t%s", asctime(gmtime(&epoch_sec)));
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * write the OS/machine host information
X     */
X    printf(
X      "\nEnter the machine(s) and OS(s) under which your entry was tested.\n");
X    output_till_dot(output, oname, "host:");
X}
X
X/*
X * output_remark - output the ---remark--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the entry section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_remark(output, oname, remark, rname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    FILE *remark;		/* stream to the file containing remark text */
X    char *rname;		/* name of the remark file */
X{
X    char buf[BUFSIZ+1];		/* input/output buffer */
X
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---remark---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * copy the remark file to the section
X     */
X    while (fgets(buf, BUFSIZ, remark) != NULL) {
X	fputs(buf, output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X    check_io(remark, rname, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* be sure that the remark section ends with a newline */
X    if (buf[strlen(buf)-1] != '\n') {
X	fputc('\n', output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X}
X
X/*
X * output_author - output the ---author--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information from stdin, and write the author section.
X * If multiple authors exist, multiple author sections will be written.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_author(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    char buf[MAX_COL+1+1];	/* I/O buffer */
X    int more_auths;		/* TRUE => more authors to note */
X    int auth_cnt=0;		/* number of authors processed */
X
X    /*
X     * prompt the user for the author section
X     */
X    printf("\nEnter information about each author.  If your entry is after\n");
X    printf("%s and before the contest deadline, the judges\n", START_DATE);
X    printf("will attempt to Email back a confirmation to the first author\n");
X
X    /*
X     * place author information for each author in an individual section
X     */
X    do {
X
X	/* write the start of the section */
X	fprintf(output, "---author---\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* write the author */
X	printf("\nAuthor #%d name: ", ++auth_cnt);
X	while (get_line(buf, MAX_COL+1, MAX_COL-9) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nname too long, please re-enter: ");
X	}
X	fprintf(output, "name:\t%s", buf);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* write the organization */
X	printf("\nEnter the School/Company/Organization of author #%d\n",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	printf("\nAuthor #%d org: ", auth_cnt);
X	while (get_line(buf, MAX_COL+1, MAX_COL-9) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nline too long, please re-enter: ");
X	}
X	fprintf(output, "org:\t%s", buf);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* write the address */
X	printf(
X	    "\nEnter the postal address for author #%d.  Be sure to include\n",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	printf("your country and do not include your name.\n");
X	output_till_dot(output, oname, "addr:");
X
X	/* write the Email address */
X	printf(
X	    "\nEnter the Email address for author #%d.  Use an address from\n",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	printf(
X	    "a registered domain or well known site.  If you give several\n");
X	printf("forms, list them one per line.\n");
X	output_till_dot(output, oname, "email:");
X
X	/* write the anonymous status */
X	printf("\nShould author #%d remain anonymous (enter y or n)? ",
X	    auth_cnt);
X	while (get_line(buf, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(buf[0]=='y' || buf[0]=='n')) {
X	    printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X	}
X	fprintf(output, "anon:\t%s", buf);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* determine if there is another author */
X	printf("\nIs there another author (enter y or n)? ");
X	while (get_line(buf, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(buf[0]=='y' || buf[0]=='n')) {
X	    printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X	}
X	if (buf[0] == 'y') {
X	    more_auths = TRUE;
X	} else {
X	    more_auths = FALSE;
X	}
X    } while (more_auths == TRUE);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_info - output the ---info--- section(s)
X *
X * Read the needed information from stdin, and write the info section.
X * If multiple info files exist, multiple info sections will be written.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_info(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    char infoname[MAX_FILE_LEN+1];	/* filename buffer */
X    char yorn[1+1];		/* y or n answer */
X    char *uuname;		/* name to uuencode as */
X    FILE *infile;		/* info file stream */
X
X    /*
X     * prompt the user for info information
X     */
X    printf("\nInfo files should be used only to supplement your entry.\n");
X    printf("For example, info files may provide sample input or detailed\n");
X    printf("information about your entry.  Because they are supplemental,\n");
X    printf("the entry should not require them to exist.\n\n");
X
X    /*
X     * while there is another info file to save, uuencode it
X     */
X    printf("Do you have a info file to include (enter y or n)? ");
X    while (get_line(yorn, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(yorn[0]=='y' || yorn[0]=='n')) {
X	printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X    }
X    while (yorn[0] == 'y') {
X
X	/* read the filename */
X	printf("\nEnter the info filename: ");
X	while (get_line(infoname, MAX_FILE_LEN+1, 0) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nInfo filename too long, please re-enter: ");
X	}
X
X	/* compute the basename of the info filename */
X	/* remove the trailing newline */
X	uuname = &infoname[strlen(infoname)-1];
X	*uuname = '\0';
X	/* avoid rindex/shrrchr compat issues, do it by hand */
X	for (--uuname; uuname > infoname; --uuname) {
X	    if (*uuname == '/') {
X		++uuname;
X		break;
X	    }
X	}
X
X	/* attempt to open the info file */
X	infile = fopen(infoname, "r");
X	if (infile == NULL) {
X	    fprintf(stderr, "\n%s: cannot open info file: %s: ",
X		program, infoname);
X	    perror("");
X	    continue;
X	}
X
X	/*
X	 * write the start of the section
X	 */
X	fprintf(output, "---info---\n");
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* uuencode the info file */
X	uuencode(output, oname, infile, infoname, UUINFO_MODE, uuname);
X
X	printf("\nDo you have another info file to include (enter y or n)? ");
X	while (get_line(yorn, 1+1, 0) <= 0 || !(yorn[0]=='y' || yorn[0]=='n')) {
X	    printf("\nplease answer y or n: ");
X	}
X    };
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_build - output the ---build--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information from stdin, and write the build section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_build(output, oname, build, bname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    FILE *build;		/* open build file stream */
X    char *bname;		/* name of the build file */
X{
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---build---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * uuencode the program file
X     */
X    uuencode(output, oname, build, bname, UUBUILD_MODE, UUBUILD_NAME);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_program - output the ---program--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the program section.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_program(output, oname, prog, pname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    FILE *prog;			/* open program stream */
X    char *pname;		/* name of program file */
X{
X    /*
X     * write the start of the section
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---program---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * uuencode the program file
X     */
X    uuencode(output, oname, prog, pname, UUPROG_MODE, UUPROG_NAME);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_end - output the ---end--- section
X *
X * Read the needed information form stdin, and write the 'end section'.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_end(output, oname)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X{
X    /*
X     * write the final section terminator
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "---end---\n");
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * get_line - get an answer from stdin
X *
X * This function will flush stdout, in case a prompt is pending, and
X * read in the answer.
X *
X * This function returns 0 if the line is too long, of the length of the
X * line (including the newline) of the line was ok.  This function does
X * not return if ERROR or EOF.
X */
Xint
Xget_line(buf, siz, maxcol)
X    char *buf;			/* input buffer */
X    int siz;			/* length of input, including the newline */
X    int maxcol;			/* max col allowed, 0 => disable check */
X{
X    int length;			/* the length of the input line */
X
X    /* flush terminal output */
X    fflush(stdout);
X
X    /* read the line */
X    if (fgets(buf, siz+1, stdin) == NULL) {
X	/* report the problem */
X	check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X
X    /* look for the newline */
X    length = strlen(buf);
X    if (buf[length-1] != '\n') {
X	int eatchar;		/* the char being eaten */
X
X	/* no newline found, line must be too long, eat the rest of the line */
X	do {
X	    eatchar = fgetc(stdin);
X	} while (eatchar != EOF && eatchar != '\n');
X	check_io(stdin, "stdin", EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/* report the situation */
X	return 0;
X    }
X
X    /* watch for long lines, if needed */
X    if (maxcol > 0 && (length > maxcol || col_len(buf) > maxcol)) {
X	/* report the situation */
X	return 0;
X    }
X
X    /* return length */
X    return length;
X}
X
X/*
X * output_till_dot - output a set of lines until '.' by itself is read
X *
X * This routine will read a set of lines until (but not including)
X * a single line with '.' is read.  The format of the output is:
X *
X *	leader:\tfirst line
X *	\tnext line
X *	\tnext line
X *	   ...
X *
X * This routine will not return if I/O error or EOF.
X */
Xvoid
Xoutput_till_dot(output, oname, leader)
X    FILE *output;		/* entry's output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* name of the output file */
X    char *leader;		/* the lead text for the first line */
X{
X    char buf[BUFSIZ+1];		/* input buffer */
X    int count;			/* lines read */
X    int done=FALSE;		/* TRUE => finished reading input */
X
X    /* instruct the user on how to input */
X    printf("\nTo end input, enter a line with a single period.\n");
X
X    /* read lines until '.' or EOF */
X    count = 0;
X    while (!done) {
X	/* issue the prompt */
X	printf("%s\t", (count>0) ? "" : leader);
X	fflush(stdout);
X
X	/* get the line */
X	if (get_line(buf, BUFSIZ, MAX_COL-9) <= 0) {
X	    printf("\nline too long, please re-enter:\n\t");
X	    continue;
X	}
X
X	/* note if '.' was read */
X	if (strcmp(buf, ".\n") == 0) {
X	    done = TRUE;
X	}
X
X	/* write line if we read something */
X	if (!done) {
X	    fprintf(output, "%s\t%s", (count++>0) ? "" : leader, buf);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* if no lines read, at least output something */
X    if (count <= 0) {
X	fprintf(output, "%s\t.\n", leader);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X    }
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * col_len - determine the highest that a string would reach
X *
X * Given a string, this routine returns that a string would reach
X * if the string were printed at column 1.  Tab stops are assumed
X * to start at 9, 17, 25, 33, ...
X */
Xint
Xcol_len(string)
X    char *string;		/* the string to examine */
X{
X    int col;	/* current column */
X    char *p;	/* current char */
X
X    /* scan the string */
X    for (col=0, p=string; *p != '\0' && *p != '\n'; ++p) {
X	/* note the column shift */
X	col = (*p=='\t') ? 1+((col+8)/8*8) : col+1;
X    }
X    if (*p == '\n') {
X	--col;
X    }
X
X    /* return the highest column */
X    return col;
X}
X
X/*
X * check_io - check for EOF or I/O error on a stream
X *
X * Does not return if EOF or I/O error.
X */
Xvoid
Xcheck_io(stream, name, eof_ok)
X    FILE *stream;		/* the stream to check */
X    char *name;			/* the name of this stream */
X    int eof_ok;			/* EOF_OK or EOF_NOT_OK */
X{
X    /* test for I/O error */
X    if (ferror(stream)) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: error on %s: ", program, name);
X	perror("");
X	exit(1);
X
X    /* test for EOF */
X    } else if (eof_ok == EOF_NOT_OK && feof(stream)) {
X	fprintf(stderr, "%s: EOF on %s\n", program, name);
X	exit(1);
X    }
X    return;
X}
X
X/*
X * uuencode - uuencode a file
X *
X * Perform the uuencoding process identical to the process performed
X * by the uuencode(1) utility.
X *
X * This routine implements the algorithm described in the uuencode(5)
X * 4.3BSD Reno man page.
X */
Xvoid
Xuuencode(output, oname, infile, iname, umode, uname)
X    FILE *output;		/* output file stream */
X    char *oname;		/* output filename */
X    FILE *infile;		/* input file stream */
X    char *iname;		/* input filename */
X    int umode;			/* the mode to put on the uuencode file */
X    char *uname;		/* name to put on the uuencode file */
X{
X    char buf[UUENCODE_LEN+1];	/* the uuencode buffer */
X    int read_len;		/* actual number of chars read */
X    int val;			/* 6 bit chunk from buf */
X    char filler='\0';		/* filler uuencode pad text */
X    char *p;
X
X    /*
X     * output the initial uuencode header
X     */
X    fprintf(output, "begin %o %s\n", umode, uname);
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X    /*
X     * clear out the input buffer
X     */
X    for (p=buf; p < &buf[sizeof(buf)/sizeof(buf[0])]; ++p) {
X	*p = '\0';
X    }
X
X    /*
X     * We will process UUENCODE_LEN chars at a time, forming
X     * a single output line each time.
X     */
X    while ((read_len=fread(buf,sizeof(buf[0]),UUENCODE_LEN,infile)) > 0) {
X
X	/*
X	 * the first character is the length character
X	 */
X	fputc(UUENCODE(read_len), output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/*
X	 * We will convert 24 bits at a time.  Thus we will convert
X	 * 3 sets of 8 bits into 4 sets of uuencoded 6 bits.
X	 */
X	for (p=buf; read_len>0; read_len-=3, p+=3) {
X
X	    /* bits 0 to 5 */
X	    val = (p[0]>>2)&0x3f;
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	    /* bits 6 to 11 */
X	    val = ((p[0]<<4)&0x30) | ((p[1]>>4)&0x0f);
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	    /* bits 12 to 17 */
X	    val = ((p[1]<<2)&0x3c) | ((p[2]>>6)&0x03);
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	    /* bits 18 to 23 */
X	    val = p[2]&0x3f;
X	    fputc(UUENCODE(val), output);
X	    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X	}
X
X	/* end of UUENCODE_LEN line */
X	fputc('\n', output);
X	check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X
X	/*
X	 * clear out the input buffer  (don't depend on bzero() or memset())
X	 */
X	for (p=buf; p < &buf[sizeof(buf)/sizeof(buf[0])]; ++p) {
X	    *p = '\0';
X	}
X    }
X
X    /* check the last read on the input file */
X    check_io(infile, iname, EOF_OK);
X
X    /* write end of uuencode file */
X    fprintf(output, "%c\nend\n", UUENCODE(filler));
X    check_io(output, oname, EOF_NOT_OK);
X}
SHAR_EOF
chmod 0444 mkentry.c ||
echo "restore of mkentry.c failed"
set `wc -c mkentry.c`;Wc_c=$1
if test "$Wc_c" != "34482"; then
	echo original size 34482, current size $Wc_c
fi
# ============= obfuscate.info ==============
echo "x - extracting obfuscate.info (Text)"
sed 's/^X//' << 'SHAR_EOF' > obfuscate.info &&
X1993 Obfuscated contest information
X
XCopyright (c) Landon Curt Noll & Larry Bassel, 1993.
XAll Rights Reserved.  Permission for personal, education or non-profit use is
Xgranted provided this this copyright and notice are included in its entirety
Xand remains unaltered.  All other uses must receive prior permission in writing
Xfrom both Landon Curt Noll and Larry Bassel.
X
XThe International Obfuscated C Code Contest (IOCCC), in the sprit of
Xco-operation, is willing mention other programming contents, as space
Xpermits.
X
XHow to have your contest included in this file:
X
X    If you wish the IOCCC judges to include your contest in this file,
X    send a request to:
X
X	judges@toad.com
X
X    We request that contest descriptions be limited to 50 lines and to
X    not exceed 2500 bytes.  We typically request that your contest
X    include a current description of the IOCCC.
X
X    In order to be included in this file for given year, we must
X    receive a current description no EARLIER than Jan 1 00:00:00 UTC and
X    no LATER than Feb 15 00:00:00 UTC.  Agreement to publish your
X    contest must also be obtained prior to Feb 15.  Annual contests
X    that fail to submit a new entry will be dropped from this file.
X
XOfficial Disclaimer:  (pardon the officialese)
X
X    The contents noted below, other than the IOCCC, are not affiliated
X    with the IOCCC, nor are they endorsed by the IOCCC.  We reserve the
X    right to refuse to print information about a given contest.
X
X    The information below was provided by the particular contest
X    organizer(s) and printed by permission.  Please contact the
X    contest organizer(s) directly regarding their contents.
X
XWith that official notice given, we present for your ENJOYMENT, the following
Xinformation about contents:
X
X---------------------------------------------------------------------------
X
X    10th International Obfuscated C Contest
X
X	"The original obfuscated contest"
X
X    Obfuscate:  tr.v.  -cated, -cating, -cates.  1. a.  To render obscure.
X                b.  To darken.  2. To confuse:  Their emotions obfuscated
X		their judgment.  [LLat. obfuscare, to darken : ob(intensive) +
X                Lat. fuscare, to darken < fuscus, dark.] -obfuscation n.
X                obfuscatory adj.
X
X    GOALS OF THE CONTEST:
X
X        * To write the most Obscure/Obfuscated C program under the rules below.
X        * To show the importance of programming style, in an ironic way.
X        * To stress C compilers with unusual code.
X        * To illustrate some of the subtleties of the C language.
X        * To provide a safe forum for poor C code.  :-)
X
X    The IOCCC is the grandfather of USENET programming contests.  Since
X    1984, this contest demonstrated that a program that simply works
X    correctly is not sufficient.  The IOCCC has also done much to add
X    the arcane word 'obfuscated' back into the English language.
X    (see "The New Hacker's Dictionary" by Eric Raymond)
X
X    You are strongly encouraged to read the new contest rules before
X    sending any entries.  The rules, and sometimes the contest Email
X    address itself, change over time.  A valid entry one year may
X    be rejected in a later year due to changes in the rules.  The typical
X    start date for contests is in early March.  Contest rules are normally not
X    finalized and posted until the beginning of the contest.  The typical
X    closing date for contests are in early May.
X
X    The rules and the guidelines may (and often do) change from year to
X    year.  You should be sure you have the current rules and guidelines
X    prior to submitting entries.  To obtain them, send Email to the address
X    above and use the subject 'send rules'.
X
X    One may obtain winners of previous contests (1984 to date), via ftp from:
X
X	host: ftp.uu.net	(192.48.96.9)
X	user: anonymous
X	pass: yourname@yourhost
X	dir:  ~/pub/ioccc
X
X    As a last resort, previous winners may be obtained by sending Email
X    to the above address.  Please use the subject 'send YEAR winners',
X    where YEAR is a single 4 digit year, a year range, or 'all'.
X
X---------------------------------------------------------------------------
X
X    0th International Obfuscated Perl Contest
X	By: Landon Noll & Larry Wall
X
X    This content is being planned.  Someday when Landon & Larry are not too
X    busy, they will actually get around to posting the first set of rules!
X
X    Landon says: "Yes, I know that I said we would have a contest in 1993,
X		  but other existing projects got in the way.  Hopefully
X		  something will be developed after Nov 1993."
X
X---------------------------------------------------------------------------
X
X                2nd International obFUsCaTeD POsTsCripT Contest
X                     Jonathan Monsarrat (jgm@cs.brown.edu)
X                         Alena Lacova (alena@nikhef.nl)
X
X    A  contest of  programming skills  and  knowledge, exclusively  for the
X    PostScript programming language. Its purpose:
X
X    * To spread knowledge of PostScript and its details.
X    * To applaud those with the best tricks.
X    * To prove  that humans can  beat those damnable  machine generators at
X      their own game by writing  the most obscure and mysterious PostScript
X      programs ever.
X
X    Winners will receive the fame and attention that goes with having their
X    program entry posted as a winner to programmers world-wide.
X
X    The 1993 contest rules and results are available by ftp as
X    ``wilma.cs.brown.edu:pub/postscript/obfuscated*.shar'', or individually
X    in the obfuscated directory. The judges will post the 1994 rules
X    in November to comp.lang.postscript on Usenet, and other places.
X    Send questions to jgm@cs.brown.edu.
X
X    Categories include: Best Obfuscated PostScript, Best Artwork,
X    Most Compact, Best Interactive Program, Most Useful, and
X    anything so unusual and creative that it deserves an award.
X
X    The judges will choose the winners of each category.
X
X    Alena Lacova  is a system  administrator at NIKHEF  (Institute for High
X    Energy and Nuclear  Physics) in the  Netherlands. She is  the author of
X    The PostScript Chaos  Programs, which draw  Julia sets, Mandelbrot sets
X    and other kinds of fractal functions.
X
X    Jonathan Monsarrat is a graduate  student from MIT and Brown University
X    in  the  U.S.A. He  is  the  FAQ maintainer  for  the  Usenet newsgroup
X    comp.lang.postscript and the author of The PostScript Zone and LameTeX.
X .
X
SHAR_EOF
chmod 0444 obfuscate.info ||
echo "restore of obfuscate.info failed"
set `wc -c obfuscate.info`;Wc_c=$1
if test "$Wc_c" != "6418"; then
	echo original size 6418, current size $Wc_c
fi
exit 0
-- 
Sunnyvale residents: Vote Landon Noll for Sunnyvale City Council seat 1.

File 57/1144: Re: Need PD X-Y Plot Package (88.1%)




 "Steve" == Steve Frysinger of Blue Feather Farm  writes:

 Steve> Folks,

 Steve> I'm looking for a Public Domain X-Y plotting package for X.
 Steve> I need basic capabilities (axes, labels, log and linear, &c).
 Steve> It's hard to imagine that someone has not put such a thing
 Steve> together, so I'm hoping to avoid reinventing the wheel.

 Steve> Thanks for any leads!

 Steve> Steve Frysinger

Your might take a look a PLPLOT.  Version 4.99c (actually beta v5.0)
can be found anonymous ftp from hagar.ph.utexas.edu, in the pub/plplot 
directory.  

--Mark

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Mark Stucky                         | Email:                               |
| United Technologies Research Center |     mark@ardnt1.res.utc.com          |
| East Hartford, CT.                  |or   mbs@rcinet.res.utc.com           |
| 06108                               |or   mbs@utrc.res.utc.com             |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 From the README file of version 4.99c:

 This is the PLPLOT distribution.  PLPLOT is a scientific plotting package for
 many systems, small (micro) and large (super) alike.  Despite its small size
 and quickness, it has enough power to satisfy most users, including: standard
 x-y plots, semilog plots, log-log plots, contour plots, 3D plots, mesh plots,
 bar charts and pie charts.  Multiple graphs (of the same or different sizes)
 may be placed on a single page with multiple lines in each graph.  Different
 line styles, widths and colors are supported.  A virtually infinite number of
 distinct area fill patterns may be used.  There are almost 1000 characters in
 the extended character set.  This includes four different fonts, the Greek
 alphabet and a host of mathematical, musical, and other symbols.  The fonts
 can be scaled to any size for various effects.  Many different output device
 drivers are available (system dependent), including a portable metafile
 format and renderer.

 The PLPLOT package is freely distributable, but NOT in the public domain.
 The PLPLOT source code, except header files and those files explicitly
 granting permission, may not be used in a commercial software package without
 consent of the authors.  You are allowed and encouraged to include the PLPLOT
 object library and header files in a commercial package provided that: (1) it
 is explicitly and prominently stated that the PLPLOT library is freely
 available, and (2) the full copyrights on the PLPLOT package be displayed
 somewhere in the documentation for the package.

 We welcome suggestions on how to improve this code, especially in the form of
 user-contributed enhancements or bug fixes.  If PLPLOT is used in any
 published papers, please include an acknowledgment or citation of our work,
 which will help us to continue improving PLPLOT.  Also, please remember that
 as PLPLOT is not a commercial product, we cannot be expected to offer the
 kind of support that a commercial product may.  There is great interest
 in extending PLPLOT and fixing bugs, but the principal authors can only
 afford to work on it part time.  Improvements will necessarily focus on
 those which help us get our work done.

 PLPLOT is written in C, enabling it to run on many platforms practically
 without modification.  Fortran programs may use it transparently; stub
 routines are provided to handle the C<->Fortran interface without any
 modification of the user program.  C programs are required to include the
 header file "plplot.h"; see the documentation for more details.

 The main documentation for PLPLOT is in the doc/ directory in the form of
 several TeX files; please consult this for additional information ('latex
 plotdoc').  Unfortunately documentation tends to lag actual improvements to
 the code, so don't be surprised if some known features are not explained
 there.  Consult 'Changes.log' to see a list of recent changes.  

 At present, PLPLOT is known to work on the following systems:

	 Unix:	SunOS
		 A/IX 
		 HP-UX
		 Unicos
		 DG/UX
		 Ultrix
		 SysV
		 Linux

	 Amiga/Exec
	 MS-DOS
	 OS/2
	 NeXT

 For more information on how to get or use PLPLOT on your system, see:
  - appendices to the PLPLOT manual
  - system-specific documentation in the appropriate sys/ directory.

 To become a subscriber to the PLPLOT mailing list, send a request to
 plplot-request@dino.ph.utexas.edu.

 CREDITS
 -------

 PLPLOT is the result of the effort of many people, so it is impractical to
 list all the contributors.   Those currently supporting and otherwise
 responsible for the package in its present form include:

 Maurice LeBrun
 Please send all comments, flames, patches, etc, to me.  I am responsible for
 all the PLPLOT kernel development as well as most of the work on the
 metafile, xwindow, xterm, postscript, tektronix, and Amiga drivers.

 EMAIL	mjl@fusion.ph.utexas.edu 
 USMAIL	Dr. Maurice LeBrun
	 Institute for Fusion Studies
	 University of Texas
	Austin, TX  78712


Geoff Furnish
Please send questions regarding the MS-DOS and OS/2 drivers to Geoff.

EMAIL	furnish@fusion.ph.utexas.edu
USMAIL	Geoff Furnish
	Institute for Fusion Studies
	University of Texas
	Austin, TX  78712


Tony Richardson
Creator of PLPLOT 2.6b, 3.0
Please send questions regarding installation of PLPLOT on the NeXT to Tony.

EMAIL   amr@egr.duke.edu

USMAIL  Tony Richardson              Tony Richardson
        184 Electrical Engineering   2920 Chapel Hill Road Apt. 41-D
        Duke University              Durham, NC 27707
        Durham, NC 27706
        ph 919-684-5274              ph 919-493-1609

File 58/1144: List of large integer arithmetic packages (87.1%)


This is the file BIGNUMS.TXT from ripem.msu.edu, last updated April 1993.

In response to Email requests, I have assembled this list of
large-integer arithmetic packages of which I have heard.
Most of these are C function libraries, available in source form.

For your convenience, I have placed copies of
some of these on ripem.msu.edu (35.8.1.178).  They are
available for anonymous FTP in the directory "pub/bignum".
However, what I have may not be the most current version in all cases.

Here they are, in no particular order:

mp
    Multiple Precision package that comes with some Unixes
    
    Multiple precision package accessed via -lmp flag on your
    compiler.  Provides +, -, *, /, gcd, exponentiation,
    sqrt.  Comes with SunOS, NeXT Mach, BBN Mach 1000, 
    and probably a few others.  See "man mp".  
    Object code only, of course.

PARI
    Henri Cohen, et al., Universite Bordeaux I, Paris, FRANCE
    
    Multiple precision desk calculator and library routines.
    Contains optimized assembly code for Motorola 68020, 
    semi-optimized code for SPARC, and apparently rather slow
    generic C version.  Does both integers and reals.
    Does vectors and matrices as well as scalars.
    Contains a number of advanced functions, some of which I've
    never heard of.  ("Weber's function"?)
    Has a factorization function, primality test, & other related stuff.
    Plenty of TEX documentation.
    Public domain, but you can't distribute modified versions.
    Available via anonymous FTP from math.ucla.edu.  There seem to
    be Mac- and NeXT-specific versions there in addition to:
    Filename:  pari-1.35a.tar.Z
    
Arithmetic in Global Fields  (Arith)
    Kevin R. Coombes, David R. Grant
    
    Package of routines for arbitrary precision integers or
    polynomials over finite fields.  Includes basic +, -, *, /
    and a few others like gcd.  Source code in C.
    Distributed under the terms of the GNU public license.
    Includes man pages and TEX documentation.
    Filename:  arith.tar.Z

Arbitrary Precision Math Library
    Lloyd Zusman   Los Gatos, CA
    
    C package which supports basic +, -, *, /.  Provides for radix
    points (i.e., non-integers).  Not as polished as the others here.
    Posted to comp.sources.misc in October 1988.
    Filename:  apml.tar.Z
    
BigNum
    J. Vuillemin, INRIA, FRANCE, and others.
    Distributed by Digital Equipment Paris Research Lab (DECPRL)
    
    A "portable and efficient arbitrary-precision integer" package.
    C code, with generic C "kernel", plus assembly "kernels" for
    MC680x0, Intel i960, MIPS, NS32032, Pyramid, and of course VAX.
    This is probably one of the better-known packages of this type.
    Implements +, -, *, /, mod, plus logical operations OR, AND, XOR.
    Both signed and unsigned arithmetic available.
    Available via email from librarian@decprl.dec.com.
    You will receive 5 shell archives.  Give your postal address
    and you will also receive printed documentation from France.
    Package includes TEX documentation.
    Publicly available for non-commercial use.
    I removed this from my archive when I heard a rumor that PRL
    doesn't like others to distribute it.  However, BIGNUM *is*
    distributed as part of ecpp (see below).

Lenstra's package
    Arjen Lenstra   Bellcore
    
    Portable unsigned integer package written entirely in C.
    Includes +, -, *, /, exponentiation, mod, primality testing,
    sqrt, random number generator, and a few others.  The package
    was uncommented and undocumented; I have tried to add enough
    comments to get by.  This is the only of these packages that I
    have actually used.  It works well and is very portable.  
    I haven't done any benchmarks against the others, but the code 
    looks clever & Lenstra is an accomplished number theorist.
    Unlike the other packages here, this one requires you to allocate
    storage statically--only a problem if your numbers are really huge.
    Arjen has placed the code in the public domain.  
    Filename:  lenstra.tar.Z

lenstra_3.1
    Arjen Lenstra,  Bellcore

    An improved version of Arjen's package above.  This one
    does signed arithmetic and dynamic allocation (which can be turned
    off as an option). Has a few new routines, too.  "lenstra_3.1" contains
    minor bugfixes to the previously-available "lenstra_2" and "lenstra_3".
    Filename:  lenstra_3.1.c

bmp  (Brent's Multiple Precision?)
    R. P. Brent

    1981 vintage FORTRAN code to do extended precision floating &
    fixed point arithmetic.  Includes most of the mathematical
    functions you'd find in a FORTRAN run-time library.
    This code is an ACM algorithm, number 524.
    To obtain, send a mail message to  netlib@ornl.gov
    containing the line "send mp.f from bmp" or better yet, perhaps
    just start with "help".

SPX
    Kannan Alagappan & Joseph Tardo, DEC
    
    This is a huge prototype public key authentication system
    based on RSA.  I mention it here because those who have heard
    of SPX have probably correctly guessed that it contains a large
    integer package and I want to inform you that the large integer
    package it contains is indeed DEC's BigNum from France.
    You can get a beta test copy of SPX from crl.dec.com (192.58.206.2). 
    Use it only for testing, as it "may" expire on a certain date.
    (I don't know whether this has expired yet.)

amp  (Antti's Multiple Precision?)
    Antti Louko   alo@kampi.hut.fi

    Multiple precision integer package in C.  Includes +, -, *, /, %,
    pow, mod, 1/x mod y, random, sqrt, gcd.  Available for non-commercial
    use.  The package includes "share-secret", a public key system based
    on the Diffie-Hellman algorithm.
    This is normally part of the well-known "des-dist.tar.Z",
    but I have removed the DES part to avoid having to deal with 
    cryptographic export laws, and have named the result:
    Filename:  amp.tar.Z

gennum  
    Per Bothner   U of Wisconsin-Madison

    C++ routines and classes to do generic arithmetic, both
    integer and rational.  
    Formerly available on sevenlayer.cs.wis.edu.  However, it
    seems to have disappeared.  Sorry.

MIRACL
    (By someone in Dublin, Ireland)

    Integer and fractional multiple precision package.
    Includes factorization, primality testing, encryption.
    Not public domain, apparently.  It is available from the Austin
    Code Works.  (See ads in Byte Magazine or Dr. Dobbs.)

precision
    Dave Barrett  barrettd@tigger.colorado.edu

    Multiple precision integer package in C with +,-,*,/, sqrt, rand,
    mod, pow, log.  Simple vector support.  Does dynamic allocation of memory.
    Free as long as you don't sell it or any program that uses it.
    Filename:  precision.tar.Z

UBASIC
    Prof. Yuji Kida, Rikkyo University, Nishi-Ikebukuro 3, Tokyo 171, Japan
    kida@rkmath.rikkyo.ac.jp

    Multiple-precision version of the BASIC programming language,
    for MS-DOS.  Includes floating point.  Said (by Keith Briggs)
    to be pretty fast.  Object only, I think.  ervin@morekypr.bitnet
    says:  "This is the best package that I know of for
    fast arithmetic.  Has a version optimized for 386 machines.  Includes
    routines to do MPQS, the fastest currently known general factoring
    algorithm.  An additional file is at both sites to allow MPQS to use
    hard drives so that it can factor up to 80 digits.  Many number
    theoretical functions are included in UBASIC.  It allows over 2500
    digits of precision."
    Available via anonymous FTP from shape.mps.ohio-state.edu,
    or simtel20.army.mil, or wuarchive.wustl.edu.

calc_v22
    Unknown

    MS-DOS C-like language that allows "infinite" precision.
    Nice intrinsic functions.  ervin@morekypr.bitnet reports problems
    when changing precision on the fly.
    See simtel20 or wuarchive.

briggs_arith
    Keith Briggs (kbriggs@mundoe.maths.mu.oz.au)

    Turbo Pascal 5 source for routines that do multiple-precision
    +, -, *, /, sqrt, gcd, factoring, rand for integers; also includes
    +, -, *, / and rand for rational numbers.
    Filename:  briggs_arith.pas

Institute fur Experimentelle Mathematik
    Dr Gerhard Schneider (?)

    Fast C multiple-precision subroutine library.
    I don't know anything about it; sl25@ely.cl.cam.ac.uk says
    to contact MAT420@DE0HRZ1A.BITNET for more info.
    Postal Address:
    Institute fur Experimentelle Mathematik
    EllernStr 29
    D4300 Essen-12    GERMANY

LongInt
    Markus Mueller (mueller@komsys.tik.ethz.ch)

    "Multi precision arithmetic written in MODULA-2, with the most time critical
    parts written in Assembler. Includes basic arithmetics (+, -, *, /, %) as
    well as arithmetics MODULO a number. An additional module provides a
    collection of procedures for primality testing, gcd, multiplicative
    inverse and more. The package is part of a Privacy Enhanced Mail (PEM)
    package which includes a PEM mailer, RSA key generator and Certificate
    generation tools."

    Source is in Modula-2, C, and assembler for Sun 3.  LongInt has
    also been ported to MS-DOS under Logitech Modula-2 and Turbo
    Assembler.  Availability:  free for university use (research and
    education); otherwise, a source license is required.  To obtain,
    write or email to:

        Markus Mueller
        Bertastrasse 7
        CH-8953 Dietikon
        Switzerland
        email:  mueller@komsys.tik.ethz.ch

bignum-1.2
    Henrik.Johansson@Nexus.Comm.SE

    Bignum package written in portable C.  Will in the future
    conform to the Common Lisp functions that handles integers.
    Currently includes +, -, *, /, exponentiation, "exptmod",
    comparison, random numbers, and gcd.
    Filename: bignum-1.2

GNU Multiple Precision
    GNU (Free Software Foundation) multiple precision package.
    I haven't looked at it yet.  This is current as of April 1992,
    but there may be a more recent version by the time you read 
    this.  This package is very widely available on FTP sites.
    Filename: gmp-1.2.tar.Z

Elliptic Curve Primality Proving 
    Francois Morian, France.

    Large package to prove the primality of any prime.
    Includes Inria's BIGNUM package. 
    Obtained from ftp.inria.fr (128.93.1.26).
    Filename: ecpp.V3.4.1.tar.Z

PGP (Pretty Good Privacy)
    Philip Zimmermann   prz@sage.cgd.ucar.EDU

    Intel-based crypto package that includes bignum routines in C,
    said to be quite fast for Intel processors.  Unix and Mac
    versions also available.
    The crypto package violates RSA patents, but the bignum routines
    can be used without fear of legal repercussions.

Bell's Arbitrary Precision Calculator
    David I. Bell, Australia  (dbell@pdact.pd.necisa.oz.au)

    Arbitrary-precision calculator with good online help, C-like
    language, many builtin functions, support for integers,
    rational numbers (they work like floating point), complex numbers,
    matrices, strings, lists, files, "objects".  Includes 
    gcd, primality testing, even trig functions.  Recommended.
    (Large package, though.)  Obtained from comp.sources.unix.
    Filename: calc-1.24.7.tar.Z

Built-in support in other languages
    Various

    Multiple precision arithmetic is available in a number of 
    programming languages, such as Lisp and ABC (cf. mcsun.eu.net).
    Perl (by Larry Wall, available from devvax.jpl.nasa.gov)
    includes source, in Perl, for such a package, but it's probably
    not suitable for serious use.
    For some of these, source code may be available.  This list is
    long enough, so I'm not going to pursue it aggressively.

Thanks to Ed Vielmetti and several others who contributed to this list.

Mark Riordan   mrr@ripem.msu.edu

File 59/1144: HICN610 Medical News Part 3/4 (79.3%)



------------- cut here -----------------
University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona



                               Suggested Reading

Tan SL, Royston P, Campbell S, Jacobs HS, Betts J, Mason B, Edwards RG (1992).  
Cumulative conception and Livebirth rates after in-vitro fertilization. Lancet 
339:1390-1394. 

For further information, call:
                        Physicians' Resource Line
                             1-800-328-5868
                               in Tucson:
                                694-5868


























HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 28
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
                                   Articles
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

                    LOW LEVELS OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES LINKED
                           TO SERIOUS ASTHMA ATTACKS
                           American Lung Association 

     A new study published by the American Lung Association has shown that 
surprisingly low concentrations of airborne particles can send people with 
asthma rushing to emergency rooms for treatment.  
     The Seattle-based study showed that roughly one in eight emergency visits 
for asthma in that city was linked to exposure to particulate air pollution.  
The actual exposure levels recorded in the study were far below those deemed 
unsafe under federal air quality laws.  
     "People with asthma have inflamed airways, and airborne particles tend to 
exacerbate that inflammation," said Joel Schwartz, Ph.D., of the Environmental 
Protection Agency, who was the lead author of the study.  "When people are on 
the threshold of having, a serious asthma attack, particles can push them over 
the edge." 
     The Seattle Study correlated 13 months of asthma emergency room visits 
with daily levels of PM,,,. or particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter 
of 10 microns or less.  These finer particles are considered hazardous because 
they are small enough penetrate into the lung.  Cities are considered out of 
compliance with clean air laws if the 24-hour average concentration of PM10 
exceeds 150 micrograms per cubic millimeter of air.  
     In Seattle however, a link between fine particles and asthma was found at 
levels as low as 30 micrograms.  The authors concluded that for every 30 
microgram increase in the four-day average of PM10, the odds of someone with 
asthma needing emergency treatment increased by 12 percent.  
     The findings were published in the April American Review of Respiratory 
Disease, an official journal of the American Thoracic Society, the Lung 
Association's medical section.  
     The study is the latest in a series of recent reports to suggest that 
particulate matter is a greatly under appreciated health threat.  A 1992 study 
by Dr. Schwartz and Douglas Dockery, Ph.D., of Harvard found that particles 
may be causing roughly 60,000 premature deaths each year in the United States.  
Other studies have linked particulate matter to increased respiratory symptoms 
and bronchitis in children.  
     "Government officials and the media are still very focused on ozone," 
says Dr. Schwartz.  "But more and more research is showing that particles are 
bad actors as well."      One problem in setting, standards for particulate 
air pollution is that PMIO is difficult to study.  Unlike other regulated 
pollutants such as ozone and carbon monoxide, particulate matter is a complex 
and varying mixture of substances, including carbon, hydrocarbons, dust, and 

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 29
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

acid aerosols.  
     "Researchers can't Put people in exposure chambers to study the effects 
of particulate air pollution," says Dr. Schwartz.  "We have no way of 
duplicating the typical urban mix of particles.  " Consequently, most of what 
is known about particulates has been learned through population-based research 
like the Seattle study.  
     Given that the EPA's current priority is to review the ozone and sulfur 
dioxide standards, the agency is unlikely to reexamine the PM10 standard any 
time soon.  Until changes are made, there appears to be little people with 
asthma can do to protect themselves from airborne particles.
     "In some areas, you can get reports on air quality, but the reports only 
cover the pollutant that is closest to violating its standard, and that's 
rarely particulate matter," says Dr.  Schwartz.  "However, PM10 doesn't have 
to be near its violation range to be unhealthy."































HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 30
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

               NIH Consensus Development Conference on Melanoma

The National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on 
Diagnosis and Treatment of Early Melanoma brought together experts in 
dermatology, pathology, epidemiology, public education, surveillance 
techniques, and potential new technologies as well as other health care 
professionals and the public to address (1) the clinical and histological 
characteristics of early melanoma; (2) the appropriate diagnosis, management, 
and followup of patients with early melanoma; (3) the role of dysplastic nevi 
and their significance; and (4) the role of education and screening in 
preventing melanoma morbidity and mortality.  Following 2 days of 
presentations by experts and discussion by the audience, a consensus panel 
weighed the scientific evidence and prepared their consensus statement. 
 
Among their findings, the panel recommended that (1) melanoma in situ is a 
distinct entity effectively treated surgically with 0.5 centimeter margins; 
(2) thin invasive melanoma, less than 1 millimeter thick, has the potential 
for long-term survival in more than 90 percent of patients after surgical 
excision with a 1 centimeter margin; (3) elective lymph node dissections and 
extensive staging evaluations are not recommended in early melanoma; (4) 
patients with early melanoma are at low risk for relapse but may be at high 
risk for development of subsequent melanomas and should be followed closely; 
(5) some family members of patients with melanoma are at increased risk for 
melanoma and should be enrolled in surveillance programs; and (6) education 
and screening programs have the potential to decrease morbidity and mortality 
from melanoma. 
 
A copy of the full text of the consensus panel's statement is available by 
calling the NIH Office of Medical Applications of Research at (301) 496-1143 
or by writing to:  Office of Medical Applications of Research, National 
Institutes of Health, Federal Building, Room 618, Bethesda, MD 20892.














HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 31
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

                         NCI-Designated Cancer Centers

The Cancer Centers Program is comprised of 55 NCI-designated Cancer Centers 
actively engaged in multidisciplinary research efforts to reduce cancer 
incidence, morbidity, and mortality.  Within the program, there are four types 
of cancer centers:  basic science cancer centers (14), which engage primarily 
in basic cancer research; clinical cancer centers (12), which focus on 
clinical research; "comprehensive" cancer centers (28), which emphasize a 
multidisciplinary approach to cancer research, patient care, and community 
outreach; and consortium cancer centers (1), which specialize in cancer 
prevention and control research. 
 
Although some cancer centers existed in the late 1960s and the 1970s, it was 
the National Cancer Act of 1971 that authorized the establishment of 15 new 
cancer centers, as well as continuing support for existing ones.  The passage 
of the act also dramatically transformed the centers' structure and broadened 
the scope of their mission to include all aspects of basic, clinical, and 
cancer control research.  Over the next two decades, the centers' program grew 
progressively. 
 
In 1990, there were 19 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation. Today, 
there are 28 of these institutions, all of which meet specific NCI criteria 
for comprehensive status. 
 
To attain recognition from the NCI as a comprehensive cancer center, an 
institution must pass rigorous peer review.  Under guidelines newly 
established in 1990, the eight criteria for "comprehensiveness" include the 
requirement that a center have a strong core of basic laboratory research in 
several scientific fields, such as biology and molecular genetics, a strong 
program of clinical research, and an ability to transfer research findings 
into clinical practice. 
 
Moreover, five of the criteria for comprehensive status go significantly 
beyond that required for attaining a Cancer Center Support Grant (also 
referred to as a P30 or core grant), the mechanism of choice for supporting 
the infrastructure of a cancer center's operations.  These criteria encompass 
strong participation in NCI-designated high-priority clinical trials, 
significant levels of cancer prevention and control research, and important 
outreach and educational activities--all of which are funded by a variety of 
sources. 
 
The other types of cancer centers also have special characteristics and 
capabilities for organizing new programs of research that can exploit 
important new findings or address timely research questions. 
 

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 32
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

Of the 55 NCI-designated Cancer Centers, 14 are of the basic science type.  
These centers engage almost entirely in basic research, although some centers 
engage in collaborative research with outside clinical research investigators 
and in cooperative projects with industry to generate medical applications 
from new discoveries in the laboratory. 
 
Clinical cancer centers, in contrast, focus on both basic research and 
clinical research within the same institutional framework, and frequently 
incorporate nearby affiliated clinical research institutions into their 
overall research programs.  There are 12 such centers today. 
 
Finally, consortium cancer centers, of which there is one, are uniquely 
structured and concentrate on clinical research and cancer prevention and 
control research.  These centers interface with state and local public health 
departments for the purpose of achieving the transfer of effective prevention 
and control techniques from their research findings to those institutions 
responsible for implementing population-wide public health programs.  
Consortium centers also are heavily engaged in collaborations with 
institutions that conduct clinical trial research and coordinate community 
hospitals within a network of cooperating institutions in clinical trials. 
 
Together, the 55 NCI-Designated Cancer Centers continue to work toward 
creating new and innovative approaches to cancer research, and through 
interdisciplinary efforts, to effectively move this research from the 
laboratory into clinical trials and into clinical practice. 
 
Comprehensive Cancer Centers (Internet addresses are given where available) 
 
University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center
Basic Health Sciences Building, Room 108
1918 University Boulevard
Birmingham, Alabama 35294
(205) 934-6612
 
University of Arizona Cancer Center
1501 North Campbell Avenue
Tucson, Arizona 85724
(602) 626-6372
 
Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of California at Los Angeles
200 Medical Plaza
Los Angeles, California 90027
(213) 206-0278

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 33
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

 
Kenneth T. Norris Jr. Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of Southern California
1441 Eastlake Avenue
Los Angeles, California  90033-0804
(213) 226-2370
 
Yale University Comprehensive Cancer Center
333 Cedar Street
New Haven, Connecticut 06510
(203) 785-6338
 
Lombardi Cancer Research Center
Georgetown University Medical Center
3800 Reservoir Road, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20007
(202) 687-2192
 
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of Miami Medical School
1475 Northwest 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33136
(305) 548-4800
 
Johns Hopkins Oncology Center
600 North Wolfe Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21205
(410) 955-8638
 
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
44 Binney Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02115
(617) 732-3214
 
Meyer L. Prentis Comprehensive Cancer Center of Metropolitan
Detroit
110 East Warren Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48201
(313) 745-4329
 
University of Michigan Cancer Center

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 34
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

101 Simpson Drive
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0752
(313) 936-9583
 
Mayo Comprehensive Cancer Center
200 First Street Southwest
Rochester, Minnesota 55905
(507) 284-3413
 
Norris Cotton Cancer Center
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
One Medical Center Drive
Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756
(603) 646-5505
 
Roswell Park Cancer Institute
Elm and Carlton Streets
Buffalo, New York 14263
(716) 845-4400
 
Columbia University Comprehensive Cancer Center
College of Physicians and Surgeons
630 West 168th Street
New York, New York 10032
(212) 305-6905
 
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue
New York, New York 10021
(800) 525-2225
 
Kaplan Cancer Center
New York University Medical Center
462 First Avenue
New York, New York 10016-9103
(212) 263-6485
 
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
(919) 966-4431
 

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 35
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center
P.O. Box 3814
Durham, North Carolina 27710
(919) 286-5515
 
Cancer Center of Wake Forest University at the Bowman Gray School
of Medicine
300 South Hawthorne Road
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103
(919) 748-4354
 
Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
300 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
(614) 293-5485
 
Fox Chase Cancer Center
7701 Burholme Avenue
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111
(215) 728-2570
 
University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center
3400 Spruce Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
(215) 662-6364
 
Pittsburgh Cancer Institute
200 Meyran Avenue
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213-2592
(800) 537-4063
 
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
1515 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, Texas 77030
(713) 792-3245
 
Vermont Cancer Center
University of Vermont
1 South Prospect Street
Burlington, Vermont 05401
(802) 656-4580
 

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 36
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
1124 Columbia Street
Seattle, Washington 98104
(206) 667-4675
 
University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center
600 Highland Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53792
(608) 263-8600
 
 
 
Clinical Cancer Centers
 
 
University of California at San Diego Cancer Center
225 Dickinson Street
San Diego, California 92103
(619) 543-6178
 
City of Hope National Medical Center
Beckman Research Institute
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, California 91010
(818) 359-8111 ext. 2292
 
University of Colorado Cancer Center
4200 East 9th Avenue, Box B188
Denver, Colorado 80262
(303) 270-7235
 
University of Chicago Cancer Research Center
5841 South Maryland Avenue, Box 444
Chicago, Illinois 60637
(312) 702-6180
 
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
1300 Morris Park Avenue
Bronx, New York 10461
(212) 920-4826
 

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 37
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

University of Rochester Cancer Center
601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 704
Rochester, New York 14642
(716) 275-4911
 
Ireland Cancer Center Case Western Reserve University
University Hospitals of Cleveland
2074 Abington Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44106
(216) 844-5432
 
Roger Williams Cancer Center
Brown University
825 Chalkstone Avenue
Providence, Rhode Island 02908
(401) 456-2071
 
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
332 North Lauderdale Street
Memphis, Tennessee 38101-0318
(901) 522-0306
 
Institute for Cancer Research and Care
4450 Medical Drive
San Antonio, Texas 78229
(512) 616-5580
 
Utah Regional Cancer Center
University of Utah Health Sciences Center
50 North Medical Drive, Room 2C110
Salt Lake City, Utah 84132
(801) 581-4048
 
Massey Cancer Center
Medical College of Virginia
Virginia Commonwealth University
1200 East Broad Street
Richmond, Virginia 23298
(804) 786-9641
 
 
Consortia

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 38
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

 
Drew-Meharry-Morehouse Consortium Cancer Center
1005 D.B. Todd Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37208
(615) 327-6927








































HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 39
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
                             General Announcments
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

                 THE UCI MEDICAL EDUCATION SOFTWARE REPOSITORY 

This is to announce the establishment of an FTP site at the University of 
California, for the collection of shareware, public-domain software and other 
information relating to Medical Education.  

Specifically, we are interested in establishing this site as a clearinghouse 
for personally developed software that has been developed for local medical 
education programs.  We welcome all contributions that may be shared with 
other users.  

To connect to the UCI Medical Education Software Repository, ftp to: 

                     FTP.UCI.EDU

The Repository currently offers both MSDOS and Macintosh software, and we hope 
to support other operating systems (UNIX, MUMPS, AMIGA?).  

Uploads are welcome.  We actively solicit information and software which you 
have personaly developed or have found useful in your local medical education 
efforts, either as an instructor or student.  

Once you have connected to the site via FTP, cd (change directory) to either 
the med-ed/mac/incoming or the med-ed/msdos/incoming directories, change the 
mode to binary and "send" or "put" your files.  Note that you won't be able to 
see the files with the "ls" or "dir" commands.  Please compress your files as 
appropriate to the operating system (ZIP for MSDOS; Compactor or something 
similar for Macintosh) to save disk space.  

After uploading, please send email to Steve Clancy (slclancy@uci.edu) (for 
MSDOS) or Albert Saisho (saisho@uci.edu) (for MAC) describing the file(s) you 
have uploaded and any other information we might need to describe it.

Note that we can only accept software or information that has been designated 
as shareware, public-domain or that may otherwise be distributed freely.  
Please do not upload commercial software!  Doing so may jeopardize the 
existence of this FTP site.  

If you wish to upload software for other operating systems, please contact 
either Steve Clancy, M.L.S. or Albert Saisho, M.D. at the addresses above.

HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 40
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
                              AIDS News Summaries
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

                              AIDS Daily Summary

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National AIDS  
Clearinghouse makes available the following information as a public  service 
only. Providing this information does not constitute endorsement  by the CDC, 
the CDC Clearinghouse, or any other organization. Reproduction  of this text 
is encouraged; however, copies may not be sold.  Copyright 1993, Information, 
Inc., Bethesda, MD 

      ==================================================================    
                                April 12, 1993 
      ==================================================================    

"NIH Set to Test Multiple AIDS Vaccines" Reuters (04/08/93)  (Frank, 
Jacqueline) 

     Washington--The Clinton administration will permit the National  
Institutes of Health to test multiple AIDS vaccines instead of  only allowing 
the Army to test a single vaccine, administration  sources said Thursday.  The 
decision ends the controversy between Army AIDS researchers who had hoped to 
test a vaccine made by  MicroGeneSys Inc. and the National Institutes of 
Health, which  contended that multiple vaccines should be tested.  Health and  
Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala said a final announcement  on the 
therapeutic vaccine trials was expected to be made last  Friday.  Companies 
including Genentech Inc., Chiron Corp., and  Immuno AG have already told NIH 
that they are prepared to  participate in the vaccine tests.  The testing is 
intended to  demonstrate whether AIDS vaccines are effective in thwarting the  
replication of HIV in patients already infected.  Shalala refuted last week's 
reports that the Clinton administration had decided  the Army's test of the 
MicroGeneSys VaxSyn should proceed without tests of others at the same time.  
"The report was inaccurate,  and I expect there to be some announcement in the 
next 24 hours  about that particular AIDS research project," said Shalala.   
Administration sources subsequently confirmed that NIH director  Dr. Bernadine 
Healy and Food and Drug Administration Commissioner David Kessler had 
convinced the White House that multiple  vaccines should be tested 
simultaneously.  But MicroGeneSys  president Frank Volvovitz said a test of 
multiple vaccines could  triple the cost of the trial and delay it by two 
years.

==================================================================    


HICNet Medical Newsletter                                              Page 41
Volume  6, Number 10                                           April 20, 1993

"The Limits of AZT's Impact on HIV" U.S. News & World Report (04/12/93) Vol. 
114, No. 14, P. 18 

     AZT has become the most widely used drug to fight AIDS since it  was 
approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1987.   Burroughs Wellcome, 
the manufacturer of AZT, made $338 million  last year alone from sales of the 
drug.  However, a team of  European researchers recently reported that 
although HIV-positive patients taking AZT demonstrated a slightly lower risk 
of  developing AIDS within the first year of treatment, that benefit  
disappeared two years later.  The Lancet published preliminary  findings of 
the three-year study, which could give more reason  for critics to argue the 
drug's cost, side effects, and general  efficacy.  Even though U.S. 
researchers concede the study was  more comprehensive than American trials, 
many argue the European  researchers' suggestion that HIV-positive patients 
experience  little improvement in their illness before the development of  
AIDS symptoms.  In addition, researchers have long been familiar  with the 
--------- end of part 3 ------------

---
      Internet: david@stat.com                  FAX: +1 (602) 451-1165
      Bitnet: ATW1H@ASUACAD                     FidoNet=> 1:114/15
                Amateur Packet ax25: wb7tpy@wb7tpy.az.usa.na

File 60/1144: COntrol SYstems analysis PAcKage-COSY_PAK v0.9(updated)-for Mathematica (84.4%)


********************************************************************
*                                                                  *
*                            Announcing                            *
*                                                                  *
*                            COSY_PAK                              * 
*                                                                  *                           
*              (A symbolic COntrol SYstems analysis PAcKage)       *            
*                                                                  *
*                           Version 0.9                            * 
*                            		                           *    
*                      (NO USER FEE RELEASE)                       *             
*                                                                  *
*                               for                                *
*                                                                  *
*                      Mathematica Version 2.0 or higher           *
*                                                                  *
********************************************************************

==> INTRODUCTION

  COSY_PAK is set of packages and notebooks for classical control and 
(some) modern (state space) control analysis and design methods. The
notebooks in COSY_PAK follow a typical `Control Engineering I' course
taught at many universities around the world for the junior/senior 
level undergraduates. There is NO FEE to use COSY_PAK but certain 
responsibilities are expected of the user (see Copyright notice in the 
README file included below). For starters e-mail / FAX / Mail (Post) 
the registration form included in the README file.

COSY_PAK is available via `anonymous ftp' from

          mishna.esys.cwru.edu (INTERNET No : 129.22.40.23) 

in the /pub directory. 



==> FUTURE RELEASES

   If you would like to receive updates and newer versions of
COSY_PAK please send e-mail/FAX/mail to the address
below. In addition, your  comments and suggestions are
appreciated and are invaluable to us. We will do our  best
to  fix any reported bugs. However, we cannot fix those
bugs that  have not been  reported to us and those we do not
know of. We would  very much appreciate you taking  a few
minutes to communicate to us  via e-mail / US Mail / 
Telephone / FAX. This will help us to release  bug-free
versions in the future. Comments are welcome. 

N. Sreenath
Systems Engineering Department
Case School of Engineering
Case Western Reserve University

******************
e-mail: sree@mishna.cwru.edu

U.S. Mail:

Prof. N. Sreenath                    Tel.: (216) 368-6219
Systems Engg., Crawford Hall         FAX: (216) 368-3123
Case Western Reserve Univ.
Cleveland OH 44106-7070
  
========================= Begin README file =========================




                       (NO USER FEE RELEASE)

			     COSY_PAK 
			     
	       (A symbolic COntrol SYstems analysis PAcKage)
			    
			    Version 0.9                
		 
	                        for
				
                  	Mathematica Version 2.0 or higher

                                by

               C.K.Chen 		N. Sreenath
		
	     	         Systems Engineering
		     Case School of Engineering
	     	   Case Western Reserve University		
	     	      Cleveland, OH, 44106-7070		       
		      e-mail: sree@mishna.cwru.edu
			
--> Copyright
    :Copyright: Copyright 1992 by C. K. Chen and N. Sreenath, Case 
Western Reserve University. 
        
    Permission to use, copy, modify and distribute this software and 
its documentation for any purpose and without fee is hereby granted, 
provided that the above copyright notice appear in supporting 
documentation, and the name of the Case Western Reserve University,
Case School of Engineering not be used in advertising or publicity 
pertaining to distribution of the software without specific, without 
prior permission. Case Western Reserve University makes no 
representations about the suitability of this software for any 
purpose. It is provided "as is" with out express or implied warranty.
    		
--> Acknowledgements

    Support from CWRU Information and Network Services - Dr. Ray Neff,
Case Alumni Association, The Lilly Foundation and the Systems 
Engineering Department of Case Western Reserve University is 
gratefully acknowledged. Special thanks to Brian Evans of Georgia Tech  
for all the help.  

--> FTP

     COSY_PAK is available by anonymous `ftp' from 
mishna.esys.cwru.edu (Internet No. 129.22.40.23). A sample ftp session 
is given at the end of this file.

**********************************************************************

--> Changes in Version 0.9 (update from v0.81 to v0.9)

	In this version, we have revised COSY_PAK to take advantage of 
the more robust signal processing functions available in Mathematica v2.1.  
Since Mathematica 2.1 provides a better  and  working 
LaplaceTransform and InverseLaplaceTransform functions than 
Mathematica v2.0 did, we adopted them. This has made COSY_PAK 
smaller. Thus Brian Evans' Signal Processing packages that supported 
the LaplaceTransform  and InverseLaplaceTransform functions in the 
COSY_PAK v0.81 are no longer needed directly by COSY_PAK v0.9. For 
power users who  use Signal Processing we still recommend the use of the very  
fine  Brian Evans package on Signal Processing (available at 
the anonymous  ftp site gauss.eedsp.gatech.edu  or  IP # 130.207.226.24).  On  
the  downside, the disadvantage of this update 
can be that Mathematica 2.1 requires more runtime resources than its 
previous version. 


***********************************************************************	
--> For Mathematica 2.0 users
	
	We have included the LaplaceTransform package from Mathematica 2.1 in  
the directory `For_2.0'. Please move all files and directory under For_2.0 into  
the Calculus directory under Mathematica Packages directory. 

**************************************************************************
	    
--> Introduction
   
    This is an unsupported release of COSY_PAK - a COntrol SYstems 
analysis PAcKage for symbolic control systems analysis using 
Mathematica 2.1. Classical control systems analysis and design methods and some  
modern control systems methods have been implemented in this package. 
    
    This package and the attendant notebooks were developed on a 
NeXT (TM) computer (a UNIX based workstation). They have been 
used as a supplementary teaching aid along with  standard control 
engineering texts (Ogata [1991], Phillips and Harbor [1991]) for 
undergraduate courses in `Control Engineering I' taught at the Systems 
Engineering Department of CWRU. In addition to the NeXT, they have 
also been tested successfully on Apple Macintosh computers (TM), and, 
IBM PC's (TM) running MS Windows(TM). We would be very much interested 
to hear from you if you or anybody you know uses this software on 
platforms not mentioned above. IBM users however will have to 
evaluate the notebooks first to visualize the graphics.

    Once installed (see below for instructions), this  collection  of  
Mathematica  packages  can be loaded by any user. Bundled with the 
packages are many notebooks ("COSY_Notes") which demonstrate  
the functionality of these packages. The notebooks follow a plan of 
many fine, standard, undergraduate Control Engineering text books 
listed in the references. Examples used in these notebooks have 
been collected from the various references given at the end of this 
file. The contents of the notebooks in the "COSY_Notes" directory are 
given below.
   
 ----------- Begin "COSY_Notes" Contents -----------
 
 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 01_Introduction.ma
 CHAPTER 1: Introduction to Control Systems
	
	Sections:  
	     Analyticity
	     Poles and Zeros
	     Signals
	     Forward Laplace Transforms
	     Inverse Laplace Transforms
	     Differential Equation With Zero-Valued Initial Conditions
	     Differential Equation With Initial Conditions
	     	     
 -----------
 
 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 02_Math_Models.ma
 CHAPTER 2: Mathematical Modeling of Dynamic Systems

 	 Sections:  
	      ODE to State Space  
	      Linearization of a Nonlinear System of Equations  
	      State Space to Transfer Function
		     
 -----------
 
 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 03_*_Transient_Response.ma
 CHAPTER 3: Transient-Response Analysis  
            (Chapter split into three sub notebooks because of file
	     size)

	 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 03_1_Transient_Response.ma
            
	    Sections :       
	      Time Response Analysis  
	      First order System  
	      Second Order System  
	      Third Order and Higher Order Systems
	      
         NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 03_2_Transient_Response.ma
            
	    Sections  :        	      
	      First Order System (Step Response vs. Time Const)  
	      
	      
         NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 03_3_Transient_Response.ma
            
	    Sections  :
	      Second Order System (Step Response vs. Damping Ratio)  
	      
	            
 -----------

 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 04_Steady_State_Response.ma
 CHAPTER 4: Steady-State Response
 
         Sections:	      
	      Routh's Stability 
 	      Steady-State Error Analysis
                
 -----------
		
 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 05_Root_Locus.ma
 CHAPTER 5: Root-Locus Analysis

 -----------
 
 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 06_Freq_Response.ma
 CHAPTER 6: Frequency-Response Analysis

         Sections:
	      Bode Plot Analysis  
	      Magnitude vs. Phase Plot (Nichols Plot)
	      Polar Plot  
	      Nyquist Plot  
	      Combined Example
	      
 -----------
 
 NOTEBOOK FILE NAME: 07_State_Space.ma
 CHAPTER 7: State Space Methods

         Sections:
	      Introduction
	      State Transition Matrix
	      Controllability
	      Observability
	      Output Controllability
	      Pole Placement Design 
	      Observer Design
	      Time Response Using State Space Methods

 
 ----------- End Notebook Contents -----------
 

--> Compressed Files

        The files that contain  a  complete set of the COSY_PAK v0.9
packages and Notebooks for Mathematica are:

 COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z     		compressed tar file for Unix systems
	
 COSY_PAK_09.sit.hqx     	compressed sit file for Macintosh 
 				systems and encoded by BinHex 4.0 
				format (requires the   shareware
				 Stuffit file v 1.5.1 or higher). 
	
 COSY_PAK_IBM_09.zip    	zip file for the IBM PC running MS-DOS
    
     Once expanded the Mathematica files can also be used on 
Macintosh / IBM PC / Unix systems also.


--> Installation of COSY_PAK

 o In UNIX Command line type the following command:

      zcat COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z | tar xvf -

 o In Macintosh open the .sit.hqx file using the shareware
    Stuffit v 1.5.1 or higher.
  
 o In IBM Command line type the following command:

      pkunzip -o -d COSY_PAK_IBM_09.zip

pkunzip version 2.0 or  higher to unzip it.  IBM PC's may limit the 
directory name characters to eight. In that event type "pkunzip -o -d 
COSY_PAK.zip.  You can also unzip the COSY_PAK_IBM_09.zip file on any 
Unix machine if you have unzip utility on it.


     Uncompressing and untarring "COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z" or unzipping 
"COSY_PAK_IBM_09.zip" will create a directory called "COSY_PAK".
         	
Once the files are expanded you should see a single directory 
"COSY_PAK" containing the following three files, four 
sub-directories and their contents:

SUB-DIRECTORIES in "COSY_PAK":  
  COSYPAK    - contains control tool box packages 
  MANUAL     - COSY_PAK manual in .ps, .rtf, .txt, and .wn formats. 
  COSY_Notes - contains notebooks 
  For_2.0    - contains Laplace transform package from Mathematica 2.1
  		For Mathematica 2.0 users.	 
    		
FILES in directory "COSYPAK":
  chap1.m   chap2.m   chap3.m  chap4.m  chap5.m   chap6.m  chap7.m
	
FILES in directory "COSY_Notes":
	01_Introduction.ma	  
	02_Math_Model.ma
	03_1_Transient_Response.ma   
	03_2_Transient_Response.ma   
	03_3_Transient_Response.ma   
	04_Steady_State_Response.ma
	05_Root_Locus.ma	  
	06_Freq_Response.ma 
	07_State_Space.ma         
	
FILES in directory "For_2.0":
	LaplaceTransform.m     DiracDelta.m	
	SUB-DIRECTORIES in "COSY_PAK":	Common
	FILES in directory "Common":  Support.m

********************* Important ********************	

	The notebook example files(.ma files) will be under the 
"COSY_Notes" directory.  To use the notebooks, move the directory `COSYPAK' to  
a 
directory that  Mathematica can recognize :
	
        /LocalLibrary/Mathematica/Packages     	on a UNIX machine,
        MY_HardDisk:Mathematica:Packages   	on an Apple Macintosh,
        c:\winmath\packages                  	on an IBM PC.

	At the beginning of the "Initialization" cell of each notebook 
in  "COSY_Notes" directory, we list the example about how to make 
Mathematica identify the directory:

	(* Initialization of Path *)

	(* Example For a UNIX machine  (Default) *) 
	(*
	$Path=Join[$Path,
	{"/LocalLibrary/Mathematica/Packages"}];
	*)
	
	(* Example For an Apple Macintosh  *) 
	(*
	$Path=Join[$Path,
	{"MY_HardDisk:Mathematica:Packages"}];
	*)
	
	(* Example For IBM PC 	
	 *)
	(*
	$Path=Join[$Path,	
	 {"c:\winmath\packages"}];	
	*)	

Change the pathname according to your machine by removing the 
Mathematica comment sign `(*' and `)*' before and after `$Path' 
setting.

	This command makes Mathematica recognize the directory

        /LocalLibrary/Mathematica/Packages     	on a UNIX machine
        MY_HardDisk:Mathematica:Packages   	on a Apple Macintosh
        c:\winmath\packages                	on an IBM PC


--> Mathematica 2.0 users
	
	We include the LaplaceTransform package from Mathematica 2.1 in 
the directory For_2.0. Please move all files and directory under For_2.0 
into the Calculus directory under Mathematica Packages directory. 


--> Getting started

       After installation, start Mathematica and open the notebooks in 
the "COSY_Notes" directory. All notebooks load their own packages. 
Navigate in the notebooks and enjoy. IBM users however will have to 
evaluate the notebooks to visualize the graphics.
    
*************************************************************** 

--> USER RESPONSIBILITIES

      We request you to take a few minutes and fill out the 
information below and mail it to us by e-mail / FAX / U.S. Mail. This 
will help us to keep your abreast of the improvements and release new 
versions of COSY_PAK. Suggestions for improvements are welcome.

-------------------------------cut here-------------------------------
  
  YOUR NAME:     ________________________________________
 
  ORGANIZATION:  ________________________________________
  
  TITLE:         ________________________________________
  
  e-mail:        ________________________________________

  POSTAL ADDRESS:________________________________________
  
                 ________________________________________
		   
  Comments &     ________________________________________
  
  Suggestions:   ________________________________________
		 
                 ________________________________________
		 



-------------------------------cut here-------------------------------

Mail this information to (E-mail / FAX / U.S. Mail) :


U.S. Mail:

Prof. N. Sreenath                    Tel.: (216) 368-6219
Systems Engg., Crawford Hall         FAX: (216) 368-3123
Case Western Reserve Univ.
Cleveland OH 44106-7070
  
*************************************************************** 

--> REPORT BUGS

     Please report bugs and leave comments to the address above. 
Any suggestion for improvements and criticism are welcome.

     We will do our best to  fix any reported bugs. However, we cannot 
fix those bugs that have not been  reported to us and those we do not 
know of. We would very much appreciate you taking  a few minutes to 
communicate to us via e-mail / US Mail /  Telephone / FAX. This will 
help us to release bug-free versions in the future.
	
	
***************************************************************

--> Disclaimer and Future Releases

 	This software is the property of the Case Western Reserve 
University. Use this software at your own risk. We make no express or 
implied  warranty.

	The packages and the notebooks can also be made to run under 
Mathematica versions 2.0 or lower with modification. We do not 
guarantee the outcome.


--> Documentation

        COSY_PAK functions are indexed in the files in the 
`MANUAL' directory according the chapters. Usage is illustrated in 
notebooks residing in `COSY_Notes' directory.  If your computer does 
not support notebooks find a Macintosh computer and acquire MathReader 
which is a public domain notebook reader. MathReader will at least 
allow you to peruse notebooks but you will not be able to evaluate 
any code fragments.
	

--> References

Dorf, R. C., "Modern Control Systems", Sixth Edition, Addison 
Wesley, New York, 1992.

Fortmann, T. E., and Hitz, K. L., "An Introduction to Linear Control 
Systems", Marcel Dekker, 1977.

Franklin, G. F., Powell, D. J., and Emami-Naeini, A., "Feedback 
Control of Dynamic Systems", Second Edition, Addison Wesley, New 
York, 1991.

Kuo, B. C., "Automatic Control Systems", Sixth Edition, Prentice Hall, 
New Jersey, 1990.

Ogata, K., "Modern Control Engineering", Second Edition, Prentice 

Hall, New Jersey, 1991.

Phillips, C. L., and Harbor, R. D., "Feedback Control Systems", 
Second Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1991.


========================= End README file =========================

TYPICAL `ftp' session :
-----------------------

%ftp mishna.esys.cwru.edu
Connected to mishna.
220 mishna FTP server (Version 5.20 (NeXT 1.0) Sun Nov 11, 1990) ready.

Name (mishna.esys.cwru.edu:sree): anonymous


ftp> cd /pub

ftp> binary

ftp> ls
200 PORT command successful.
150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for file list.
COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z
COSY_PAK_IBM_09.zip
Index
README
places.wmd
COSY_PAK_untar
226 Transfer complete.
78 bytes received in 0 seconds (15.35 Kbytes/s)

ftp> get COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z
200 PORT command successful.
150 Opening BINARY mode data connection for COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z (460822 bytes).
226 Transfer complete.
local: COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z remote: COSY_PAK_09.tar.Z
460822 bytes received in 1.33 seconds (3.38e+02 Kbytes/s)

ftp> quit
221 Goodbye.


--